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USS Waddell DDG-24 - History

USS Waddell DDG-24 - History

Waddell

James Iredell Waddell-born on 13 July 1824 in Pittsboro, N.C.-was appointed a midshipman on 10 September 1841-and began serving in ship-of-the-line Pennsylvania the following December. During the Mexican War, he took part in the blockade at Vera Cruz while- assigned to the brig Somers; and he subsequently saw sea duty along the coast of South America in sloop-of-war Germantown and completed a tour of duty as an instructor at the Naval Academy. In July 1859, he reported on board Saginaw and later returned from a tour of duty in the Orient with the East Indies Squadron, in John Adams, shortly after the outbreak of the Civil War. As his sympathies lay with the Southern States, he resigned his commission in the Navy, and his name was struck from the Navy rolls on 18 January 1862.

Waddell secretly entered the service of the Confederacy by way of Baltimore, Md., and received an appointment as lieutenant in the Confederate States Navy on 27 May 1862. The Confederate Navy, however,

had few ships to which these officers could be assigned. Naval officers were, as a result, assigned to artillery units. Thus employed, Waddell participated in the attempt to stop the Federal Fleet from investing New Orleans.; helped man a gun battery in repulsing the Union flotilla in the Battle of Drewry's Bluff, Va., and performed nearly identical service manning a gun battery in the defense of Charleston, S.C., until March of 1863. At that time, he sailed for France in a steamer acquired by Confederate naval agent James D. Bulloch.

On 19 October 1864, near Funchal, Madeira, Waddell took command of an iron-hulled screw steamer-Sea King-a Clyde- built merchantman which had earlier sailed, ostensibly, for Bombay, India, on a trading voyage. It was off Madeira, however, that Sea King underwent the transformation from merchantman to manof-war. Fitted out secretly, Sea King was armed and renamed Shenandoah, and set course for the Pacific. 1

Under orders to concentrate on the previously unmolested Union whaling fleet in the Pacific, Shenandoah put five ships to the torch en route to the Cape of Good Hope, and bonded a sixth to carry prisoners to Bahia, Brazil. Proceeding through the Indian Ocean, Waddell paused at Melbourne, Australia, long enough to repair a defective propeller shaft in January 1865 and enlist the aid of 42 "stowaways" who appeared on deck soon after departure to swell the ranks of what had previously been an under-strength crew.

Shenandoah captured four Yankee whalers en route to the Sea of Okhotsk, and later operated in the Bering Sea-capturing two dozen prizes between 21 and 29 June. One of the latter prizes carried a choice findrelatively recent newspapers. But the news which the Southerners read was not good-General Robert E. Lee had surrendered at Appomattox Court House, Va., while President Jefferson Davis had issued his defiant "Danville Proclamation" calling for a continued vigorous prosecution of the war against the Union forces.

Waddell and his crew sighted no additional sails until 2 August 1865, when his ship fell in with British merchantman Barracouta. The Briton informed Shenandbah that the Confederacy had completely collapsed and that Shenandoah was thus no longer a man-of-war, but a "pirate" ship without a country. This made the erstwhile raider subject to seizure under international law.

A thousand miles west of Acapulco, Mex., and 13 days from San Francisco, Calif., Waddell disregarded advice to beach his ship or sail to the nearest British colonial port where his men would be forced to shift for themselves. Subsequently, courage and seamanship brought Shenandoah through a remarkable 17,000-mile voyage, via Cape Horn, to England. On 2 November 1865 , Shenandoah stood proudly into Liverpool, England, where she was surrendered to British authorities for eventual turnover to the United States government.

Waddell remained in England until amnesty was offered in 1875. He then returned to his native land after an absence of nearly a decade and became a captain in the Pacific Mail Company steamship line. Given command of steamer City of San Francisco, Waddell sailed to the South Pacific near waters where, nearly 10 years before, his name and that of his ship had been feared. Calling at Honolulu in 1876, the arrival of the erstwhile raider-skipper went, apparently, unnoticed. Or so it seemed. As City of San Francisco stood out to sea the next day, the Royal Hawaiian Band played "Dixie"- farewell music with a different "twist." Waddell dipped his Rag in salute!

Subsequently, the sea captain became commander of the Maryland State Flotilla for the policing of oyster beds. While thus employed, Waddell died at Annapolis, Md., on 15 March 1886.

(DDG-24: dp. 4,500 (f.); 1. 435'-, b. 47'- dr. 2,1110". s. 30 k.; cpl. 354; a. 2 5" , ASROC, ~ Mk. 32 tt."

Tartar; cl. Charles F. Adams)

Waddell (DDG-24) was laid down on 6 February
1962 at Seattle, Wash., by Todd Shipyards Corp.; launched on 26 February 1963; sponsored by Mrs. Howard W. Cannon; and commissioned on 28 August 1964, Comdr. Carl J. Boyd in command.

Following trials from October 1964 to May 1965, the new guided missile destroyer conducted shakedown off the west coast into July, before she participated in antiaircraft and electronic warfare Exercise "Hot Stove" from 26 August to 3 September. During this time, while serving as plane-guard for Ticonderoga (CVA-14), Waddell rescued Comdr. C. H. Peters, whose plane had ditched off the coast of southern California.

On 28 September 1965, Waddell-in company with Ticonderoga and three destroyers, and acting as flagship for Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 132-departed her home port, Long Beach, Calif., bound for her first tour of duty in the Western Pacific (WestPac). After stopping at Pearl Harbor, she proceeded on toward the Philippines.

While en route on 31 October, the American task group received a radio message reporting that Japanese merchantman Tokei Maru had suffered an explosion on board. Detached to render assistance, Waddell sped to the scene and lowered her motor whaleboat containing the squadron doctor. The ship's rescue party arrived on board to find three men of Tokei Maru's complement already dead and another seriously burned. After providing medical assistance which saved the man's life and having left Tokei Maru a supply of medicine to suffice until the Japanese ship could make port, Waddell rejoined her consorts.

Only one day after reaching Subic Bay, Waddell got underway on 2 November for the coast of Vietnam and her first deployment to "Yankee Station" W-5, in the Tonkin Gulf. On station with Task Unit (TU) 77.0.2 until the 14th, the ship returned to Subic Bay for brief local operations before sailing back to the combat zone, to take her post on the northern search and rescue station (SAR) from 29 November to 29 December.

On 7 December, Waddell steamed alongside Sacramento (AOE-1) conducting an underway replenishment on the oiler's port side; while Brinkley Bass (DD-887) replenish to starboard of the oiler. During the operation, Brinkley Bass reported a man overboard; and Waddell executed an emergency break-away and doubled back to pick up the man.

Upon completion of this SAR tour, the destroyer sailed via Sasebo to Buckner Bay, Okinawa. She conducted a missile shoot in Ryukyu waters and then visited Hong Kong. On 31 January 1966, she sailed for Danang, en route to a second deployment to the northern SAR area.

At 1410 on 3 February 1966, Waddell was notified that a pilot was possibly downed in their vicinity. While proceeding to investigate, the ship noted "surface action" to port and commenced shore bombardment at 1501. Communist guns replied 14 minutes later. Waddell then trained her guns on the communist batteries. At 1545, while still shelling the communist gun positions, Waddell was straddled by the enemy guns which had found the range. Radical maneuvers enabled the destroyer to retire without damage, and she emerged from the action unscathed.

The following day, after receiving fuel from Sacramento in an underway replenishment while on station, Waddell collided with Brinkley Bass. The damage which Waddell sustained forced her to return to the Philippines for repairs.

Back in Vietnamese waters in late February, Waddell provided gunfire support in the III Corps operating area from 27 February to 11 March, as part of TU 70.8.9. She then returned-via Subic Bay, Guam, Midway, and Pearl Harbor-to her home port, Long Beach, where she arrived on 8 April.

