History Podcasts

Bittern AM-36 - History

Bittern AM-36 - History

Bittern

Bittern is a bird of the heron family.

I

(AM-36; dp. 840; 1. 187'10" ; b. 35'6" ; dr. 9'10" ; s. 14 k.
cpl. 72; a. 2 3";cl. Lapwing)

The first Bittern (AM-36) was launched 15 February 1919 by Alabama Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Co., Mobile, Ala.; sponsored by Mrs. C. R. Doll; and commissioned 28 May 1919, Lieutenant W. P. Bachmann in command.

Bittern's first duty was as tender to the captured German submarine U-88 while she made an exhibition tour of the Gulf and west coast ports. In January 1920 Bittern sailed for the Par East where she remained for the rest of her active service. Throughout most of the next 21 years she wintered at Cavite, Philippine Islands, and summered at Chefoo, China. But the routine was broken occasionally by assignment to scientific expeditions and in September 1923 by relief work following the Yokohama, Japan, earthquake.

The Japanese air raid on Cavite Navy Yard 10 December 1941 found Bittern undergoing repairs. Although not hit, Bittern suffered extensive damage from fire, near misses, and flying debris from Sealion (SS-195) moored alongside. Too badly damaged for repair, the minesweeper was scuttled in Manila Bay after her crew had transferred to Quail (AM-15).

Bittern received one battle star for her short service in World War II.

Bittern (AM-352) was launched by Willamette Iron and Steel Corp., Portland, Oreg., 21 June 1944 but cancelled 1 November 1945 prior to completion.


Bittern AM-36 - History

DESTROYER DIVISION THIRTY-EIGHT
Commander William A. Glassford

TRACY (DD-214) (F)
Cmdr. William A. Glassford
SMITH THOMPSON (DD-212)
Lt. Cmdr. V. L. Kirman
WHIPPLE (DD-217)
Cmdr. Frank Jack Fletcher
BORIE (DD-215)
Lt. Cmdr. L. C. Scheibla
BARKER (DD-213)
Lt. D. M. Steece
JOHN D. EDWARDS (DD-216)
Cmdr. W. H. Lee

STEWART (DD-224) (F)
Lt. Cmdr. H. B. McCleary

SUBMARINE DIVISION EIGHTEEN
Commander R. C. Needham

S-2 (SS-106)
Lt. William S. Popham, jr.
S-14 (SS-119)
Lt. J. J. Twomey
S-15 (SS-120)
Lt. (j.g.) C. C. Dyer
S-16 (SS-121)
Lt. L. W. Busby jr.
S-17 (SS-122)
Lt. R. S. Barrett

SUBMARINE DIVISION TWELVE
Commander William L. Friedell

S-3 (SS-107)**
Lt. G. Hutchins
S-4 (SS-109)
Lt. Humbert W. Ziroli
S-6 (SS-111)
Lt. J. P. Conover
S-7 (SS-112)
Lt. R. T. S. Gladden
S-8 (SS-113)
Lt. B. S. Killmaster
S-9 (SS-114)
Lt. Herbert B. Knowles

DESTROYER DIVISION FORTY-FIVE
Captain C. S. Freeman

PREBLE (DD-345) (F)
Capt. C. S. Freeman
HULBERT (DD-342)
Lt. Cmdr. Frank A. Braisted
NOA (DD-343)
Cmdr. R. A. Thebald
WILLIAM B PRESTON (DD-344)
Lt. Cmdr. Willis A. Lee, jr.
SICARD (DD-346)
Lt. Cmdr. L. W. Comstock
PRUITT (DD-347)
Cmdr. H. W. McCormack

DESTROYER DIVISION FORTY-THREE
.

PEARY (DD-226) (F)
Cmdr. J. S. Abbott
JOHN D. FORD (DD-228)
Lt. Cmdr. H. H. Frost
PILLSBURY (DD-227)
Lt. Cmdr. H. V. McKittrick
POPE (DD-225)
Lt. Cmdr. H. M. Lammers
TRUXTUN (DD-229)
Lt. Cmdr. T. H. Winters
PAUL JONES (DD-230)
Lt. Cmdr. Howard A. Flanigan

RIZAL (DM-14) (F)
Cmdr. W. E. Hall
HART (DM-8)
Lt. Cmdr. G. C. Barnes
BITTERN (AM-36)
Lt. E. H. Geiselman
FINCH (AM-9)
Lt. L. F. Safford


Bittern AM-36 - History


1941 1942
Keel was laid Launched by Dr. Aurelia H. Reinhardt


January February March April May June
July August September October November December


January February March April May June
July August September October November December



PACIFIC AREA WW II
HISTORY 1941-42

THANKS TO UNITED STATES NAVAL CHRONOLOGY, WORLD WAR II

I have edited the above files for the South Pacific area only.The edited text is shown in BLACK.

HISTORY OF THE USS OAKLAND TEXT IN BLUE

02/01 Sat. Navy announces reorganization of United States Fleet: old names Atlantic Fleet and Pacific Fleet revived Asiatic Fleet remains unchanged. Adm. H. E. Kimmel relieves Adm. J. O. Richardson as Commander in Chief United States Pacific Fleet, with additional duty as Command in Chief United States Fleet Patrol Force, United States Fleet, becomes Atlantic Fleet and Adm. E. J. King becomes Commander in Chief United States Atlantic Fleet Adm. T. C. Hart continues as Commander in Chief United States Asiatic Fleet.

04/09 Wed. Battleship NORTH CAROLINA (BB-55) is commissioned at Philadelphia, Pa.

06/02 Mon. LONG ISLAND (AVG-1), the first escort carrier, is commissioned at Newport News, Va.

Navy. 284,427 Marine Corps. 54,359

07/15 The KEEL of USS OAKLAND CL-95 was laid on the ways of Bethlehem Steel Company, San Francisco, California.

09/27 Sat. First Liberty Ship, SS PATRICK HENRY, is launched at Baltimore, Md.

10/20 Mon. Carrier HORNET (CV-8) is commissioned at Norfolk, Va.

Navy. 2,004 Marine Corps. 108 Army. 222

[Personnel casualty statistics for the Pearl Harbor attack have been revised several times after evaluation of new data. The figures presented here were compiled in 1955 from official sources.] Japanese lose 5 midget submarines, 28 aircraft, and fewer than 100 men. Midway Island is bombarded by two Japanese destroyers. President orders mobilization. Japanese declaration of war reaches Washington, D. C. United States naval vessels sunk by air attack: Battleship OKLAHOMA (BB-37). Battleship ARIZONA (BB-39). Battleship CALIFORNIA (BB-44). Battleship WEST VIRGINA (BB-48). [All ships sunk, except ARIZONA, OKLAHOMA, and UTAH, were raised, repaired, and subsequently returned to service.] MinelayerOGALA (CM-4) . Target ship UTAH (AG-16) . United States naval vessels damaged: Battleship NEVADA (BB-36). Battleship PENNSYLVANIA (BB-38). Battleship TENNESSEE (BB-43). Battleship MARYLAND (BB-46). Light cruiser RALEIGH (CL-7). Light cruiser HONOLULU (CL-48). Light cruiser HELENA (CL-50). Destroyer CASSIN (DD-372). Destroyer SHAW (DD-373). Destroyer DOWNES (DD-375). Seaplane tender CURTISS (AV-4). Repair ship VESTAL (AR-4). Japanese naval vessels lost: 5 midget submarines.

12/08 Mon. United States declares war on Japan. Striking Force, Asiatic Fleet (Rear Adm. W. A. Glassford) departs Iloilo, P. I., for Makassar Strait, Netherlands East Indies. Japanese aircraft in widely scattered operations bomb Guam, Wake, Hong Kong, Singapore, and the Philippine Islands. Extensive damage is inflicted on United States Army aircraft at Clark Field, Luzon, P. I. Japanese forces land on Batan Island, north of Luzon, P. I., and on east coast of Malay Peninsula. Japan interns United States Marines and nationals at Shanghai and Tientsin, China.

12/09 Tue. Japanese occupy Bangkok, Thailand. Japanese land on Tarawa and Makin, Gilbert Islands. China declares war on Japan, Germany, and Italy.

12/10 Wed. Cavite Navy Yard, P. I., is heavily damaged by enemy air attack. Guam surrenders to Japanese landing force. Japanese land on Camiguin Island and at Gonzaga and Aparri, Luzon, P. I. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer PEARY (DD-226), by horizontal bomber. Submarine SEADRAGON (SS-194), by horizontal bomber. Submarine SEALION (SS-195), by horizontal bomber. Minesweeper BITTERN (AM-36), by horizontal bomber. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Submarine I-170, by carrier-based aircraft, Hawaiian Islands area, 23 d. 45' N., 155 d. 35' W. Minesweeper No. 10, by Army aircraft, Philippine Islands area, 17 d. 32' N., 120 d. 22' E. Minesweeper No. 19, damaged by Army aircraft and grounded by own forces (total loss), Philippine Islands area, 18 d. 22, N., 121 d. 38'. E.

12/11 Thu. Germany and Italy declare war on the United States. United States declare war on Germany and Italy. Japanese make landings at Legaspi, Luzon, P. I. Marines on Wake Island repulse Japanese landing attempt and sink two enemy destroyers. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Destroyer HAYATE, by Marine shore batteries. Destroyer KISARAGI, by Marine aircraft.

