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Personnel of No.7 Squadron RAF, 1945

Personnel of No.7 Squadron RAF, 1945

Personnel of No.7 Squadron RAF, 1945

This picture shows the entire compliment of No.7 Squadron in 1945, standing in front of one of the squadron's Avro Lancaster bombers.

Many thanks to Jackie Phillips for providing us with this picture.


Personnel

These lists have been compiled from poor quality and incomplete source documents. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure accuracy, it should be recognised that the list may be subject to errors and omissions.

Furthermore, the source documents, whilst recording many of the postings of officers, contain little information regarding Others Ranks on strength of the squadron

World War One (WWI) Era

Inter-War Era

World War Two (WWII) Era

Post-War Era


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Personnel of No.121 (Eagle) Squadron look on as three Spitfire Vbs come in to land at RAF Rochford in Essex, after a fighter sweep over northern France during August 1942.

No.121 Squadron was the second 'Eagle' squadron, manned by American volunteers. It was formed at Kirton-in-Lindsey, and was initially equipped with Hurricanes. Defensive patrols began in October 1941, and the Spitfire arrived in the following month. In December the squadron moved to North Weald, and in February 1942 began to fly offensive fighter sweeps over Northern France.

In August 1942 the squadron was one of 48 Spitfire squadrons to be involved in 'Operation Jubilee', the raid on Dieppe.

On 29 September 1942 No.121 Squadron became the 335th Fighter Squadron, 4th Fighter Group.
(historyofwar.org)

(Photo source - © IWM (D 9509)

Britain At War Magazine - The UK’s best selling military history title

Colourised RAF Fighter & Bomber Command 1939-1945

De Havilland Mosquito Mk II of No. 157 Squadron RAF refuelling at Hunsdon, Hertfordshire. 16 June 1943

No. 157 Squadron was the first squadron to use the Mosquito as a night fighter, reforming on 13 December 1941 specifically to operate the type (after a short incarnation towards the end of the First World War).

The first patrols were flown on the night of 27-28 April 1942 over East Anglia but the first confirmed kill did not come until 22/23 August 1942.

As the threat from German bombers faded, No. 157 squadron received a number of Mosquito FB.Mk VIs, and began to fly intruder missions over occupied Europe. In November 1943 the squadron moved to Cornwall and increasingly concentrated on the intruder role. After a brief interlude flying defensive patrols over the Irish Sea, in May 1944 the squadron moved to East Anglia, where it joined No.100 Group and carried out intruder missions to support the heavy bombers.

(Source - IWM Non Commercial Licence - CH 10312
P/O H V Drees, Royal Air Force official photographer)


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Sgt Waddicar and medals

FS James Ian Cunningham Waddicar DFM, 953982, Mid Upper Gunner

3196 SUPPLEMENT TO THE LONDON GAZETTE, 21 JULY 1942
Award of the Distinguished Flying Medal

"The first fighter then returned to the attack but was met with a long and vicious burst from Sergeant Waddicar's guns which sent the enemy aircraft spinning towards the ground, where it exploded on impact. Sergeant Waddicar, with commendable ingenuity, had temporarily repaired one of his guns which had failed and opened fire at the second aircraft from close range. The attacker dived away and exploded before hitting the water. Throughout the operation, these airmen displayed unflinching courage, great fortitude and splendid team work in foiling the attacks of 5 enemy fighters, 3 of which were shot down. Their conduct upheld the highest traditions of the Royal Air Force."

Source : 214 Squadron ORB and London Gazette and National Archives Air Records AIR/50/233/13

Date record last updated : 8 January 2021


Sgt Alan Cartwright Wade, 943745, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, KIA 11 April 1943, Aged 25

Named on the following Memorial : RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL Panel 168.

Son of Herbert and Alice Wade, of Leeds, Yorkshire.

Source : Cheryl Garner, Great Niece of Thomas Frank Richardson and CWGC.

Date record last updated : 30 January 2011


Flt/Lt J H Waite, 87654, Observer / Bomb Aimer

Peter Waite writes :
My father flew in 214 Squadron as an "Observer" Navigator and Bomb Aimer, from January 1941 until June 1942 mainly in T2709 D with Sq/Ldr Sharp as pilot and captain but later in R1613G and N2802 A with P/O Crampton.

My father trained at No 20 OTU and after leaving 214 trained as an instructor at No2 SOAN before being seconded to the RAAF until 1944 when he returned to the UK.