Following a yard period-during which the ship underwent structural repairs Waddell participated in

various fleet and independent exercises off the California coast. Two days after Christmas of 1966, the ship got underway for another WestPac deployment.

Early in 1967, Waddell was again busily engaged off the Vietnamese coastline. From 2 March to 21 May 1967, the ship displayed "exceptional readiness and effectiveness in all tasks assigned," including gunfire support off South Vietnam; interdiction of North Vietnamese supply traffic along the coast; and gunfire against selected targets in North Vietnam. Coming under hostile fire from shore on one occasion, Waddell returned the fire and inflicted maximum damage on enemy shore batteries while emerging without harm. During her second WestPae deployment in Vietnamese waters, the destroyer fired some 2,000 rounds of ammunition while winning the reputation of being "the busiest ship in the Tonkin Gulf" before heading home.

Waddell made port at Long Beach on 29 May 1967 and operated briefly off the southern California coast. She entered the Long Beach Naval Shipyard on 4 August and commenced an extensive overhaul which lasted through the end of the year 1967 and into February 1968.

She returned to WestPac that summer-with logistics stops at Pearl Harbor and Midway en route-and arrived at her new home port of Yokosuka, Japan, on 1 August 1968. She conducted three tours on the "gun line" off North and South Vietnam into the fall, as well as one tour as plane guard for the attack carrier strike group based around Coral Sea (CVA-43) and Ranger (CVA-61).

On 22 September while operating off the demilitarized zone (DMZ) in company with St. Paul (CA-73), Waddell participated in a SAR operation. At 0145, an attack bomber splashed near the ship. Both crew members had previously ejected from their stricken jet and parachuted to the sea. Waddell closed to within 5,000 yards of the mouth of the Cua Vet River and rescued the navigator/bombardier, while St. Paul picked up the pilot.

After completing an overhaul at Yokosuka toward the end of December 1968, Waddell got underway on 7 January 1969, bound for the "gun line." Between 17 and 30 January, she fired two gunfire support missions in the I Corps area for the Army's 101st Airborne Division and one for the 7th and 9th Divisions of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) units. After a quick trip via Buckner Bay to Yokosuka, Waddell sped back to the "gun line" in late February and resumed her gunfire support duties on 1 March. There, in the II Corps area, she fired 12 support missions with Task Force "South." She subsequently conducted 79 more gunfire support missions including 12 for Australian units, 11 for ARVN units, and 15 in support of Operation "Sheridan"-in which the United States Army 101st Airborne and an ARVN regiment participated.

During the first week of April, the downing by North Koreans of a Navy EC 121 Connie early-warning intelligence aircraft in the Sea of Japan greatly increased tension in the Far East. Waddell departed the "gun line" at 22 knots, refueled at Buckner Bay, and arrived in the Strait of Tsushima to screen aircraft carriers Ticonderoga and Ranger. She operated in the Sea of Japan until the crisis abated enabling her to head for Yokosuka on the afternoon of 28 April.

,Returning to the "gun line," Waddell then lobbed shells at Viet Cong (VC) camps and infiltration points from waters off Phu Quoc Island in the Gulf of Siam in support of Operation "Javelin," before she was assigned to the Mekong Delta region. There, supporting two ARVN divisions, she conducted 19 bombardments against VC structures, bunkers, rest sites, and supply routes.

Subsequently returning to "Yankee Station," she screened Enterprise (CVAN 65) in June, as the big carrier conducted strike operations, and returned to waters near the DMZ in mid-July for gunnery support duties.
In 1970, Waddell's home port was again changedthis time to San Diego, Calif. During her next WestPac deployment, the destroyer continued her busy task of supporting ground units and standing by as a plane guard and a picket destroyer on "Yankee Station." In addition, she conducted occasional surveillance missions, watching Russian warships operating near the American task forces on not-so-subtle intelligence gathering missions of their own. One such mission took place as the Russians conducted Operation "Okean" in the Philippine Sea.

Returning to the west coast in the late summer of 1970, the ship operated off southern California and participated in underway exercises and plane-guard details through the end of that year and into 1971. She underwent an extended period of refresher training through the summer of 1971, operating off Seal Beach, San Diego, and San Clemente Island, Calif., until she got underway on 12 November for Danang, South Vietnam.

Waddell returned to the "gun line" on 12 December ar the DMZ to resume gunfire support operations in the southern half of the zone. She also performed interdiction and night harassment duties. Returning to Danang on 30 December, she got underway on the last day of the year to participate in TF 74's operations in the Indian Ocean.

Hostilities between India and Pakistan had caused the flurry of activity, as contingency plans were drawn up to rescue Americans caught in the area, if the need arose. However, the crisis soon passed; and Waddell returned to Subic Bay on 15 January 1972. Two days later, the ship was picked to represent the United States at the Imperial Ethiopian Navy Day celebration at Massawa, Ethiopia. After hasty preparations, Waddell stood out of Philippine waters and entered the Indian Ocean soon thereafter-for the second time in a fortnight.

After a brief stop at Colombo, Sri Lanka, on 28 January, Waddell arriv~ed at Massawa on 4 February and fired the prescribed 21-gun salute while her crew smartly manned the rail. During the visit, Waddell's athletic teams competed with those from visiting Russian, French, British, Sudanese, and Ethiopian ships. One high point of the brief stay was a visit by Emperor Haile Selassie. Another was a graduation exercise at which the Emperor requested an encore performance of Waddell's precision drill team-which had been first formed and trained while en route to Massawa!

Waddell's respite from the war was a short one, for she returned to the "gun line" on I April. Although her tour was scheduled to end on the 14th, stepped up communist ground activities resulted in her remaining into May.

From 3 to 9 April, Waddell encountered daily counterbattery fire from communist guns ashore. The ship's gunfire, in turn, was credited with knocking out several counterbattery sites. Most missions during this period fell in the area of the Cua Viet naval base and in Quang Tri province north of the Cua Viet River. At times, the range was so short that Waddell could observe her own fall of shot.

Late on the afternoon of 8 April, Waddell took a "high priority" target under fire, and received heavy counterbattery fire in return. A secondary explosion ashore attested to the fact that Waddell's shells had hit something-but the enemy stubbornly kept up the fire, landing a shell very close to the destroyer's bow. A surface burst damaged the ship's ASROC launcher, and shrapnel littered the destroyer's deck.

On 9 and 10 April, the ship fired so many missions that she needed two underway replenishments of her ammunition. From the 11th through the 21st, the pace continued to be rapid. On one occasion, Waddell destroyed several sampans detected ferrying Viet Cong and North Vietnamese troops across the Ben Hai River. In addition, the ship's guns blasted antiaircraft sites and coastal gun emplacements.

After renewing her guns at Subic Bay-they had been so worn by combat operations during AprilWaddell returned to Vietnamese waters to join TU 77.1.2 in Operation "Linebacker." For two weeks, Waddell made continuous gunnery strikes at night and sometimes encountered the fiercest return fire she had thus far experienced. She silenced some enemy batteries while picking up some shrapnel in return from nearmisses by the communist guns-before she shifted to waters off the DMZ, where she supported ARVN operations until 26 June. Her final two weeks of this WestPac deployment were spent on "Yankee Station" planeguarding for Coral Sea.

After sailing back to the United States-via Yokosuka-the ship underwent an extensive yard period * She spent the waning days of 1972 preparing for another deployment to the Far East, one which was different from the previous ones. For by this point, American land, sea, and air forces, were no longer committed in active combat roles in Vietnam. Thus, she conducted only training operations in the Gulf of Tonkin in February 1973, before she visited Beppu and Sasebo, Japan.