12/17 Wed. Rear Adm. C. W. Nimitz is ordered to relieve Adm. H. E. Kimmel as Commander in Chief Pacific Fleet, with rank of Admiral Vice Adm. W. S. Pye becomes acting Commander in Chief Pacific Fleet, pending arrival of Admiral Nimitz. Japanese land at Miri, Sarawak, Borneo.

12/20 Sat. Adm. E. J. King is designated Commander in Chief United States Fleet with headquarters in the Navy Department, Washington, D. C.

12/23 Tue. Wake Island, which had been subjected to prolonged enemy bombing, surrenders to Japanese invasion force.

12/24 Wed. Japanese land at Lamon Bay, Luzon, P. I.

12/25 Thu. Adm. T. C. Hart turns over all remaining naval forces in the Philippine Islands to Rear Adm. F. W. Rockwell Admiral Hart departs in submarine for Java to establish new headquarters of Asiatic Fleet. British surrender Hong Kong.

12/29 Mon. Corregidor, P. I., is bombed for first time by Japanese aircraft. United States naval vessels damaged: Submarine tender CANOPUS (AS-9), by horizontal bomber, Philippine Islands area, 14 d. 25' N., 120 d. 20' E.

12/30 Tue. Adm. E. J. King assumes duties as Commander in Chief United States Fleet.

12/31 Wed. Adm. C. W. Nimitz assumes command of Pacific Fleet.

Thanks to United States Naval Chronology, World War II

01/01 Thu. Adm. R. E. Ingersoll succeeds Adm. E. J. King as Commander in Chief Atlantic Fleet.

01/02 Fri. Manila and Cavite, P. I., fall to the Japanese.

01/06 Tue. Japanese amphibious force occupies Brunei Bay, Borneo.

01/11 Sun. Japanese begin invasion of Netherlands East Indies by landings at Tarakan and Jesselton, Borneo Menado and Kema, Celebes. United States naval vessels damaged: Carrier SARATOGA (CV-3), by submarine torpedo, 500 miles southwest of Oahu, T. H.

01/21 Wed. United States naval vessels damaged: Light cruiser BOISE (CL-47), by grounding, Sape Strait, Netherlands East Indies.

01/23 Fri. Japanese land at Balikpapan, Borneo. Japanese occupy Rabaul, New Britain, and land at Kieta, Bougainville, Solomon Islands.

01/24 Sat. Battle of Balikpapan (Battle of Makassar Strait): Japanese Borneo invasion convoy undergoes night torpedo attack off Balikpapan, Borneo, by destroyer division (Cdr. P. H. Talbot) composed of PARROTT (DD-218), POPE (DD-225), JOHN. D. FORD (DD-228), and PAUL JONES (DD-230) four enemy transports and a patrol craft are sunk. Japanese land at Kendari, Celebes Kavieng, New Ireland Subic Bay, P. I. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer JOHN D. FORD (DD-228) by naval gunfire, Netherlands East Indies area, 12 d. 00' S., 117 d. 01' E.

01/28 Wed. Japanese land on Rossel Island off New Guinea.

01/29 Thu. Japanese land at Badoeng Island and Mampawan, Celebes. Japanese land at Amboina Island, Netherlands East Indies.

02/01 Sun. Two carrier task forces (Vice Adm. W. F. Halsey and Rear Adm. F. J. Fletcher) and a bombardment group (Rear Adm. R. A. Spruance), totaling 2 aircraft carriers, 5 cruisers, and 10 destroyers, attack Kwajalein, Wotje, Maloelap, Jaluit, and Mili in the Marshall Islands and Makin, Gilbert Islands. United States naval vessels damaged: Carrier ENTERPRISE (CV-6), by suicide bomber, Marshall-Gilberts raid. 10 d. 33' N., 171 d. 53' E. Heavy cruiser CHESTER (CA-27), by dive bomber, Marshall-Gilberts raid. 08 d. 45' N., 171 d. 33' E. 02/04 Wed. Japanese aircraft bomb allied force (Rear Adm. K. W. F. M. Doorman, Royal Netherlands Navy) of 4 cruisers and accompanying destroyers attempting transit of Madoera Strait to attack Japanese Borneo invasion fleet: United States naval vessels damaged: Heavy Cruiser HOUSTON (CA-30), by horizontal bombers. Light cruiser MARBLEHEAD (CL-12), by horizontal bombers. 07 d. 23' S., 115 d. 47' E. Japanese troops land at Gasmata, New Britain. Japanese forces land on Sumatra, Netherlands East Indies.

02/19 Thu. Bali, Netherlands East Indies, is invaded by the Japanese. Battle of Badoeng Strait starts at night and continues the next day. Allied naval force (Rear Adm. K. W. F. M. Doorman, Royal Netherlands Navy) of three cruisers and accompanying destroyers attack retiring Japanese Bali occupation force in Badoeng Strait.

02/20 Fri. Japanese invade Timor Island in the Netherlands East Indies. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer STEWART (DD-224), by naval gunfire, Battle of Badoeng Strait. 07 d. 18' S., 112 d. 46' E. 02/27 Fri. Battle of Java Sea is fought as Allied naval force (Read Adm. K. W. F. M. Doorman, Royal Netherlands Navy) of 5 cruisers and 11 destroyers in Java Sea near Surabaya attacks enemy force covering Java invasion convoy. United States naval vessel damaged: Heavy Cruiser HOUSTON (CA-30), by naval gunfire.

03/01 Sun. Battle of Sunda Strait which commenced shortly before midnight 28 February 1942 continues. After the Battle of the Java Sea (see 27 February 1942) Allied vessels heading for Sunda Strait are attacked by superior Japanese surface forces. United States naval vessels sunk: Heavy Cruiser HOUSTON (CA-30) , by torpedoes and gunfire. 05 d. 50' S., 105 D. 55' E. Destroyer POPE (DD-225) , by dive bomber, and surface gunfire. 04 d. 00' S., 111 d. 30' E. Destroyer EDSALL (DD-219) , by naval gunfire, south of Christmas Island, Destroyer PILLSBURY (DD-227) , by naval gunfire, south of Christmas Island, 14 d. 30' S., 106 d. 30' E. Oiler PECOS (AO-6) , by dive bomber, south of Christmas Island, 14 d. 27' S., 106 d. 11' E.

03/08 Sun. Japanese forces invade Lae and Salamaua, New Guinea.

03/10 Tue. Aircraft from carriers LEXINGTON (CV-2) and YORKTOWN (CV-5) bomb Japanese shipping at Salamaua and Lae, New Guinea. Japanese invade Finschhafen, New Guinea.(See 26 March 1942).

03/20 Fri. Battleship South Dakota (BB-57) is commissioned at New York, N. Y.

03/29 Sun. Marines arrive at Efate, New Hebrides.

03/30 Mon. Christmas Island is occupied by Japanese forces.

04/01 Wed. Japanese occupy Buka Island, Solomon Islands.

04/03 Fri. Adm. C. W. Nimitz, USN, is named Commander in Chief Pacific Ocean Areas (CINCPOA) Admiral Nimitz is also Commander in Chief Pacific Fleet (CINCPAC).

04/09 Thu. United States-Philippine forces on Bataan, P. I., surrender to the Japanese.

04/18 Sat. Vice Adm. W. F. Halsey in carrier HORNET (CV-8) launches 16 Army B-25's (Lt. Col. J. H. Doolittle) at point over 650 miles east of Honshu, Japan bombers hit Tokyo, Yokosuka, Yokohoma, Kobe, and Nagoya, Japan.

04/30 Thu.Battleship INDIANA (BB-58) is commissioned at Newport News, Va.

05/02 Sat. Japanese land on Florida Island, Solomon Islands.

05/04 Mon. Battle of the Coral Sea (4-8 May) commences with an air strike on Tulagi, Solomon Islands, by United States carrier-based aircraft. Allied naval forces (Rear Adm. F. J. Fletcher, USN) comprise:

Attack Group (Rear Adm. T. C. Kinkaid, USN) of United States cruisers CHESTER (CA-27), NEW ORLEANS (CA-32), PORTLAND (CA-33), ASTORIA (CA-34), MINNEAPOLIS (CA-36). Destroyers FARRAGUT (DD-348), DEWEY (DD-340), MONAGHAN (DD-354), AYLWIN (DD-355) and PHELPS (DD-360).

Support Group (Rear Adm. J. G. Crace, RN) with United States cruiser CHICAGO (CA-29), Australian cruisers AUSTRALIA and HOBART. United States Destroyers PERKINS (DD-377) and WALKE (DD- 416).

Carrier Group (Rear Adm. A. W. Fitch, USN) consisting of United States carriers LEXINGTON (CV-2) and YORKTOWN (CV-5). Destroyers ANDERSON (DD-411), HAMMANN (DD-412), RUSSELL (DD-414), and MORRIS (DD-417).

Fueling Group (Capt. J. S. Phillips, USN) including United States oilers TIPPECANOE (AO-21) and NEOSHO (A0-23). Destroyers WORDEN (DD-352) and SIMS (DD-409).

Japanese naval vessel sunk: Destroyer KIKUZUKI, by carrier-based aircraft, Tulagi, Solomon Islands.