Waddell then took part in supervising parts of Operation "End Sweep," the clearance of minefields which had been planted in North Vietnamese coastal waters and off key ports. She conducted her first tour of "End Sweep" from 19 March to 13 April and was at sea again with "End Sweep" from 27 to 30 June. In between these deployments, Waddell performed screening duties for Coral Sea and Constellation (CVA-64) and visited Hong Kong; Subic Bay; Penang, Malaysia; and Singapore.

Returning to the west coast on 2 August, Waddell spent the remainder of the year in exercises and local operations off the southern California coast before again sailing for the Orient on 23 April 1974. Following the usual stops-Pearl Harobor, Guam, and Midway she arrived in the Philippines on 16 May to conduct local operations out of Subic Bay.

Subsequently, the ship participated in Exercise Kangaroo I" near Shoalwater Bay, Australia, with units of the Royal Australian Navy. Following local operations out of Subic Bay and Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Waddell got underway for the west coast on 28 September 1974 and made port at San Diego on 18 October.

Remaining at San Diego until 22 January 1975, she was towed by Tawasa (ATF 92) to the Long Beach Naval Shipyard where she underwent an extensive overhaul from 24 January to 3 December. As of 1979, Waddell actively served with the Pacific Fleet.

Waddell received 11 engagement stars for her service in waters off Vietnam and two Navy Unit Commendations.


USS Waddell DDG-24 - History

I as many other former veterans do have this obstruction in our brains about “our” stories because we find them insignificant compared to our brothers that gave their lives in war or operations for our country no matter the war or conflict. For myself I have a great feeling for our veterans who did return home scarred, maimed and disfigured for life. I admire those veterans very much. I think of them daily. I was lucky….the times we were fired upon…most of us never received a scratch. Again, we were the lucky ones.

The ships log should confirm most of this action but does not translate to what I and other sailors on the Waddell especially gunners mates, bridge personnel and people assigned to Combat Information Center (CIC) witnessed during this incident. I was assigned the surface radar in CIC during general quarters and witnessed these happenings.

It was late March 1967 and the USS Waddell (DDG24) had been released by Operations Tactical Command (OTC) of COMPHIBRON One aboard the USS Princeton (LPH5), to proceed to the north Tonkin Gulf to conduct Sea Dragon patrols. Sea Dragon Patrols were intended to interdict waterborne communication and logistic craft (WBLC) targets and stopping the flow of troops and supplies on shore. Sea Dragon Patrols were carried out by Destroyers and Cruisers.

The Waddell departed the area after performing (NGFS) naval gunfire support for the Marines and their ARVN counterparts south of the DMZ in the mouth of the Cua Viet River on operation Beacon Hill. Most of us were not aware that the intense build up of NVN troops and the stepped up exchange of fire with shore guns was to be later seen in the TET offensive in late 1967 and early 1968. The Marines along the DMZ were in battles and fire fights daily with the North Vietnamese Army and sappers units filtering south helping to clear the way.

Within hours of leaving the Cua Viet area the Waddell linked up with the USS Cunningham (DD752) and proceeded to conduct Sea Dragon Patrols just north of the DMZ near Dong Hoi, North Vietnam a staging area for North Vietnamese troops and logistics moving south. As stated above, Sea Dragon Patrols were geared to stop infiltration of men and equipment along the coastal supply routes both in country and along the coastal waterways. The missions included various shore targets…. radar sites, artillery, troop concentrations, ammunition storage, and staging areas to list a few along with harassment fire. We had been in Vietnam long enough to know that things could change quickly.

It was near the end of the winter monsoon season where the weather is a little cooler with rain and drizzle, low cloud cover and fog. On days when the weather was more accommodating we had the targets designated by Navy A1 Sky raiders or S2 trackers. At times the Army O1 Bird Dogs. We also had the luxury of having Combat Air Patrols (CAP) in the area for assistance if it became necessary.

During the last two days in March the Waddell and Cunningham (along with the USS Cogswell (DD651) until relieved to other duties) took on troop concentrations and staging areas around Vinh Linh in the southern most part of North Vietnam receiving shore battery fire on several occasions. These duals with the North Vietnamese batteries were usually short and intense.

As the fast movers broke into the Gulf and proceeded in our direction at a distance of 9000 yards the Waddell fired one 5” 54 caliber round at the leading three craft. Normally before any surface craft would get close to a Warship the craft would be identified and most likely engaged by our CAP aircraft. With the low visibility, fog and rain our CAP assistance was of little use even though they were available in the area. Another hindrance was the FMC were closing fast and little time was available to use any assistance from others other than the Cunningham. As the first round hit near the first FMC craft the Radarman could see the echo of the splash on his surface radar. Using this gift of the rounds hitting the water on our surface radars each time we fired the Radarman on our surface radar and the gunners mate on Mount 51 walked our ships gunfire onto the leading craft and sunk the first three almost immediately. The remaining four craft retreated back into the tributary. Assuming they were hidden by a small jetty at the mouth of the tributary was a mortal mistake for the FMC crews. The Waddell continued to walk the 5”54 rounds on the craft until all but one had disappeared. The seventh craft melted into the shore line on up into the tributary. As was the SOP (standard operating procedure) for unidentified surface craft the FMC went into the log as “Waterborne Logistic Craft”.

Even with measures to run quite our ECM (Electronic Counter Measure Equipment) showed shore based fire control was following us up the coast both in North Vietnam and Hainan in China. The Waddell, Canberra and the Obrien moved northward to the area of the Song Ma River which leads from North Vietnam down past the infamous Thanh Hoa Bridge and into the Tonkin Gulf.


USS Waddell DDG-24 - History

Back in the states, I applied for an appointment to the U. S. Naval Academy during my senior year, and applied to Cornell University, where family connections helped with the scholarship. I ended up ranked about 6 out of 12 nominees for two appointments that my representative made, so I matriculated at Cornell. I got the "Authorization to Report" the weekend before finals - the Academy took all nominees without appointments, ranked them, and used them to fill the final slots. I made that cut. Needless to say, I got no studying and little sleep that weekend. I decided to go to the Naval Academy, mostly because it would not cost my parents anything.

When Plebe hazing started (at 0001 on our 4th day) I had no idea what had hit me.

I graduated "with distinction" 4 years later. That means I was great academically. In reality, I knew I was not command material. I still would rather play with my transistors.

I went to missile officer school en route to the Waddell. Unfortunately, by the time I graduated and got to the ship, they already had a missile officer (Skip Trease), so I got Deck. For someone more comfortable with machinery than people, this was an interesting time of my life. After a year, I not only knew that I wasn't command material, I have avoided management the rest of my life as a result of that time.

I eventually took over Gunnery, and eventually learned how to aim the 5"/54 guns, which were deadly accurate at 12 miles, when properly set up.

I left the Waddell and went on to the USS Oriskany (CVA34), and served another Vietnam tour with her. It was a very different view of the war, one where we never even saw the land we were defending.

When my 4 year obligation was up, I knew that I was not going to make the Navy a career, so I left and went to Stanford for graduate school, married, and had two children: Melynda and Christopher. When my doctoral adviser ran out of money (he was funded by the U.S. Navy), I went and got a job with IBM. 28 and a half years later, IBM sold my contract to Cadence Design Systems, and that is where I am now, still playing with transistors.

'67 Grounding

The Waddell, in it's early years at least, was a ship that I could feel a definite kinship to - brilliant in many ways, tripping over it's own feet in others.

A Side Note by Don Berkebile For Midway, we had just set “sea detail” and were following in the wake of a tug that was late coming out to meet us due to arrival time error ashore by the Coast Guard. The other ships in the Division were astern in a column formation. I think the tug cut a corner too close and the channel was not marked well. An incident waiting to happen. I thought we were too far to the left—but in the so called channel. With the Commodore, staff, Captain Walker, and the sea detail on the bridge it was crowded.

A Side Note by James Caldron I remember a tug pushing the Waddell to the pier, but can't remember the name. We were at Midway 8 days waiting for a fleet tug to tow us back to Pearl Harbor and that took 9 days. I recall spending 30 days in dry dock for repairs. The crew of the Waddell was limited to a small area on Midway Island. We drank the island dry by the second day. The Navy sent a plane load of beer to keep us occupied until the fleet tug arrived. I don't recall a departing ceremony as the ship left the Island. Could have been a small one and I just missed it.

These pictures are in drydock in Pearl after the grounding. Externally, we had a dent in the Sonar dome that had to be cut out and replaced, and both screws were destroyed. The three pictures of the screws are not mine I don't know who I got them from any more. (Rich Gartrell?)

'67 Shoot Out

The "Highlight" of the VietNam cruise in '67 was, of course, being shot at off North Vietnam. The North Vietnamese used portable artillery, so we never knew where it would be set up. They apparently used a couple normal surface-search radars to accurately plot our location and lay the guns the guns did not have their own targeting Radar that we could recognize. They also tended to target all guns on one ship at a time.

We were in a shore bombardment line about 6000 yards off the beach when the shells started falling. We immediately headed to sea, laying smoke, and firing back with Mt 52, walking shells along the beach using our Radar. It took over 20 minutes to get out of range. In the middle of our flight we get a call from the Cruiser with the Admiral wanting to know why the [email protected]#$#@! we're breaking ranks and running all over. By the time we were out of range, it was noon, and at noon our orders were to proceed to Subic Bay, PI, so we just sailed on over the horizon and didn't come back. I always wondered what the North Vietnamese commander put in his battle report. The 3 inch block headline "LONG BEACH DESTROYER HIT NINE TIMES" in a home-town newspaper was bad enough.

I remember a count of 155 rounds against us, based on a sonar tape count of surface and sub-surface bursts, with an estimate of about another half air bursts.

My battle station was "AA Forward", which meant I stood in the open on the signal bridge looking for any incoming aircraft below the radar. It also meant that I was in a perfect position to take pictures of the incoming explosions, which I did until one went off close aboard to starboard, behind me. I heard the shrapnel go by me that punched the hole in the signal bridge window, and saw the spray of glass. Apparently, that round did most of the damage to the starboard bow that I recorded in the rest of the pictures, and also narrowly missed the Captain who wasn't even wearing a helmet! After that, I got myself and the men on the open bridge inside the gun director barbette, not that the 1/4" aluminum was much protection. Mt 52 worked overtime that day as the blistered paint of its barrel attests.

'67 On The Gunline

and quite accurate, and were generally laid by map coordinates and spotted by spotter plane. In my few months of Gun Director officer, I only ever got one visual target to shoot at.

to the next round being fired. (04), I made sure I captured the actual green cast of the smokeless powder gas re-exploding outside the barrel. Why they gave us smokeless instead of flashless when we did most of our work at night I never understood. Even just one round a minute (we stayed awake shooting all night mostly harassing the Vietnamese and trying to keep them awake all night) would accumulate a reasonable pile of brass (05). Most of it went to line the bottom of the Tonkin Gulf (08). We had to continually dab the dings in the paint made by the brass with red-lead. The longer we were out of port, the worse it looked.

The empty cases for the powder also piled up. They wanted these cases back, but we didn't send them back to the ammunition ships when we rearmed at sea, so they piled up aft, or wherever there was room, till we got back to port.

Just after I moved from Deck to Gunnery, the davit for the Captain's gig let loose while it was being hoisted, and injured the new Deck officer and a couple of the crew. I had to take the gig into Danang overnight, and got a picture of Waddell as she sailed away. Out of curiosity (I needed to request my next assignment), I spent the night on a coastal patrol boat. A dull night, luckily.

It was a lot of fun sailing with our Australian Navy sister, the Hobart. Damn, did those Aussies know how to handle a ship!


Contents

Following trials from October 1964 to May 1965, the new guided missile destroyer conducted shakedown off the west coast into July, before she participated in antiaircraft and electronic warfare Exercise "Hot Stove" from 26 August to 3 September. During this time, while serving as plane-guard for Ticonderoga (CVA-14), Waddell rescued Comdr. C. H. Peters, whose plane had ditched off the coast of southern California.

On 28 September 1965, Waddell—in company with Ticonderoga and three destroyers, and acting as flagship for Commander, Destroyer Division (DesDiv) 132—departed her home port, Long Beach, California, bound for her first tour of duty in the Western Pacific (WestPac). After stopping at Pearl Harbor, she proceeded on toward the Philippines.

While en route on 31 October, the American task group received a radio message reporting that Japanese merchantman Tokei Maru had suffered an explosion on board. Detached to render assistance, Waddell sped to the scene and lowered her motor whaleboat containing the squadron doctor. The ship's rescue party arrived on board to find three men of Tokei Maru's complement already dead and another seriously burned. After providing medical assistance which saved the man's life and having left Tokei Maru a supply of medicine to suffice until the Japanese ship could make port, Waddell rejoined her consorts.


USS Waddell DDG-24 - History

A Tin Can Sailors
Destroyer History

The USS WADDELL (DDG󈚼) was launched on 26 February 1963 at Seattle’s Todd Shipyards and was commissioned on 28 August 1964. By August 1965, she was on plane‑guard duty with the TICONDEROGA (CVA󈚲), where she rescued one of the carrier’s pilots off the California coast. In September she left Long Beach for her first WestPac cruise. En route, her task group received word of an explosion aboard the Japanese merchantman TOKEI MARU. The WADDELL sped to the scene where she sent her motor whaleboat with the squadron doctor and a rescue party to the Japanese ship. They found three fatalities, but were able to save the life of a seriously burned crew member. The ship continued on her own, and the WADDELL rejoined her group.

November found the WADDELL bound for Vietnam and her first deployment on Yankee Station. She also spent a month on the northern search and rescue station (SAR). During a break, she rescued a man overboard from the BRINKLEY BASS (DD-887) while the two were conducting underway replenishment from the SACRAMENTO (AOE𔂫). She began a second deployment in the northern SAR area at the end of January 1966. During that deployment she engaged enemy shore batteries and retired from the action unscathed. She was not so lucky during a friendly encounter the following day. During another underway replenishment from the SACRAMENTO, the WADDELL collided with the BRINKLEY BASS and had to return to the Philippines for repairs. In March, following a stint on the gun line supporting troops in the III Corps operating area, she returned to Long Beach.

Early in 1967, the guided missile destroyer was underway for one of her busiest WestPac deployments. From 2 March to mid May, she engaged in gunfire support off South Vietnam, interdiction of North Vietnamese supply traffic along the coast, and gunfire against selected targets in North Vietnam. She again successfully fought off hostile fire. During her deployment, she fired some 2,000 rounds of ammunition before heading home.

After an extensive overhaul, the WADDELL returned to WestPac and Yokosuka, her new home port, in the summer of 1968. She conducted three tours on the gun line off North and South Vietnam and stood plane guard duty with the CORAL SEA (CVA󈛏) and RANGER. In September, off the DMZ, she and the ST. PAUL (CA󈛭), rescued the two-man crew of a downed attack bomber.

On the gunline in January 1969, she supported the Army’s 101st Airborne Division and the 7th and 9th ARVN Divisions. She was again on the gun line in March. There, in the II Corps area, she fired 12 support missions. She subsequently conducted 79 more gunfire support missions including 12 for Australian units, 11 for ARVN units, and 15 in support of the United States Army 101st Airborne and an ARVN regiment.