05/05 Tue. Rear Adm. F. J. Fletcher's Allied force, after fueling, changes course to intercept Japanese Port Moresby Invasion Group (Battle of Coral Sea, 4-8 May). Japanese forces land on Corregidor, P. I.

05/06 Wed. Rear Adm. F. J. Fletcher's Allied force is steaming on course to intercept Japanese Port Moresby Invasion Group (Battle of Coral Sea, 4-8 May). Corregidor and Manila Bay forts, P. I., surrender to the Japanese.

05/07 Thu. Rear Adm. F. J. Fletcher's Allied force turns north to engage Japanese Attack Group. Support Group (Rear Adm. Crace, RN) is detached to intercept enemy Port Moresby Invasion Group. Admiral Crace's ships are attacked by enemy torpedo bombers and land-based bombers and, mistaken for Japanese Port Moresby Invasion Force, are bombed by Army B-26 aircraft. Carrier aircraft attack Japanese Support Group and sink aircraft carrier SHOHO (Battle of the Coral Sea, 4-8 May). United States naval vessel sunk: Destroyer SIMS (DD-409) , by dive bomber. 15 d. 10' S., 158 d. 05' E. United States naval vessel damaged: Oiler NEOSHO (AO-23), by dive bomber, and sunk by Unites States forces 11 May 1942. 15 d. 10' S., 158 d. 05' E., Japanese naval vessel sunk: Carrier SHOHO, by carrier-based aircraft, 10 d. 29' S., 152 d. 55' E. Hollandia, New Guinea, is occupied by Japanese forces.

05/08 Fri. Carrier LEXINGTON (CV-2) search aircraft sight Japanese carriers SHOKAKU and ZUIKAKU. Rear Adm. F. J. Fletcher's carrier aircraft damage SHOKAKU and force her retirement. At the same time, Japanese aircraft hit carriers YORKTOWN (CV-5) and LEXINGTON (CV-2), damaging the latter to such an extent that destroyer PHELPS (DD-360) is ordered to sink her. (Battle of the Coral Sea 4-8 May.) [This is the first battle in modern naval history in which opposing warships did not exchange a shot all damage was inflicted by carrier aircraft. Coral Sea was a strategic United States victory. The heretofore uninterrupted Japanese push southeastward was halted.] United States naval vessel sunk: Carrier LEXINGTON (CV-2) , severely damaged by carrier-based torpedo bombers and, in sinking condition, sunk by United States forces. 15 d. 12 S., 155 d. 27' E. United States naval vessel damaged: Carrier YORKTOWN (CV-5), by carrier-based dive bombers. 14 d. 35' S., 155 d. 15' E.

05/12 Tue. Battleship MASSACHUSETTS (BB-59) is commissioned at Boston, Mass.

05/28 Thu. United States forces arrive at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides Islands.

06/02 Tue. Two carrier task forces (Rear Adm. F. J. Fletcher and Rear Adm. R. A. Spruance) rendezvous about 350 miles northeast of Midway Island. [Composition of United States naval forces at the Battle of Midway was as follows:]

Rear Adm. F. J. Fletcher (Task Force 17) - Carrier YORKTOWN (CV-5), Heavy cruiser PORTLAND (CA-33) and ASTORIA (CA-34). Destroyers HUGHES (DD-410), ANDERSON (DD-411), HAMMANN (DD-412), RUSSELL (DD-414), MORRIS (DD-417), and GWIN (DD-433)

Rear Adm. R. A. Spruance (Task Force 16) - Carriers ENTERPRISE (CV-6) and HORNET (CV-8), Heavy cruiser PENSACOLA (CA-24), NORTHAMPTON (CA-26), NEW ORLEANS (CA-32), MINNEAPOLIS (CA-36), and VINCENNES (CA-44), Light cruiser ATLANTA (CL-51), Destroyers DEWEY (DD-349), WORDEN (DD-352), MONAGHAN (DD-354), AYLWIN (DD-355), PHELPS (DD-360) BALCH (DD-363), CONYNGHAM (DD-371), BENHAM (DD-397), ELLET (DD-398), MAURY (DD-401), and MONSSEN (DD-436), Oilers CIMARRON (AO-22), and PLATTE (AO-24).

Submarines on patrol and scouting duty NARWHAL (SS-167), NAUTILUS (SS-168), DOLPHIN (SS-169), CACHALOT (SS-170), CUTTLEFISH (SS-171), PIKE (SS-173), TARPON (SS-175), PLUNGER (SS-179), TAMBOR (SS-198), TROUT (SS-202), GRAYLING (SS-209), GRENADIER (SS-210), GUDGEON (SS-211), GATO (SS-212), GROUPER (SS-214), GROWLER (SS-215), FLYING FISH (SS-229), FINBACK (SS-230), and TRIGGER (SS-237).]

06/03 Wed. Midway-based aircraft locate and attack transports of Japanese Combined Fleet (Admiral Yamamoto) about 600 miles west of Midway Island.

06/04 Thu. Battle of Midway (4-6 June) opens as aircraft from four Japanese carriers strike Midway Island installations, which are defended by Marine and Army aircraft. Carrier task forces (Rear Adm. F. J. Fletcher and Rear Adm. R. A. Spruance) launch aircraft from carriers ENTERPRISE (CV-6) , HORNET (CV-6), and YORKTOWN (CV-5) which hit four Japanese carriers. YORKTOWN is disabled by Japanese carrier aircraft. Admiral Yamamoto abandons Midway plans and retires westward. United States naval vessel damaged: Carrier YORKTOWN (CV-5), by carrier-based aircraft. 33 d. 51' N., 177 d. 01' W. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Carrier KAGA, by carrier-based aircraft. 30 d. 23' N., 177 d. 01' W. Carrier SORYU, by carrier-based aircraft and submarine NAUTILUS (SS-168). 30 d. 42' N., 179 d. 37' W.

06/05 Fri. Carrier task force (Rear Adm. R. A. Spruance) pursues Japanese fleet westward (Battle of Midway, 4-6 June). Japanese naval vessels sunk: Carrier AKAGI, damaged by carrier-based aircraft, Battle of Midway, sunk by own forces, 30 d. 30' N., 179 d. 40' W. Carrier HIRYU, damaged by carrier-based aircraft, Battle of Midway, sunk by own forces, 31 d. 28 N., 179 d. 24' E.

06/06 Sat. Aircraft from carriers ENTERPRISE (CV-6) and HORNET (CV-8) attack Japanese force retiring from Midway. After recovering aircraft, United States force changes course eastward to refuel and breaks contact with the enemy (Battle of Midway, 4-6 June). [Battle of Midway was one of the most decisive battles in naval history. It was the turning point of the Pacific War. In addition to the crippling loss of four aircraft carriers, the Japanese suffered the loss of a large percentage of their most highly trained and battle-experienced carrier pilots. (See 2 to 6 June 1942).] United States naval vessel sunk: Destroyer HAMMANN (DD-412) , by submarine torpedo. 30 d. 36' N., 176 d. 34' w. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Heavy cruiser MIKUMA, by naval carrier-based aircraft and Marine land-based aircraft. 30 d. 00' N., 173 d. 00' E.

Navy. 640,570 Marine Corps. 143,528

07/21 Tue. Japanese land and occupy Buna, New Guinea.

07/30 Thu. Women's Naval Reserve (WAVES) is established.

08/07 Fri. Marines land on Florida, Tulagi, Gavutu, Tanambogo, and Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, in the first American land offensive of the war. Under cover of naval surface and air forces (Vice Adm. F. J. Fletcher), the 1st Marine Division (Maj. Gen. A. A. Vandegrift) is put ashore by Amphibious Force, South Pacific (Rear Adm. R. K. Turner). The landings are supported by carrier and shore-based aircraft (Rear Adm. L. Noyes and Rear Adm. J. S. McCain). The overall commander is Vice Adm. R. L. Ghormley, Commander South Pacific, and the officer in tactical command is Vice Adm. F. J. Fletcher. Naval cruiser and destroyer force (Rear Adm. W. W. Smith) bombards Kiska, Aleutian Islands. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer MUGFORD (DD-389), by dive bomber, Solomon Islands area, 09 d. 00' S., 160 d. 00' E.

08/08 Sat. Marines win control of Tulagi, Gavutu, and Tanambogo, Solomon Islands. An unfinished enemy air strip on Guadalcanal is captured and renamed Henderson Field. United States naval vessel sunk: Transport GEORGE F. ELLIOTT (AP-13) , damaged by suicide bombers, Solomon Islands area, and sunk by United States forces, 09 d. 10' S., 160, 10' E. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer JARVIS (DD-393), by aircraft torpedo, Solomon Islands area, 09 d. 10' S., 160 d. 01 E.

08/09 Sun. Battle of Savo Island commences in the darkness as a Japanese force of 7 cruisers and 1 destroyer approaches west of Savo Island, Solomon Islands, undetected. The enemy sinks 4 Allied cruisers and damages 1 other cruiser and 2 destroyers by torpedo and gunfire before retiring. Allied ships depart Guadalcanal area. Japanese vessels temporarily control waters around Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands. United States naval vessels sunk: Heavy Cruisers ASTORIA (CA-34), QUINCY (CA-39), and VINCENNES (CA-44) , by naval gunfire, [Fourth cruiser sunk was the Australian ship CANBERRA .] Destroyer JARVIS (DD-393) , by aircraft attack, Solomon Islands, 09 d. 42' S., 158 d. 59' E. United States naval vessels damaged: Heavy cruiser CHICAGO (CA-29), by destroyer torpedo Destroyers RALPH TALBOT (DD-390) and PATTERSON (DD-392), by naval gunfire.

08/16 Sun. Battleship ALABAMA (BB-60) is commissioned at Portsmouth, Va.

08/17 Mon. Second Raider Battalion ("Carlson's Raiders"), Marine Corps, transported by submarines NAUTILUS (SS-168) and ARGONAUT (APS-1) raids Makin Island in the Gilbert Islands Nautilus gunfire supports Marines ashore.

08/24 Mon. Battle of the Eastern Solomons begins and continues into the next day. Naval carrier-based aircraft (Vice Adm. F. J. Fletcher) supported by Marine and Army aircraft turn back major Japanese attempt to recapture Guadalcanal and Tulagi, Solomon Islands. United States naval vessel damaged: Carrier ENTERPRISE (CV-6), by dive bomber. 08 d. 38 S., 163 d. 30 ' E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Carrier RYUJO, by carrier-based aircraft. 06 d. 10' S., 160 d. 50' E.

08/25 Tue. Japanese occupy Nauru, Gilbert Islands, and Goodenough Island, off southeast coast of New Guinea. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Destroyer MUZUKI, by Army aircraft, Battle of Eastern Solomons.

08/30 Sun. United States Naval and Army forces occupy Adak, Aleutian Islands, for air and naval base. United States naval vessel sunk: High speed transport CALHOUN (APD-2) , by horizontal bomber, Solomon Islands area, 09 d. 24' S., 160 d. 01' E.

08/31 Mon. United States naval vessel damaged: Carrier SARATOGA (CV-3), by submarine torpedo, 260 miles southeast of Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, 10 d. 34' S., 164 d. 18' E.

09/05 Sat. United States naval vessels sunk: High speed transports GREGORY (APD-3) and LITTLE (APD-4) , by surface ship gunfire, Solomon Islands area, 09 d. 20' S., 160 d. 01' E.

09/06 Sun. United States naval vessel damaged: Battleship SOUTH DAKOTA (BB-57), by hitting coral reef, Lahai Passage, Tonga Islands.

09/15 Tue. Carrier task force (Rear Adm. L. Noyes) covering transport of reinforcements from Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, to Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, is attacked by 2 Japanese submarines which sink 1 aircraft carrier and damage a battleship and a destroyer. Japanese battleships bombard Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands. United States naval vessels sunk: Carrier WASP (CV-7) , severely damaged by submarine torpedo, near Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, sunk by United States forces. 12 d. 25' S., 164 d. 08' E. United States naval vessels damaged: Battleship NORTH CAROLINA (BB-55) and destroyer O'BRIEN (DD-415), by submarine torpedoes, near Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides Japanese forces evacuate Attu, Aleutian Islands. (See 30 Oct. 1942.)

09/18 Fri. Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, is reinforced by 7th Marine Regiment.

09/24 Thu. Japanese land on Maiana, Gilbert Islands.

09/25 Fri. Japanese land on Beru, Gilbert Islands.

09/27 Sun. Japanese land on Kuria, Gilbert Islands. 10 d. 47' S., 161 d. 16' E.

09/30 Wed. United States naval vessels damaged: Heavy cruiser SAN FRANCISCO (CA-38) and destroyer BREESE (DD-122), by collision, New Hebrides area, 15 d. 39' S., 167 d. 39' E.]

10/02 Fri. Marines occupy Funafuti, Ellice Islands.

10/05 Mon. Carrier-based aircraft (Rear Adm. G. D. Murrary) bomb Buin-Tonolei area and Faisi, Bougainville, Solomon Islands.

10/11 Sun. Battle of Cape Esperance commences at night and continues on 12 October. Surface forces (Rear Adm. N. Scott) attack enemy cruisers and destroyers headed for Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, on the "Tokyo Express." Two United States cruisers and two destroyers are damaged. One Japanese destroyer is sunk two cruisers and one destroyer are damaged. United States naval vessels damaged: Heavy cruiser SALT LAKE CITY (CA-25), by naval gunfire. Light cruiser BOISE (CL-47), by naval gunfire. Destroyers DUNCAN (DD-485), by naval gunfire. Destroyers FARENHOLT (DD-491), by naval gunfire. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Destroyer FUBUKI, by surface craft, off Savo Island.

10/12 Mon. United State vessel sunk: Destroyer DUNCAN (DD-485) , by naval gunfire, off Savo Island. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Cruiser FURUTAKA, by surface craft, off Savo Island. Destroyer NATSUGUMO, by Naval and Marine aircraft, off Savo Island. Destroyer MURAKUMO, by Naval and Marine aircraft, off Savo Island.

10/13 Tue. 1st Marine Division is reinforced by 164th Infantry Regiment of Americal Division, United States Army this is the first major unit to reach Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands.

10/14 Wed. Motor torpedo boats engage Japanese destroyers screening battleships and cruisers bombarding Henderson Field, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands. United States naval vessel sunk: Destroyer MEREDITH (DD-434) , by aircraft torpedo, off San Cristobal, Solomon Islands.

10/19 Mon. United States naval vessel sunk: Destroyer O'BRIEN (DD-415) , en route to United States for battle repairs, by breaking in two, off Samoa, 13 d. 30' S., 171 d. 18' E.

10/20 Tue. United States naval vessel damaged: Heavy cruiser CHESTER (CA-27), by submarine torpedo, between San Cristobal, Solomon Islands and Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, 13 d. 31 S., 163 d. 17' E.

10/23 The USS OAKLAND CL-95 was LAUNCHED, sponsored by Dr. Aurelia H. Reinhardt, President of Mills College, Oakland, California.

10/26 Mon. Battle of Santa Cruz Islands is joined as carrier task forces (Rear Adm. T. C. Kinkaid and Rear Adm. G. D. Murray) close a numerically superior Japanese force heavy damage is inflicted on United States forces but immediate Japanese movement toward Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, is checked. Battle of Henderson Field, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, ends as Marines repulse Japanese land and air attacks. United States naval vessels damaged: Carrier ENTERPRISE (CV-6), by dive bomber. Carrier HORNET (CV-8), by air attack. Battleship SOUTH DAKOTA (BB-57), by dive bomber. Light cruiser SAN JUAN (CL-54), by dive bomber. Destroyer PORTER (DD-356), by submarine torpedo, and sunk by United States forces. Destroyer SMITH (DD-378), by suicide bomber. Destroyer HUGHES (DD-410), by collision.

10/27 Tue. United States naval vessel sunk: Carrier HORNET (CV-8) , by dive bombers, torpedo bombers, and destroyer torpedoes, 08 d. 38' S., 166 d. 43' E. United States naval vessels damaged: Battleship SOUTH DAKOTA (BB-57) and destroyer MAHAN (DD-364), by collision.

10/30 Fri. Japanese land second invasion force at Attu, Aleutian Islands. (See 16 September 1942.)

11/12 Thu. Naval Battle of Guadalcanal (12-15 November) opens as transports (Rear Adm. R. K. Turner) unloading troops in Lunga Roads, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, under the protection of air and surface forces, are attacked by Japanese aircraft . United States naval vessels damaged: Heavy cruiser SAN FRANCISCO (CA-38), by Japanese aircraft. Destroyer Buchanan (DD-484), accidentally by United States naval gunfire. Japanese submarine sunk: I-22, by PT-122, southwest of New Guinea, 08 d. 32' S., 148 d. 17' E.

11/13 Fri. Landing Support Group (Rear Adm. D. J. Callaghan) encounters Japanese Raiding Group, including two battleships, steaming to bombard Henderson Field, Guadalcanal a devastating naval action ensues in the darkness off Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands. Heavy damage is inflicted on United States force before Japanese Raiding Group retires northward. Carrier force (Rear Adm. T. C. Kinkaid) arrives close to battle area and launches air search and attacks against the enemy (Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, 12-15 November). United States naval vessels sunk: Light cruiser ATLANTA (CL-51), by naval gunfire. Light cruiser JUNEAU (CL-52), by submarine torpedo, as she leaves the Solomon Islands area to proceed to Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, after Battle of Guadalcanal. Destroyer CUSHING (DD-376) , by naval gunfire. Destroyer MONSSEN (DD-436) , by naval gunfire. Destroyer LAFFEY (DD-459) , by gunfire and torpedo from surface craft . United States naval vessels damaged: Heavy cruiser PORTLAND (CA-33) ,by torpedo from surface craft. Light cruiser HELENA (CL-50), by naval gunfire. Destroyer STERETT (DD-407), by naval gunfire. Destroyer O'BANNON (DD-450), accidentally by United State naval gunfire. Destroyer AARON WARD (DD-483), by naval gunfire. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Battleship HIEI, by naval gunfire, carrier-based aircraft, and Marine land-based aircraft. Destroyer AKATSUKI, by naval gunfire. Destroyer YUDACHI, by naval gunfire.