Early in April 1969, when North Korea downed a navy aircraft in the Sea of Japan, the WADDELL left the gun line for the Strait of Tsushima to screen the aircraft carriers TICONDEROGA and RANGER. She was back on the gun line at month’s end, shelling Vietcong camps and infiltration points from waters off Phu Quoe Island in the Gulf of Siam. She, then, moved on to the Mekong Delta to support ARVN divisions with 19 bombardments against multiple VC targets. Duty on Yankee Station and gunnery support near the DMZ ended that WestPac deployment.

In 1970, the WADDELL sailed out of San Diego for another Vietnam deployment, which included surveillance of Russian warships. Her WestPac tour in 1971 involved gunline operations near the DMZ and interdiction and night harassment. The year ended with operations in the Indian Ocean during an India-Pakistan crisis. In January 1972, she represented the U.S. at the Imperial Ethiopian Navy Day celebration at Massawa, Ethiopia. Back off Vietnam in April, she exchanged fire with shore batteries and knocked out several enemy sites. She operated mainly off the Cua Viet naval base and in Quang Tri province. In an April fire fight, she scored a major hit, suffering a close call when an enemy shell burst off her bow, damaged her ASROC launcher, and littered the her deck with shrapnel. The rapid pace continued as her guns destroyed several sampans ferrying Viet Cong and North Vietnamese troops across the Ben Hai River and blasted antiaircraft sites and coastal gun emplacements.

After replacing her worn out guns she took part in two weeks of continuous nighttime gunnery strikes, encountering the fiercest return fire she had thus far experienced. She silenced enemy batteries but also received shrapnel damage before shifting to waters off the DMZ to support ARVN operations. June. She ended her 1972 WestPac deployment on Yankee Station plane-guarding the CORAL SEA.

After an extensive overhaul, she returned to the Far East in early 1973. By that time, American land, sea, and air forces were no longer committed in active combat roles in Vietnam. She conducted only training operations in the Gulf of Tonkin, then supervised the clearance of minefields in North Vietnamese coastal waters and off key ports and performed screening duties for the CORAL SEA and CONSTELLATION (CVA󈛤).

From The Tin Can Sailor, July 2009


Copyright 2009 Tin Can Sailors.
All rights reserved.
This article may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from
Tin Can Sailors.


USS Waddell DDG-24 - History

USS King Association History Page - The Beginning

The importance of this page is that sometimes it is hard to see where you are going unless you look behind you.


Bill Brewer presenting plaques to founders
Steve Cuddihy and Terry Forsyth
at the 2002 Reunion in San Diego


Bill Brewer presenting plaques to
Jonathan Kammen
at the 2002 Reunion in San Diego

Timeline
by Steve Cuddihy

1997 - Web site was started in the fall.

1997- First contact by Mike Leonard.

2000, November 21 - Terry Forsyth made contact.

2001, January - Jack Dineen came on board.

2001, February - Jonathan Kammen offered to help.

2001, March 27 - Association Application went in.

2001, May 18 - First letter about the all hands reunion went out.

2002, January 1 - Jack Dineen first member.

2002, June 20 -23, was the first reunion. The Reunion Committee comprised of Terry Forsyth, Steve Cuddihy, Jack Dineen and Jonathan Kammen. During that time Bill Brewer, Irv Trinkle, Alan Barnett, all came on board to help.

The first Board of Directors
left to right: Steve Cuddihy, Terry Forsyth, Jonathan Kammen,
Irv Trinkle and Alan Barnett - not shown: Jack Dineen

The first Newsletter went out in September of 2002, shortly after the 2002 reunion in San Diego and thus a coveted communication device was born, thanks to Publisher and shipmate Dave Nesbitt.

In the fall of 1997, BT3 Steve Cuddihy (69-72) was looking for anything on the King and could not find anything. His son came home from college and asked what Steve was looking for and Steve told him that he was looking for something on the King and could not find anything. His son took over and in five minutes said that there is nothing. He said, &ldquoWhy don&rsquot you start something?&rdquo Steve said he didn&rsquot know how and his son said he would do it. Steve found his cruise books and old photo&rsquos and made copies and they were the first web page. Steve&rsquos thoughts were to get old shipmates back together and with the hope of getting a reunion together. I believe that LT. Mike Leonard (81 - 84) was the first person who made contact after the web site was on line. Shipmates started finding the site and were asking to post notes to locate old shipmates. Thus was the start of getting shipmates together again.

The first reunion attempt was pursued by GMG3 Jonathan Kammen (68-72). It didn&rsquot pan out and was never held.

In November of 2000, YN3 Terry Forsyth (72-74) with a new computer purchased in July that now provided access to the mystical world of the Internet he started searching for the King. His search paid off when he found ussking.com with BT2 Mike Luppino (60-63), webmaster. There were several messages from former shipmates on the message board. He then tried other combinations of USS King and found uss-king.com. He read pages of message board entries and saw names of guys he knew. After querying a few of those known shipmates, Terry found there was great interest in having a King Reunion. By end of a week the drive was overpowering and he started sending emails to everyone in the message board explaining who he was, what he&rsquod like to do, &ldquoThis is a genuine letter, please write back as I am looking forward to your response&rdquo. Originally two-thirds a page and four paragraphs, each email was retyped because Terry didn&rsquot know about the right-click copy option. It didn&rsquot take long for the letters to reduce to three lines. &ldquoUSS King Reunion in progress&hellip..please write back&rdquo with the closing we all saw

Terry Forsyth, YN3, USN
Weapons Office
72-74

For the remainder of the year, Terry obsessively spent almost all his non-work/waking hours to establishing contact with as many of the King&rsquos former crew members as was possible and receiving leads to other kingsmen and to databases resulting in discovery and more contacts.

In December Terry&rsquos first assistant was OS2 Jack Dineen (78-81) who offered to help locate the King&rsquos commanding officers. During this search, he learned that four of the King Officers eventually became admirals. Jack also said he would pursue locating the ship&rsquos bell.

Soon and throughout the search for the crew, Terry continually found where one guy was in current contact with at least one other shipmate. One group had FIVE guys!

About January 2001 someone wrote Terry that a film had been shot onboard the King in the 63-66 periods. Terry sent an email to all the contacts asking about this film. Confusion shortly followed because two different names for the same film were given. Terry put this on hold for future pursuit.

About January, Terry received an offer of money if the reunion effort became a non-profit organization. The idea to legitimize this blooming effort and becoming a real organization was seeded but Terry put this on hold because locating crewmembers was consuming all this King time.

Shortly later though and fully recognizing this growing and unofficial organization was more than he could hope to accomplish by himself, Terry sought help&mdashand now, quickly, a Board! If someone had offered help, Terry decided they were worthy of asking to help at a Board level. Terry had established some communications with Steve Cuddihy. Steve had informed Terry there was at least one other attempts to create a reunion with one by Jonathan Kammen. Terry remembered Kammen from the King and started emailing with him. Two friends of Jonathan&rsquos from King days were ET1 Irv Trinkle (70-72) and PN3 Alan Barnett (68-72). With this group of guys accepting Terry&rsquos request to help at a Board level, the effort began to create a reunion. Although unaware they were technically a steering committee, they called themselves the Board.

Jonathan Kammen, President &ndash Terry so nominated because of his prior attempt to establish a reunion.
Terry Forsyth &ndash Membership/Treasurer
Steve Cuddihy &ndash Web Master
Irv Trinkle &ndash Historian
Jack Dineen &ndash Director at large

In January, the new Board decided that the first reunion should be 2002, so a large enough body could be found to have a successful reunion and to give the people contacted enough time to make vacation plans.