11/14 Sat. Japanese cruisers and destroyers engaged in night bombardment of Henderson Field, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, area attacked by motor torpedo boats. In the morning this enemy force, while retiring, is struck by Marine and Naval aircraft from Henderson Field, and aircraft from carrier ENTERPRISE (CV-6). The same aircraft sink seven Japanese transports during the afternoon. Beginning shortly before midnight and continuing on 15 November, battleship force (Rear Adm. W. W. Lee) composed of 2 battleships and 3 destroyers engages and turns back large Japanese Naval Group (Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, 12-15 November). United States naval vessels sunk: Destroyer PRESTON (DD-379) , by naval gunfire. Destroyer WALKE (DD-416) , by gunfire and torpedo from surface vessel. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Heavy cruiser KINUGASA, by Naval and Marine aircraft.

11/15 Sun. Naval Battle of Guadalcanal ends. [Although the United States suffered greater loss in warships, the Japanese withdrew and never again sent large naval forces into the waters around Guadalcanal the ultimate outcome of the struggle for the island was decided.] United States naval vessel sunk: Destroyer BENHAM (DD-397) , damaged by torpedo and sunk by United States forces . United States naval vessels damaged: Battleship SOUTH DAKOTA (BB-57), by naval gunfire. Destroyer GWIN (DD-433), by naval gunfire . Japanese naval vessels sunk: Battleship KIRISHIMA, by naval gunfire. Destroyer AYANAMI, by naval gunfire.

11/16 Mon. Army forces land south of Buna, New Guinea.

11/24 Tue. Japanese forces land at Munda Point, New Georgia, Solomon Islands.

11/30 Mon. Battle of Tassafaronga, occurs at night when cruiser and destroyer force (Read Adm. C. H. Wright) engages Japanese destroyers (Rear Adm. Tanaka) off Tassafaronga Point, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands enemy torpedoes do heavy damage. United States naval vessels damaged: Heavy cruiser PENSACOLA (CA-24), NORTHAMPTON (CA-26), NEW ORLEANS (CA-32), and MINNEAPOLIS (CA-36), by torpedoes from Japanese destroyers. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Destroyer TAKANAMI, by surface craft.


Contents

Bittern was launched 15 February 1919 by Alabama Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Co., Mobile, Alabama sponsored by Mrs. C. R. Doll and commissioned 28 May 1919, Lieutenant William P. Bachman in command. Bittern ' s first duty was as tender to the captured German submarine SM UB-88 while she made an exhibition tour of the U.S. Gulf Coast and U.S. West Coast ports.

In January 1920 Bittern sailed for the Far East where she remained for the rest of her active service. Throughout most of the next 21 years she wintered at Cavite, Philippine Islands, and summered at Chefoo, China. But the routine was broken occasionally by assignment to scientific expeditions and in September 1923 by relief work following the Yokohama, Japan, earthquake.

Fate [ edit ]

The Japanese air raid on Cavite Navy Yard on 10 December 1941 found Bittern undergoing repairs. Although not hit, Bittern suffered extensive damage from fire, near misses, and flying debris from USS Sealion moored alongside. Too badly damaged for repair, the minesweeper was scuttled in Manila Bay after her crew had transferred to USS Quail.


U.S. Navy Amphibious Ships

40 x Landing Ship, Tank (LST)

USS LST-6 sunk by a mine in the Seine River while en route from Rouen, France, to Portland, England, 18 November 1944.

USS LST-43 sunk by explosion at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 21 May 1944.

USS LST-69 sunk by explosion at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 21 May 1944.

USS LST-158 sunk by aircraft off Licata, Sicily, 11 July 1943.

USS LST-167 stricken after being damaged beyond repair by Japanese aircraft off Vella Lavella, Solomon Islands, 25 September 1943.

USS LST-179 sunk by explosion at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 21 May 1944.

USS LST-203 destroyed by grounding near Nanumea, Ellice Islands, 2 October 1943.

USS LST-228 destroyed by grounding near Bahia Angra Island, Azores, 21 January 1944.

USS LST-282 sunk by a glider bomb off St. Tropez, France, 15 August 1944.

USS LST-313 sunk by German aircraft off Gela, Sicily, 10 July 1943.

USS LST-314 sunk by German motor torpedo boats off Normandy, France, 9 June 1944.

USS LST-318 sunk by aircraft off Caronia, Sicily, 10 August 1943.

USS LST-333 sunk by German submarine U-593 off Dellys, Algeria, 22 June 1943.

USS LST-342 sunk by Japanese submarine RO-106 west of Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, 18 July 1943.

USS LST-348 sunk by German submarine U-410 off Anzio, Italy, 20 February 1944.

USS LST-349 sunk after running aground off Ponza, Italy, 26 February 1944.

USS LST-353 sunk by internal explosion at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 21 May 1944.

USS LST-359 sunk by German submarine U-870 northeast of the Azores, 20 December 1944.

USS LST-376 sunk by German motor torpedo boats off Normandy, France, 9 June 1944.

USS LST-396 sunk by accidental fire and explosion off Vella Lavella, Solomon Islands, 18 August 1943.

USS LST-447 sunk by Kamikaze attack off Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, 7 April 1945.

USS LST-448 sunk by Japanese aircraft off Bougainville, Solomon Islands, 5 October 1943.

USS LST-460 sunk by Kamikaze attack off Mindoro, Philippine Islands, 21 December 1944.

USS LST-472 sunk by Kamikaze attack off Mindoro, Philippine Islands, 15 December 1944.

USS LST-480 sunk by explosion at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 21 May 1944.

USS LST-493 destroyed after grounding while attempting to enter Plymouth Harbor, England, 12 April 1945.

USS LST-496 sunk by a mine off Normandy, France, 11 June 1944.

USS LST-499 sunk by a mine off Normandy, France, 8 June 1944.

USS LST-507 sunk by German motor torpedo boats in Lyme Bay, England, 28 April 1944.

USS LST-523 sunk by a mine off Normandy, France, 19 June 1944.

USS LST-531 sunk by German motor torpedo boats in Lyme Bay, England, 28 April 1944.

USS LST-563 grounded off Clipperton Island, southwest Pacific, 22 December 1944, and abandoned, 9 February 1945.

USS LST-577 sunk by Japanese submarine RO-50 east of Mindanao, Philippine Islands, 11 February 1945.

USS LST-675 grounded off Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, 4 April 1945, and abandoned, 17 September 1945..

USS LST-738 sunk by Kamikaze aircraft off Mindoro, Philippine Islands, 15 December 1944.

USS LST-749 sunk by Kamikaze aircraft off Mindoro, Philippine Islands, 21 December 1944.

USS LST-750 sunk by Japanese aircraft off Los Negros, Leyte, Philippine Islands, 28 December 1944.

USS LST-808 grounded after being damaged by Japanese aircraft off Ie Shima, Ryukyu Islands, 18 May 1945, and destroyed, 11 November 1945.

USS LST- 906 grounded off Leghorn, Italy, 18 October 1944, and scrapped, 22 June 1945..

USS LST-921 torpedoed by German submarine U-764 off the channel entrance to Bristol, England, 14 August 1944, and struck from the Navy list, 14 October 1944.

6 x Landing Ship, Medium (LSM)

USS LSM-12 foundered after being damaged by a Japanese suicide boat off Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, 4 April 1945.

USS LSM-20 sunk by Kamikaze attack off Ormoc, Leyte, Philippine Islands, 5 December 1944.

USS LSM-59 sunk by Kamikaze attack off Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, 21 June 1945.

USS LSM-135 sunk by Kamikaze attack off Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, 25 May 1945.

USS LSM-149 grounded off the Philippine Islands, 5 December 1944.

USS LSM-318 sunk by Kamikaze attack off Ormoc, Leyte, Philippine Islands, 7 December 1944.

3 x Landing Ship, Medium (Rocket) (LSMR)

USS LSMR-190 sunk by Kamikaze attack off Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, 4 May 1945.

USS LSMR-194 sunk by Kamikaze attack off Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, 4 May 1945.

USS LSMR-195 sunk by Kamikaze attack off Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, 3 May 1945.

71 x Landing Craft, Tank (LCT)

LCT(5)-19 sunk off Salerno, Italy, 15 September 1943.

LCT(5)-21 sunk off Oran, Algeria, 1 January 1943.

LCT(5)-23 sunk at Algiers, Algeria, 3 May 1943.

LCT(5)-25 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

LCT(5)-26 sunk, 25 February 1944, and stricken from the Navy List, 6 March 1944.

LCT(5)-27 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

LCT(5)-28 sunk in the Mediterranean Sea, 30 May 1943.

LCT(5)-30 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

LCT(5)-35 sunk off Anzio, Italy, 15 February 1944.

LCT(5)-36 sunk off Naples, Italy, 26 February 1944.

LCT(5)-66 sunk at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 12 April 1945.

LCT(5)-71 sunk, 11 September 1943.

LCT(5)-147 sunk off northern France, June 1944.

LCT(5)-154 sunk, 31 August 1943.

LCT(5)-175 sunk, 21 February 1945.

LCT(5)-182 sunk off the Solomon Islands, 7 August 1944.

LCT(5)-185 sunk off Bizerte, Tunisia, 24 January 1944.

LCT(5)-196 sunk off Salerno, Italy, 27 September 1943.