In February, Terry received a note from MM3 Hans Bruckler (60-61) about an article from Stars and Stripes that discussed an 18-month schedule for a successful reunion. This provided the Board much relief to know they were not only on the right track it also outlined the future month requirements, as well.

By end of February, contact had been made with IC2 Bill Brewer (68-69). It turns out Bill was doing the exact effort as Terry but for the USS Waddell (DDG-24), Brewer&rsquos prior ship to the King, of searching for crewmembers and establishing their contact. Understandingly fully occupied with the Waddell effort, he nevertheless was there to provide guidance and wisdom to the Board.

About the first of March the Board started working on bylaws for the forming organization. Bill Brewer offered a copy of the Waddell&rsquos bylaws for a starting point. Initial contact made with STG2 Dave Bilby (66-69) in late February found another assistant who has a tax service and helped with the bylaws and getting the association application completed.

On March 20, 2001 the King bylaws were completed.

On March 27, 2001 with the Bylaws, officer list and application for Federal Tax ID number completed, Dave Bilby submitted these to the Internal Revenue Service for issuance of the Tax Exemption Application.

In April, the Board started discussing where to have the first reunion. It was decided the current contacts should help determine where they wanted to go so a survey was created and emailed.

By late May the returns stopped and the tally was taken. San Diego was the first choice, with Seattle a close second. Norfolk, Chicago and Las Vegas were the runners up. The announcement was made in June 2001 that San Diego will be the site for the 2002 Reunion.

Realizing the Board was without any knowledge and San Diego hotel experience, they determined a reunion services organization would have all the necessary knowledge and experience. When told the Board&rsquos decision on that, Brewer said the Waddell (DDG-24) steering committee had researched and selected Military Reunion and Locator Services, Inc. (ML&RS) of Hickory, NC as their reunion organizing company. Jonathan contacted them about handling the King&rsquos reunion as well. They gladly accepted and Jonathan signed the papers.

By end of July the name issue regarding the video shot on the King was settled by someone writing they had a copy and it cost $20.00. Having learned it was produced by Military Tradition Video in Escondido, CA, Terry contacted them. They said for a fundraising project and a minimum order of 25 videos, they would sell them to us for $10.00. In the course of pursuing the video&rsquos rightful name, many of the guys said they would want a copy of the video. The first batch of 60 videos was purchased on July 18. These sold quickly and 25 more copies ordered on August 17 and 25 more on September 19. Approximately 100 videos were sold by end of 2001, bringing about $1000.00 to the organization&rsquos checking account.

During the last half of 2001, Terry solicited the King contacts for copies of cruise books and received original books, complete copies, copies of division photos from various cruise books and even copies of personal lists of the crew. He went through all these items looking at each page and entered all the data he could find. The database grew exponentially. Terry estimated there were about 4400 crewmembers during the ship&rsquos total life.

With working 55+ hours weekly, and continuing his driven pace of 15-20 hours a week on King search, contact maintenance and countless Board emails, in January 2002 Terry asked PN3 Alan Barnett (69-72) to become the ship&rsquos store operator because purchased videos were not getting mailed. Alan accepted and the ship&rsquos store was born from his efforts.

In July 1995 IC2 Dave Turk (69-71) had saved the transom, the ship&rsquos name on the stern through a friend of his. ( How it was found) With hope of getting the transom to San Diego, Terry researched its transport and found shipping and transfers for getting it from Minneapolis to the hotel and back was 800.00. As much as the Board wanted the transom at the reunion, the dollar requirement removed any chance of the transom&rsquos presence.

In early February the Board received, from ML&RS, the proposed brochure of the weekend. They gave us two weeks to review and approve the brochure. And as always, more discussions, decisions&mdashand changes occurred between board members.

With this delay threatening the continued services of ML&RS, the final brochure approval barely made its second and last print date.

Also in February, the Board realized that in addition to selling videos and receiving donations another avenue was required to raise sufficient money for the projected March or April $2500.00 inventory deposits. Membership dues were established and immediately that, plus more donation money started to arrive.

Late in February, to help people who would give towards the effort, the Board recognized time had come to officially organize ourselves. Terry contacted Dave Bilby who is a tax consultant, and asked if he could provide his services in making the King Association a non-profit organization. He also offered to provide accounting oversight and could do so only if he was not on the Board.

About the first of March, ML&RS mailed the brochures. Initially they told Terry the first reunion usually has about 40 attendees but with the reunion in San Diego, 10 more guys may come. But the King reservations were coming at a record rate when the first week the brochures hit the mail!

By end of March the required money had been raised to order more merchandise to be sold at the first reunion.

The May 20, 2002 Room reservation cut-off date with ML&RS arrived with 90 confirmed reservations. They told Terry this will be the largest first reunion for a destroyer in this firm&rsquos 15-year history. The Board was excited!

SAN DIEGO - June 23-26, 2002

The Board had determined to arrive Wednesday at 5:00PM so they could finally meet each other before the reunion began&mdashand they weren&rsquot the only ones with approximately five other kingsmen and spouses at the hotel that evening.

Starting Thursday, each day was exciting as more kingsmen arrived and the group continued to grow. In the hospitality room, the personal memorabilia that guys brought with them was collecting, with everything being examined by everyone.

Terry brought two prints of the database: Alphabetical and by rate. These also were very well reviewed and some notations were made.

Oh, the chaos of the first meeting! A microphone was not ordered so the hotel had to bring that before we could start the meeting. The ship&rsquos store was opened the first day and immediately it was learned no order sheets were made so Terry was with the hotel staff designing, confirming and printing order sheets which resulted in his not being in the reunion group shot during the photo session.

NOTE: Friday and Saturday morning social times before breakfast were for meeting those who arrived during the evening and night.

Friday included breakfast, social time, then time to visit the San Diego Zoo, Old Town, or take the Harbor Cruise, ending with a Hawaiian dinner.

Saturday included breakfast, social time, a tour of the Naval base with a tour of the USS Stethem (DDG63), business meeting, (Business meeting was 2:00 &ndash 3:00 PM), reunion book photos, and ended with a formal banquet. Also on Saturday several Board members asked Mike Luppino if he would be willing to give his website address to the King because it was ussking.com versus the Association&rsquos current website with the hyphenation. This was refused.

NOTE: In 2005 Mike closed his website, offered the website address to the Association and the Association determined there was no need for this address, so the Board turned down the website offer.

Sunday included breakfast and final farewells.

When finished, the King&rsquos first reunion had 102 shipmates with 30 guys from the original commissioning crew. There were 94 shipmates from the 1960-1974 DLG and 8 from the 77-91 DDG. With 110 spouses and guests, the group&rsquos total was 212 people! ML&RS was blown away by the success of this event.

With the reunion over, the need for getting a newsletter out right away was recognized by the Board. STG2/STGC Dave Nesbitt 60-62, 65-67 offered his service for this crisis project and published the first issue in September, 2002.

We applied for the IRS Tax ID number on July 17, 2002, and received the number on September 27, 2002.

As an Association we applied for the IRS Tax Exempt Status on September 19, 2002 with a $150.00 check to Department of Revenue to complete the March submission for incorporation as an Association, and received the exemption January 26, 2003.

By October 2002 of the estimated 4400 total crew, Terry had identified 3750 names,established contact with approximately 800 of us, including learning of the passage of some of our shipmates! Three kingsmen requested they receive no further contact from the Association.

The First website May 1998 to October 28, 1998, written by Steve Cuddihy Jr.,
The Second rendition, November 2, 1998 to October 5, 1999
The Third rendition from uss-king.8m.com December 1999 to June 25, 2000
The Fourth rendition and final design by Steve Cuddihy Jr.

The Fifth rendition by Chuck White, November 27, 2001, just a few days after he took the job as webmaster.

All images and information on this site are copyrighted.
Reproduction of any sort is prohibited without express written consent.

The USS King (DLG-10/DDG-41) Association herein after referred to as Association, hereby disclaims all responsibility for any and all claims arising from the misuse, misappropriation, or misrepresentation by others of intellectual property found on this site. All trademarks and servicemarks are the property of their respective owners. Thank you for respecting the rights of copyright holders and of the Association.

© USS King (DLG-10/DDG-41) Association 1999 - 2017 All Rights Reserved
This website is owned and funded under the bylaws of the Association, a Non-profit Organization.

For questions, contact the webmaster


USS Waddell DDG-24 - History

Download this Cruise Book as high resolution .pdf file

Here you can download the USS WADDELL (DDG 24) Cruise Book 1990 as a high resolution .pdf file. You will be able to zoom in to better read names etc. Printing is also easily possible because of the high resolution and the missing watermarks. Please note that the scans in the download are the same images like above, however, they have not been resized. That means that everything that's visible in the scans above will be visible in the .pdf file as well. Click here for a sample page.

  • High Resolution Images, suitable for printing
  • Images are in the book's original order (not sorted like the scans above)
  • No watermarks
  • Double pages with overlapping images will be provided as a single page, not as two separate pages
  • .pdf file, 67 pages, filesize: 64.35 MB
  • $15.00 USD
  • Instant download
  • Click here for a sample page

You are interested in having a hard bound reproduction made of this cruise book? Click here for more information.

After completion of the Paypal check-out you will be redirected to the download page. Additionally, you will also receive an email with the download link after the Paypal check-out. Your download link will then be active for 48 hours before it expires.


Commission Examines Assets that Honor the Confederacy, Will Suggest Name Changes

A Pathfinder-class oceanographic survey ship, USNS Maury (T-AGS-66) in 2020. Maury is named after Commander Matthew Fontaine Maury, the “father of modern oceanography.” He served in the U.S. Navy but was also a Confederate naval officer. U.S. NAVY / LaShawn Sykes

The Department of Defense’s Naming Commission — technically the Commission on the Naming of Items of the Department of Defense that Commemorate the Confederate States of America or Any Person Who Served Voluntarily with the Confederate States of America — has begun its work to examine bases and ships with names tied to the Confederacy and make recommendations for renaming them.

The eight commissioners, chaired by retired Navy Adm. Michelle Howard, were sworn in on March 2 and have begun biweekly meetings. Howard told the press the commission has developed an initial charter to guide the process and is developing renaming procedures and criteria.

The Naming Commission was mandated by Congress under Section 370 of the 2021 National Defense Authorization Act and charged with assigning, modifying or removing anything that commemorates the Confederate States of America or any person who served voluntarily with the Confederacy.

The military services were already contemplating the appropriateness of the eight bases named for Confederate generals who voluntarily fought against the United States — Fort A.P. Hill, Fort Bragg, Fort Lee, Fort Rucker, Fort Benning, Fort Gordon, Fort Hood, Fort Polk and Fort Pickett. A ninth base, Fort Belvoir, was previously named Camp A. A. Humphreys after Civil War Union Army Gen. Andrew A. Humphreys. It was later named for the plantation that existed at that location, which was operated with enslaved people. The commission will investigate if the renaming of that installation was done to possibly commemorate the Confederacy.

Howard said the commission will be visiting the bases throughout the summer and fall and meeting with local stakeholders to gain perspectives and local opinions in regards to renaming assets.

Congress required a commission be appointed, with four of the commissioners to be appointed by the secretary of defense and four by the chairs and ranking members of the House and Senate Armed Services committees.

In his last days in office, then-Acting Defense Secretary Chris Miller announced his picks, but shortly after taking office Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin III replaced Miller’s appointees with his own. In addition to Howard, Austin appointed retired Marine Corps Gen. Bob Neller, Dr. Kori Schake, director of Foreign & Defense Policy Studies at the American Enterprise Institute, and retired Army Brig. Gen. Ty Seidule, emeritus professor of history, U.S. Military Academy.

Beyond the Army bases, there are Navy ships named for Confederate leaders or victories, including the oceanographic ship USNS Maury (T-AGS 66) and guided missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG 62), named for the 1863 battle led by Gen. Robert E. Lee and Gen. Stonewall Jackson. Both those generals were honored by the Navy with the naming of now-decommissioned ballistic missile submarines — USS Robert E. Lee (SSBN 601) and USS Stonewall Jackson (SSBN 634).

Other Navy ships have honored Confederate officers in the past, including guided missile destroyers USS Tattnall (DDG 18), USS Semmes (DDG 18) USS Buchanan (DDG 14) and USS Waddell (DDG 24) guided missile frigate USS Richard L. Page (FFG 5) and submarine tenders USS Dixon (AS 37) and USS Hunley (AS 31).

Matthew Fontaine Maury, for which USNS Maury is named, is less known for his Confederate service than he was for his work before the Civil War as a student of the environment and its impact on navigation. He published “The Physical Geography of the Sea” in 1855 was superintendent of the United States Naval Observatory headed the Navy’s Depot of Charts and Instruments and wrote the Wind and Current Chart of the North Atlantic. His method and format of collecting oceanographic observations became a global standard.

According to Howard, the commission’s mandate is limited to defense assets with names tied to the Confederacy. That means that bases, ships or facilities honoring officials who owned slaves or were segregationists would not fall under the purview of the commission. USS Carl Vinson, for example, is named for a lawmaker who was a staunch support of the Navy, but also a segregationist. USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG 1002) is named for a former president and naval officer who initially supported segregation but later championed the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

In addition to bases, the legislation calls for comprehensive inventory of military assets, such as buildings, street names, parks, ships, aircraft and equipment that in some way commemorate the Confederacy. Grave markers, museums or artifacts within museums are not part of the commission’s mandate, but it may examine displays that may glorify the CSA.

The commission will brief the secretary of defense on its progress and recommendations, and is required to brief the House and Senate Armed Services Committees on its progress by Oct. 1. The commission’s final report is due Oct. 1, 2022.


USS Waddell DDG-24 - History

From Russia with Love!

My name is Alexey Gorelenko, I'm from City of Vladivostok, Russia.

I served in Russian Navy (1989 - 2004), lieutenant-commander. I was navigating officer of crew of nuclear powered ballistic missile submarine of Delta-III class (K-433).