LCT(5)-197 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

LCT(5)-200 sunk off northern France, June 1944.

LCT(5)-208 sunk off Algeria, 20 June 1943.

LCT(5)-209 sunk off northern France, 10 June 1944.

LCT(5)-215 sunk off Salerno, Italy, 1943.

LCT(5)-220 sunk at Anzio, Italy, 13 February 1944.

LCT(5)-241 sunk off Salerno, Italy, 15 September 1943.

LCT(5)-242 sunk off Naples, Italy, 2 December 1943.

LCT(5)-244 sunk off northern France, 8 June 1944.

LCT(5)-253 sunk on passage to Tarawa, 21 January 1945.

LCT(5)-293 sunk in English Channel, 11 October 1944.

LCT(5)-294 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

LCT(5)-305 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

LCT(5)-311 sunk off Bizerte, Tunisia, 9 August 1943.

LCT(5)-315 sunk at Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands, 23 March 1944.

LCT(5)-319 sunk at Kiska, Aleutian Islands, 27 August 1943.

LCT(5)-332 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

LCT(5)-340 sunk, 9 February 1944 and stricken from the Navy List, 6 March 1944.

LCT(5)-342 sunk off Salerno, Italy, 29 September 1943.

LCT(5)-352 sunk at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 12 April 1945.

LCT(5)-362 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

LCT(5)-364 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

LCT(5)-366 sunk, 9 September 1943.

LCT(5)-413 sunk off northern France, June 1944.

LCT(5)-458 sunk off northern France, 7 June 1944.

LCT(5)-459 sunk off western France, 19 September 1944.

LCT(5)-486 sunk off northern France, 7 June 1944.

LCT(5)-496 sunk in the English Channel, 2 October 1943.

LCT(6)-548 sunk at Portsmouth, England, October 1944.

LCT(6)-555 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

LCT(6)-572 sunk off northern France, June 1944.

LCT(6)-579 sunk off Palau, Caroline Islands, 4 October 1944.

LCT(6)-582 sunk in the Azores Islands, 22 January 1944.

LCT(6)-593 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

LCT(6)-597 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

LCT(6)-612 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

LCT(6)-703 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

LCT(6)-713 sunk off northern France, June 1944.

LCT(6)-714 sunk off northern France, June 1944.

LCT(6)-777 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

LCT(6)-823 sunk off Palau, Caroline Islands, 27 September 1944.

LCT(6)-961 sunk at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 21 May 1944.

LCT(6)-963 sunk at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 21 May 1944.

LCT(6)-983 sunk at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 21 May 1944.

LCT(6)-984 sunk, 15 May 1944, and stricken from the Navy List, 9 June 1944.

LCT(6)-988 sunk, 15 May 1944, ans stricken from the Navy List, 9 June 1944.

LCT(6)-995 sunk at Guam, Mariana Islands, 21 April 1945.

LCT(6)-1029 sunk at Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 2 March 1945.

LCT(6)-1050 sunk off Ie Shima, Ryukyu Islands, 27 July 1945.

LCT(6)-1075 sunk off Leyte, Philippine Islands, 10 December 1944.

LCT(6)-1090 sunk off Luzon, Philippine Islands, 26 March 1945.

LCT(6)-1151 sunk, 26 January 1945.

LCT(6)-1358 sunk off California, 4 May 1945.

5 x Landing Craft, Infantry (Gunboat) (LCI(G))

USS LCI(G)-82 sunk by Japanese suicide boat off Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, 4 April 1945.

USS LCI(G)-365 sunk by Japanese suicide boat in Lingayen Gulf, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 10 January 1945.

USS LCI(G)-459 sunk off Palau, Caroline Islands, 19 September 1944.

USS LCI(G)-468 sunk, 17 June 1944.

USS LCI(G)-474 sunk off Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 17 February 1945.

16 x Landing Craft, Infantry (Large) (LCI(L))

USS LCI(L)-1 sunk off Bizerte, Tunisia, 17 August 1943.

USS LCI(L)-20 sunk off Anzio, Italy, 22 January 1944.

USS LCI(L)-32 sunk off Anzio, Italy, 26 January 1944.

USS LCI(L)-85 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

USS LCI(L)-91 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

USS LCI(L)-92 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

USS LCI(L)-93 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

USS LCI(L)-219 sunk off northern France, 11 June 1944.

USS LCI(L)-232 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

USS LCI(L)-339 sunk off New Guinea, 4 September 1943.

USS LCI(L)-416 sunk off northern France, 9 June 1944.

USS LCI(L)-497 sunk off northern France, 6 June 1944.

USS LCI(L)-553 sunk off Northern France, 6 June 1944.

USS LCI(L)-600 sunk by undetermined explosion at Ulithi, Caroline Islands, 12 January 1945.

USS LCI(L)-684 sunk off Samar, Philippine Islands, 12 November 1945.

USS LCI(L)-1065 sunk off Leyte, Philippine Islands, 24 October 1944.

1 x Landing Craft, Infantry (Mortar) (LCI(M))

USS LCI(M)-974 sunk by Japanese suicide boat in Lingayen Gulf, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 10 January 1945.

7 x Landing Craft, Support (Large)(Mk. III) (LCS(L))

USS LCS(L)(3)-7 sunk by Suicide boat off Mariveles, Corregidor Channel, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 16 February 1945.

USS LCS(L)(3)-15 sunk by Kamikaze aircraft off Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, 22 April 1945.

USS LCS(L)(3)-26 sunk by Suicide boat off Mariveles, Corregidor Channel, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 16 February 1945.

USS LCS(L)(3)-33 sunk by shore batteries off Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 19 February 1945.

USS LCS(L)(3)-37 engines damaged beyond repair by a depth charge dropped under the fantail by a suicide boat off Nakagusuki Wan, Okinawa, 28 April 1945.

USS LCS(L)(3)-49 sunk by Suicide boat off Mariveles, Corregidor Channel, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 16 February 1945.

USS LCS(L)(3)-127 sunk off California, 5 March 1945, and stricken from the Navy List, 30 March 1945.


HMS Bittern (1897)

HMS Bittern (1897) was a C class destroyer that served in home waters for her entire career. She was part of the Devonport Local Defence Flotilla in 1914-1918, and was lost with her entire crew after she collided with SS Kenilworth in thick fog on 4 April 1918.

The Vickers 30-knotters had four Thornycroft boilers in two stokeholds, with the second and third boilers sharing a single funnel. They followed the standard general layout, with a turtleback foredeck, with a conning tower with gun platform and bridge above just behind the turtledeck. Two 6-pounder guns were on either side of the conning tower, two on the sides of the ship and one on the stern. On the three ships of the 1985-6 programme one torpedo tube was between the first and second funnel and the second behind the rear funnel. They were built with the chart table on the front of the bridge/ gun platform.

Pre-war Career

The Bittern was laid down on 18 February 1896 and launched on 1 February 1987.

On 21 October 1898 a navigating party was sent from Chatham to bring the Bittern from Vickers at Barrow.

Her official trials were ordered to begin off Sheerness on 16 November 1898. Trials in the North Sea were ordered to begin on 24 November, and her engines were expected to indicate 6,000hp.

On 6 January 1899 her steering gear began erratic while she was in the middle of a measured mile trial, and she narrowly avoiding running onto the Maplin Sands after her engines were thrown into reverse. She briefly hit the sands, sprang a leak and had to return to Chatham.

She carried out the same trial two weeks later, reaching just over 30 knots at 6,659hp.

In 1899 the Bittern took part in speed and fuel efficiency trials. She reached 30.354 knots at 6,366ihp, consuming 2.40 pounds of coal per iHP per hour and 30.403 knots at 6,627ihp

Brassey&rsquos Naval Annual of 1900 listed those results, and a faster speed of 30.408 knots at 6,627ihp.

On Wednesday 13 December 1899 she completed her steam trials, and was placed on the effective list as ready for commission.

In 1900-1904 the Bittern was part of the Nore Flotilla, one of the three that contained all of the home based destroyers.

The Bittern took part in the 1900 naval manoeuvres, when she formed part of the Chatham division of Fleet B, the defensive fleet. Fleet A was smaller, but was expecting reinforcements from the Mediterranean, suggesting that the potential enemy at this stage was France.

The Bittern took part in the 1901 naval manoeuvres, which began in late July. These involved two fleets &ndash Fleet B began in the North Sea, and had the task of keeping the English Channel open to trade. Fleet X began off the north coast of Ireland, and had the task of stopping trade in the Channel. The Bittern was part of a force of destroyers from Chatham that joined Fleet X. This was the first time both sides in the annual exercises had been given an equal force of destroyers. The exercises ended with a victory for Fleet X. The destroyer forces didn&rsquot live up to expectations, either in torpedo attack or as scouts.

In November 1901 it was announced that her boilers were to be re-tubed, after some time operating with the Medway Destroyer Instructional Flotilla.

In 1904 the Bittern moved to the Devonport Flotilla.

In February 1904 her commanding officer, Lt Harrold, was sued by Mr James Piper, owner of the barge Rosebank. He claimed that Harrold had travelled up the Medway at excessive speed, causing his barge to hit the barge Eastern. However the Navy claimed that the Bittern had only being going at 8 knots, and Harrold was acquitted.