Sea Bag

Plank Owner Story

Simulate Shipboard Life

Reflections of a Blackshoe

*** I liked standing on the bridge wing at sunrise with salt spray in my face and clean ocean winds whipping in from the four quarters of the globe. The ship beneath me feeling like a living thing as her engines drove her swiftly through the sea.
*** I liked the sounds of the Navy - the piercing thrill of the boatswains pipe, the syncopated clangor of the ship's bell on the quarterdeck, the harsh squawk of the 1MC, and the strong language and laughter of sailors at work.
*** I liked Navy vessels -- nervous darting destroyers, plodding fleet auxiliaries and amphibs, sleek submarines and steady solid aircraft carriers.
*** I liked the proud names of Navy ships: Midway, Lexington, Saratoga, Coral Sea, Antietam, Valley Forge - memorials of great battles won and tribulations overcome.
*** I liked the lean angular names of Navy "tin-cans" and escorts - Barney, Dahlgren, Mullinix, McCloy, Damato, Leftwich, Mills - mementos of heroes who went before us and the others - San Jose, San Diego, Los Angeles, St. Paul, Chicago - named for our cities.
*** My ships Washoe County, Windham County, Terrell County, Saratoga, Dale, and Richmond K Turner. Also don't forget Porter and William D Porter.
*** I liked the tempo of a Navy band blaring through the topside speakers as we pulled away from the oiler after refueling at sea.
*** I liked Liberty Call and the spicy scent of a foreign port.
*** I even liked the never-ending paperwork and all-hands working parties as my ship filled herself with the multitude of supplies, both critical and mundane in order to cut ties to the land and carry out her mission anywhere on the globe where there was water to float her.
*** I liked sailors, officers and enlisted men from all parts of the land, farms of the Midwest, small towns of New England, from the cities, the mountains and the prairies, from all walks of life. I trusted and depended on them as they trusted and depended on me - for professional competence, for comradeship, for strength and courage. In a word, they were "shipmates" then and forever.
*** I liked the surge of adventure in my heart, when the word was passed: "Now set the special sea and anchor detail - all hands to quarters for leaving port," and I liked the infectious thrill of sighting home again, with the waving hands of welcome from family and friends waiting pier side.
*** The work was hard and dangerous the going rough at times the parting from loved ones painful, but the companionship of robust Navy laughter, the "all for one and one for all" philosophy of the sea was ever present.
*** I liked the serenity of the sea after a day of hard ship's work, as flying fish flitted across the wave tops and sunset gave way to night.
*** I liked the feel of the Navy in darkness - the masthead and range lights, the red and green navigation lights and stern light, the pulsating phosphorescence of radar repeaters - they cut through the dusk and joined with the mirror of stars overhead. And I liked drifting off to sleep lulled by the myriad noises large and small that told me that my ship was alive and well, and that my shipmates on watch would keep me safe.
*** I liked quiet mid watches with the aroma of strong coffee – the lifeblood of the Navy permeating everywhere.
*** And I liked hectic watches when the exacting minuet of haze-gray shapes racing at flank speed kept all hands on a razor edge of alertness.
*** I liked the sudden electricity of "General quarters, general quarters, all hands man your battle stations," followed by the hurried clamor of running feet on ladders and the resounding thump of watertight doors as the ship transformed herself in a few brief seconds from a peaceful workplace to A weapon of war - ready for anything.
*** And I liked the sight of space-age equipment manned by youngsters clad in dungarees and sound-powered phones that their grandfathers would still recognize.
*** I liked the traditions of the Navy and the men and women who made them. I liked the proud names of Navy heroes: Halsey, Nimitz, Perry, Farragut, John Paul Jones and Burke. A sailor could find much in the Navy: Comrades-in-arms, pride in self and country, mastery of the seaman's trade. An adolescent could find adulthood.
*** In years to come, when sailors are home from the sea, they will still remember with fondness and respect the ocean in all its moods – the impossible shimmering mirror calm and the storm-tossed green water surging over the bow. And then there will come again a faint whiff of stack gas, a faint echo of engine and rudder orders, a vision of the bright bunting of signal flags snapping at the yardarm, a refrain of hearty laughter in the wardroom and Chief's quarters and mess decks.
*** Gone ashore for good they will grow wistful about their Navy days, when the seas belonged to them and a new port of call was ever over the horizon.
*** Remembering this, they will stand taller and say, "I WAS A SAILOR ONCE. I WAS A PART OF THE NAVY, AND THE NAVY WILL ALWAYS BE A PART OF ME."

'67 Operation Sea Dragon

I as many other former veterans do have this obstruction in our brains about “our” stories because we find them insignificant compared to our brothers that gave their lives in war or operations for our country no matter the war or conflict. For myself I have a great feeling for our veterans who did return home scarred, maimed and disfigured for life. I admire those veterans very much. I think of them daily. I was lucky….the times we were fired upon…most of us never received a scratch. Again, we were the lucky ones.

The ships log should confirm most of this action but does not translate to what I and other sailors on the Waddell especially gunners mates, bridge personnel and people assigned to Combat Information Center (CIC) witnessed during this incident. I was assigned the surface radar in CIC during general quarters and witnessed these happenings.

It was late March 1967 and the USS Waddell (DDG24) had been released by Operations Tactical Command (OTC) of COMPHIBRON One aboard the USS Princeton (LPH5), to proceed to the north Tonkin Gulf to conduct Sea Dragon patrols. Sea Dragon Patrols were intended to interdict waterborne communication and logistic craft (WBLC) targets and stopping the flow of troops and supplies on shore. Sea Dragon Patrols were carried out by Destroyers and Cruisers.

The Waddell departed the area after performing (NGFS) naval gunfire support for the Marines and their ARVN counterparts south of the DMZ in the mouth of the Cua Viet River on operation Beacon Hill. Most of us were not aware that the intense build up of NVN troops and the stepped up exchange of fire with shore guns was to be later seen in the TET offensive in late 1967 and early 1968. The Marines along the DMZ were in battles and fire fights daily with the North Vietnamese Army and sappers units filtering south helping to clear the way.

Within hours of leaving the Cua Viet area the Waddell linked up with the USS Cunningham (DD752) and proceeded to conduct Sea Dragon Patrols just north of the DMZ near Dong Hoi, North Vietnam a staging area for North Vietnamese troops and logistics moving south. As stated above, Sea Dragon Patrols were geared to stop infiltration of men and equipment along the coastal supply routes both in country and along the coastal waterways. The missions included various shore targets…. radar sites, artillery, troop concentrations, ammunition storage, and staging areas to list a few along with harassment fire. We had been in Vietnam long enough to know that things could change quickly.

It was near the end of the winter monsoon season where the weather is a little cooler with rain and drizzle, low cloud cover and fog. On days when the weather was more accommodating we had the targets designated by Navy A1 Sky raiders or S2 trackers. At times the Army O1 Bird Dogs. We also had the luxury of having Combat Air Patrols (CAP) in the area for assistance if it became necessary.

During the last two days in March the Waddell and Cunningham (along with the USS Cogswell (DD651) until relieved to other duties) took on troop concentrations and staging areas around Vinh Linh in the southern most part of North Vietnam receiving shore battery fire on several occasions. These duals with the North Vietnamese batteries were usually short and intense.

As the fast movers broke into the Gulf and proceeded in our direction at a distance of 9000 yards the Waddell fired one 5” 54 caliber round at the leading three craft. Normally before any surface craft would get close to a Warship the craft would be identified and most likely engaged by our CAP aircraft. With the low visibility, fog and rain our CAP assistance was of little use even though they were available in the area. Another hindrance was the FMC were closing fast and little time was available to use any assistance from others other than the Cunningham. As the first round hit near the first FMC craft the Radarman could see the echo of the splash on his surface radar. Using this gift of the rounds hitting the water on our surface radars each time we fired the Radarman on our surface radar and the gunners mate on Mount 51 walked our ships gunfire onto the leading craft and sunk the first three almost immediately. The remaining four craft retreated back into the tributary. Assuming they were hidden by a small jetty at the mouth of the tributary was a mortal mistake for the FMC crews. The Waddell continued to walk the 5”54 rounds on the craft until all but one had disappeared. The seventh craft melted into the shore line on up into the tributary. As was the SOP (standard operating procedure) for unidentified surface craft the FMC went into the log as “Waterborne Logistic Craft”.

Even with measures to run quite our ECM (Electronic Counter Measure Equipment) showed shore based fire control was following us up the coast both in North Vietnam and Hainan in China. The Waddell, Canberra and the Obrien moved northward to the area of the Song Ma River which leads from North Vietnam down past the infamous Thanh Hoa Bridge and into the Tonkin Gulf.

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Watch the video: 1992 Waddell Decommissioning (December 2021).