In mid-April 1904 she was released from the Sheerneess Dockyards, and judged to be fit to escort the King and Queen during their return voyage across the Irish Sea. This was a short duty, and on 2 May 1904 she was paid off at Chatham, she entered the Medway Reserve and her crew moved to the new destroyer Usk.

In the summer of 1904 she took part in the annual naval manoeuvres. On the morning of Monday 25 July she left Kingstown to join the destroyer flotilla, but instead had to come to the aid of the Codling Lightship, which had developed a problem with its engines.

On 3 January 1905 her crew was to be brought up to its full complement, so she could replace the Leven in the Devonport Instructional Flotilla.

In late March 1905 she was commissioned under the command of Lt. J. Kiddle, with the crew from the Sunfish, and replaced her in the Medway Flotilla.

In 1905 she was part of the 3rd Division, one of three destroyer divisions attached to the Channel Fleet

In 1909-1913 she was part of the 5th Destroyer Flotilla, part of the 3rd Division of the Home Fleet, which contained the older battleships.

In July 1914 she was in active commission at Devonport, with the 7th Destroyer Flotilla, one of the patrol flotillas.

First World War

Her commander at the outbreak of the First World War was Gordon Campbell. He was later awarded the Victoria Cross for sinking the German submarine U-83 on 17 February 1917, while in command of the Q Ship HMS Farnborough. At the time the reason for the award was kept secret, causing some interest in the press!

In August 1914 she wasn&rsquot listed in the Pink List, the Admiralty list of warship location. At that point no destroyers were listed as part of the Devonport Local Defence Flotilla, so this may just reflect a gap in the lists.

In November 1914 she was one of four destroyers in the Devonport Local Defence Flotilla.

In June 1915 she was one of six destroyers in the Devonport Local Defence Flotilla.

In January 1916 she was one of four destroyers in the Devonport Local Defence Flotilla, but she was undergoing repairs that were expected to end on 15 January and was in the hands of a care and maintenance party.

In October 1916 she was one of six destroyers in the Devonport Local Defence Flotilla

In January 1917 she was one of six destroyers in the Devonport Local Defence Flotilla

On 11 February 1917 she was patrolling close to Plymouth when she sighted a mine, which she sank with rifle fire. This meant that the port was closed from 3.30pm while the approaches were checked, The Bittern and Sunfish were ordered to patrol off the Eddystone and divert any approaching shipping. However the message didn&rsquot reach the troop ship SS Afric, which was sunk by a German submarine early on 12 February.

On 25 April 1917 UB-32 torpedoed the troop ship SS Ballarat, carrying 1,760 troops from Melbourne to Plymouth. All of the troops onboard were rescued, and the Bittern was ordered to escort two tugs to her position to try and save the ship. In the dark they went past her, and didn&rsquot find her until 1.25am. They were then ordered to wait until dawn before attempting to take her in tow, but she sank at 4.30am on 26 April.

In June 1917 she was one of four active destroyers in the Devonport Local Defence Flotilla

In January 1918 she was one of four destroyers in the Devonport Local Defence Flotilla, but she was undergoing repairs.

The Bittern sank after she collided with SS Kenilworth in thick fog off Portland Bill on 4 April 1918. Seventy five men were lost and there were no survivors.

Commanding Officer
-January 1899-: Lt Blunt
-February 1904-: Lt Harrold
-July 1904-: Lt Hammond
March 1905-: Lt J. Kiddle
-August 1914-: Gordon Campbell


Forces At Other Locations In The Philippine Islands

Heavy Cruiser
CA-30 Houston, Iloilo PI

Light Cruiser
CL-47 Boise, Cebu, PI
Note Boise Belonged to the Pacific Fleet,
She had recently escorted a reinforcement convoy to the Philippines and was "Drafted" into the Asiatic Fleet.

Submarines
SS-141, S-36, on patrol off Lingayen, PI
SS-144, S-39, on patrol off Sarosogon Bay, Luzon PI

Seaplane Tenders
AVD-7 William B. Preston, Davao, PI
AVP-2 Huron, Palawan, PI


Company History

The EJ legacy dates back to 1883 when William E. Malpass and his father-in-law Richard W. Round established a foundry on the shores of Lake Charlevoix, in the town of East Jordan, Michigan, USA. This foundry was called Round and Malpass Foundry and originally produced cast parts for the lumber industry, machinery, ships, agricultural equipment, and railroads. In 1886, William&rsquos brother, James, joined the business and the company was renamed East Jordan Iron Works.

In the 1920s, when the lumbering era came to a close, the company welcomed the second generation to the business and expanded into new markets allowing continued success in changing times. Production shifted to street castings, water works valves, fire hydrants, and various industrial castings. Through World War II, the foundry produced castings for the war effort. In the 1950s, semi-automation was introduced into the foundry.

During the 1960s, the third generation automated the foundry with the addition of a high-pressure molding line. By integrating automatic sand processing and mechanized casting handling systems, the company was operating the largest automated molding line in the United States and maximized production capabilities.

Since the late 1980s, the business has been led by the fourth generation descendants of the Malpass family. They have transformed the Midwest business into an international leader of providing access solutions to infrastructure systems.

Beginning in the 1990s, acquisitions throughout the United States allowed the company to expand product lines, sales offices, distribution capabilities, and customer services across North America. In 2001, a new foundry was built in Oklahoma providing additional capacity to service growing markets in the United States, as well as Central and South America. The fifth generation of the Malpass family began joining the company in the late 1990s, continuing the strong family commitment to the company&rsquos success.

In the early 2000s, East Jordan Iron Works began turning its attention to expansion in other parts of the world, with the acquisition of Cavanagh Foundry in Ireland (2000), Norinco in France (2004), McCoy Construction Castings in Canada (2006), and HaveStock in Australia (2010).

In 2012, East Jordan Iron Works and its affiliated companies began doing business using the same name and brand, EJ. One global name and brand, supported by a single mission, vision, and set of values has unified the company. This action leverages all company resources to improve internal operations, as well as provide superior product offerings and services to its valued customers.

Increasing its global footprint, EJ continues to grow through acquisition and reinvestment with the addition of Bernard Cassart & Cie in Belgium (2012), Syracuse Castings Sales Corporation and Syracuse Castings West Corporation in the USA (2012), Etheridge Foundry & Machine Company in the USA (2012), E.A. Quirin Machine in the USA (2013), GMI Composites in the USA (2014), the municipal casting distribution of Mueller Canada Ltd., in Canada (2014), GAV GmbH in Germany (2015), Peter Savage Ltd. and Integrated Ducting Systems in the United Kingdom (2015), Schacht und Bautechnik Vertriebs GmbH (SBV) in Austria (2016), as well as the expansion of composite manufacturing in Birr, Ireland in (2018), the construction of a state-of-the-art manufacturing facility in Northern Michigan, USA (2018) and the construction of a new fabrication facility in New York, USA (2019).

Today, the company provides a full line of access solutions for the infrastructure systems of municipalities, utility companies, airport and port authorities, and private companies. Products include manhole covers and frames, catch basin and curb inlet grates and frames, trench grates, and tree grates. In addition to traditional materials of gray or ductile cast iron, a continuously expanding array of innovative solutions are offered in composites, fabricated steel, and fabricated aluminum. EJ also provides products for water supply systems including fire hydrants and valves, valve and service boxes, and various other water supply products. EJ supplies products to infrastructure projects in 6 of the 7 continents.

EJ continues to be 100% owned by descendants of William E. Malpass, and members of the family continue to be active in managing the business. The fourth and fifth generation remain dedicated to maintaining the company&rsquos long-established culture and values, setting strategies and priorities. This has allowed EJ to remain one of the most stable, progressive, and well-tooled manufacturing companies in the world. The corporate headquarters continues to remain in East Jordan, Michigan, USA.


Bittern AM-36 - History

AUGUSTA (CA-31) FF
Capt. John H. Magruder, Jr.
MARBLEHEAD (CL-12)
Cmdr. Thomas Moran

ASHEVILLE (PG-21)
Cmdr. Hobart A. Sailor
ISABEL (PY-10)
Lt. Cmdr. Henry W. Goodall
TULSA (PG-22)
Cmdr. Roswell H. Blair

DESTROYER DIVISION THIRTEEN
Commander Myron W. Hutchinson, Jr.

WHIPPLE (DD-217) (F)
Lt. Cmdr. Rupert M. Zimmerli
ALDEN (DD-211)
Lt. Cmdr. Stanley F. Patten
BARKER (DD-213)
Lt. Cmdr. Justin S. Fitzgerald
JOHN D. EDWARDS (DD-216)
Lt. Cmdr. William G. Fisher

SUBMARINE DIVISION FOURTEEN
Commander John Wilkes

PICKEREL (SS-177) (F)
Lt. Barton E. Bacon, Jr.
PERMIT (SS-178)
Lt. Cmdr. Adrian M. Hurst
PERCH (SS-176)
Lt. David A. Hurt
PIKE (SS-173)
Lt. William A. New
PORPOISE (SS-172)
Lt. Cmdr. Joseph A. Callaghan
TARPON (SS-175)
Lt. Cmdr. William W. Weeden, Jr.

SUBMARINE DIVISION TEN
Commander Paul R. Gluting

S-37 (SS-142) (F)
Lt. Thomas L. Greene
S-36 (SS-141)
Lt. Rob R. McGregor
S-38 (SS-143)
Lt. Roland F. Pryce
S-39 (SS-144)
Lt. Earle C. Hawk
S-40 (SS-145)
Lt. Richard C. Lake
S-41 (SS-146)
Lt. Charles O. Triebel

LANGLEY (AV-3)**
Commander Arthur C. Davis**

VP-21**
Commander Sam L. LaHache**

HERON (AVP-2)
Lt. Charles R. Carroll

Utility Unit - 3 VJ
Lt. (jg) F. W. Sheppard

DESTROYER DIVISION FOURTEEN
Commander Walter C. Ansel

STEWART (DD-224) (F)
Lt. Cmdr. Donald S. Evans
BULMER (DD-222)
Lt. Cmdr. James J. McGlynn
EDSALL (DD-219)
Lt. Cmdr. Abel C. J. Sabalot
PARROTT (DD-218)
Lt. Cmdr. Wilkie H. Brereton

DESTROYER DIVISION FIFTEEN
Commander Francis A. Smith

PEARY (DD-226) (F)
Lt. Cmdr. William G. Lalor
JOHN D. FORD (DD-228)
Lt. Cmdr. John D. Shaw
PILLSBURY (DD-227)
Lt. Cmdr. Arthur A. Ageton
POPE (DD-225)
Lt. Cmdr. Clarence L. C. Atkeson, Jr.

MINE DIVISION THREE
Lieutenant Tillett S. Daniel

BITTERN (AM-36) (F)
Lt. Tillett S. Daniel
FINCH (AM-9)
Lt. Benjamin May, 2nd


USS Lapwing (AM-1)

Authored By: JR Potts, AUS 173d AB | Last Edited: 07/18/2016 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.

Leading up to 1917, the United States Navy had used sloops and tugs to locate and destroy enemy mines in harbors and on the seas. As American ships ventured ever closer to foreign shores, a special ship was needed to locate and remove such mines from the all-important sea lanes. The USS Lapwing (AM-1) was the lead ship of her class of a minesweepers becoming, the first minesweeper in United States Navy history. The class was named for birds, the lapwing a plover that was slow and in flight and seemed to display an uneven wing-flapping action. The navy built 49 of these ships to be used worldwide in much the same vein as her namesake bird ranging in abundance throughout Europe, Asia and Northern Africa. Lapwing was laid down in October of 1917 at the Todd Shipyard Company in New York and commissioned on June 12th, 1918 with Lieutenant (Junior Grade) William Fremgen in command. The Navy felt these ships could double in the training role and thusly stationed junior grade officers in command of them.

USS Lapwing, Minesweeper No.1, put to sea for normal sea trials with her new crew. The trials were not only needed to check the ships handling but to devise new minesweeping maneuvers for the Navy. Following several convoy escort cruises to Halifax, Lapwing departed New London, Connecticut on September 26th of 1918 for Europe. Assigned to the North Sea mine barrage, the USS Lapwing removed some 2,160 wartime mines from British waters between June and September of 1919.

During World War 1, the British and Germans mined such sea lanes in the North Sea and throughout the English Channel. There have always been three major uses for mine: offensive, defensive and psychological. Offensive mines were dropped in enemy waters, just outside the valuable harbors and in shipping routes with the intention of sinking unsuspecting ships. Defensive minefields could be congregated at strategic locations and use to protect a coast from enemy ships and submarines. Minefields also carried with them the inherent psychological effect and could be equally set along enemy shipping lanes. Just a few a mines along a major shipping route could delay enemy supply convoys for hours or days until the entire area was swept and cleared by mine sweepers.

Minesweepers of this time were only equipped with mechanical sweep devices used to detonate "contact" mines. The earliest mines were usually the contact type - a low cost alternative to any other anti-ship weapon of the day. Contact mines needed to be very close to a metal target before they could trigger detonation, limiting their damage to the immediate vicinity and usually affecting only the single vessel that had triggered the detonation. The first mine detonators that were used contained a vial filled with sulfuric acid surrounded by a mixture of potassium perchlorate and sugar. When the vial was crushed, the acid ignited a flame that - in turn - ignited the onboard gunpowder causing a spectacular localized detonation. Early in the 1870s, the Hertz Horn Mine was invented. These mines could remain active in the sea for several years after being laid down. The mine's upper half was studded with hollow lead spikes, each about 10 inches long and containing a glass vial filled with sulfuric acid. When the mine bumped against a ship's hull it would crush the metal spiked "horn" and crack the vial inside of it, releasing the acid. The acid would drain down through a tube to a lead acid battery to which the battery would then become energized and cause a quick electrical spark, leading to detonation and explosion. Many early mines were extremely fragile and unstable, making them quite dangerous to handle. Their glass containers were filled with nitro or mechanical devices that activated them when tilted. At any rate, it was a dangerous business and many mine laying ships were destroyed when their own cargo of live mines exploded.

A submarine could run at any depth down to the seabed and, as a result, the "antenna mine" was invented to combat them. This particular mine had a copper wire attached to a buoy that floated above the mine. The top and bottom part of the cable connecting the mine to the weight on the seabed that was also made of copper. If a submarine's steel hull touched the copper wire, the slight voltage produced from the contact between two different metals produced a charge that detonated the mine.

Mechanical sweeps became devices designed to cut the anchoring cables of moored mines and tow them behind the minesweeper. They utilized a towed body called oropesa floats, connected to a kite otter that was needed to maintain the sweep at the desired depth and position. A contact sweep used a wire that was dragged through the water by one or two ships to cut the mooring wire of floating mines or provided a distance sweep that mimicked a ship to purposely detonate such mines. Each run could cover between one and two hundred meters and the ships were required to move deliberately and slowly in a straight line. If a contact sweep hit a mine, the wire of the sweep rubbed against the mooring wire until it was fully cut. Sometimes the minesweeper towed explosive devices to cut the mine's wire and were used to lessen the strain on the sweeping wire. Mines that were cut free were then generally exploded with a blast from a 3-inch deck gun.

After World War 1, Lapwing returned to the United States and, after normal repairs and some re-crewing, she was dispatched to the West Coast, arriving in San Diego in October of 1920. USS Lapwing received orders to sail for Pearl Harbor in January of 1921. USS Lapwing was assigned to the Pacific Fleet stationed at Pearl Harbor and performed minesweeping operations in Hawaiian waters until she was decommissioned on April 11th, 1922 at Pearl.

The U.S. Navy now planned for "Small Seaplane Tenders" (AVPs), vessels requiring shallow drafts and capable of supporting one flight squadron. These vessels were cheaper to build or convert from other classes and were able to operate in shallow waters. These ships also had hangars for storing and maintaining aircraft without the need for a flight deck. Cranes were added to Lapwing to lower aircraft into the sea for take-off and to recover them after landing. The seaplane could only be operated in a smooth sea and the ship had to stop for launching or recovery of aircraft, and both actions could take around 20 minutes each. The tender was often stationed ten miles or so in front of the main battle fleet along with the cruiser screen for protection when it launched its aircraft. On September 1st, 1932, USS Lapwing was officially converted to a Small Seaplane Tender.

USS Lapwing, with Lieutenant R. J. Arnold in command, now had a new mission to serve and protect her seaplane aircraft. The ship's dimensions changed to support the new mission. The added weight of the aircraft crane and supporting aircraft supplies (along with 80,000 gallons of aviation fuel) increased her draught to 13 feet, 1 inch and the crew increased by the addition of seven airmen. Her new station was Coco Solo, Canal Zone and she arrived for duty in October of 1932.

From 1933 to 1941, Lapwing participated in various exercises with her aircraft, helping develop American naval aviation capability and formulate the seaplane tender role for future conflicts. USS Lapwing's participation in developing the tender's mission was important enough that she was reclassified as a Small Seaplane Tender on January 22nd, 1936. USS Lapwing (AVP-1) operated primarily with seaplanes in the Panama Canal Zone, along the West Coast, and in the Caribbean Sea, the latter basing her at Trinidad in the British West Indies.

Her World War 2 service saw Lapwing assigned to the North Atlantic with Patrol Wing 3. She departed the Caribbean in February of 1942 and arrived in Narsarssuak, Greenland in May of 1942. Lapwing remained in the North Atlantic, engaging in patrol and Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) missions with her seaplanes until 1943.

She was assigned another tour in the Caribbean and arrived in Key West in June of 1943 for duty as a training ship. Operating out of the Fleet Sound School for 11 months, Lapwing's mission was to continue to develop tactics for air ASW technology. Lapwing's task force cruised to Recife, Brazil in August of 1944 looking for enemy submarines. The task force and the seaplane tender returned to Key West in early September and performed various training missions for the rest of the war. Lapwing steamed to Charleston, South Carolina on October 5th, 1945. Once there, she was officially decommissioned and struck from the naval roster on November 29th, 1945. She was sold on August 19th, 1946 to W. S. Sanders, Norfolk, Virginia by the War Shipping Administration (WSA), a World War 2 emergency war agency of the US government tasked to purchase and operate civilian shipping tonnage that was so desperately needed for the US war effort. Her ultimate fate beyond that was unknown.

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