Source : Peter Waite (son of Flt/Lt J H Waite)

Date record last updated : 8 March 2019

Was a regular crew member with Gp/Capt John Aidan Field

Source : Richard Field (son of Gp/Capt John Aidan Field)

Date record last updated : 24 May 2019


Plt/Off S Walch, J45149, Royal Canadian Air Force

Source : 214 Squadron ORB

Date record last updated : 17 April 2020


FS Frank J Waldron, Flight Engineer, Royal Air Force

Joined the crew in October 1944 and was replaced in January 1945 by George Cox

Source : John McCall (son of Keith McCall) and Sqn/Ldr John McLelland (Rtd) (Son of Fg/Off McLelland) and 214 Squadron ORB

Date record last updated : 17 April 2020


Plt/Off Charles Norman Walker, 78863, Pilot, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 8 January 1941, Aged 29

Buried in SALE CEMETERY. Reference : Sec. S. Grave 6086.

Son of Robert William and Ethel Walker, of Sale husband of Marjorie Evelyn Walker. of Sale.

Was on strengh of 38 Squadron, a unit that had moved recently to the Middle East.

Source : CWGC and Chorley

Date record last updated : 15 June 2018


Fg/Off Edward 'Ted' Walker, Navigator

Ted died, age 96, on November 30th 2007.

He was a navigator on 214 Squadron until mid 1943 when a number of aircraft and crews were transferred to the newly formed 620 Squadron at Chedburgh.
While with 620 Squadron on August 23/24th 1943, on a raid to Berlin, Ted's Stirling BK801 was shot down over Germany n a mission to Berlin. He was taken to Sagan (Zagan) & Belaria, Germany L3 POW camp. His POP number was 2290. Of the eight crew only Ted and two others survived to be taken POWs.

Ted had attended many 214 Squadron Reunions and, although frail, he insisted that he attend that held in September 2007. His son Jim who brought him from Darlington says that Ted thoroughly enjoyed himself although he got rather tired towards the end of the evening.

Source : Nightjar Newsletter Winter/Spring 2008, Peter Walker and "Footprints on the sands of time" by Oliver Clutton-Brock

Date record last updated : 20 November 2020


FS J W 'Johnny' Walker, R.173927, Rear Gunner, Royal Canadian Air Force, Nationality : Canadian

Was the only person injured on 21 June 1944. All of the crew survived.

Source : Nightjar Newsletter Spring 2003 and Return of operational Aircrew at 16:00hrs on 31 August 1944

Date record last updated : 22 June 2014


Sqn/Ldr Nigel Firth Walker DFC DSO, Navigator, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom

Nigel Walker joined 214 Squadron in November 1940 as a sergeant navigator. His captain was Pilot Officer Jack Wetherly.
When Jack Wetherly completed his tour in March 1941 the crew was taken over by Pilot Officer John Topliss. When Topliss and his crew were lost on Hamburg on 11 May 1941 flying Wellington R1462, Walker was not with them: he was on leave prior to being commissioned.

In 1942 he returned to operations, joining 83 Squadron (Pathfinders). Here he completed a second tour, serving as Navigation Officer and Bombing Leader, and was awarded the DFC (1942) and the DSO (1943).

He survived the war, married a WAAF from the Y Service and lived in Oxford. In 1963 he published his recollections of his time in Bomber Command, entitled Strike to Defend.

Source : Christopher Jary, Author - Portrait Of A Bomber Pilot.

Date record last updated : 16 May 2009


Flt/Lt Peter Fowler Walker, 85280, Navigator, Royal Air Force, Date taken POW 9 December 1940, POW number 34

Imprisoned at POW camp Dulag Luft (Oberursel), Germany
Imprisoned at POW camp Marlag-Milag Nord, Tarmstedt, Germany
Imprisoned at POW camp Sagan (Zagan) & Belaria, Germany

Flt/Lt Peter Walker is recorded as baling out from his aircraft when it hit a barrage balloon cable on 9 December 1940 while flying between R.A.F Stradishall and 70 Squadron based in the Middle East.

Flt/Lt Peter Walker was captured near St Marie, northern France on 9 December 1940.

Flt/Lt Walker is not listed in "Footprints on the sands of time" by Oliver Clutton-Brock, which has an extensive list of POW's.

Listed in the London Gazette as follows:

LG No 34970 on 15 October 1940 - Promotion to Pilot Officer on probation as of 8 September 1940.

LG No 35444 on 3 February 1942 - Promotion to Flying Officer as of 8 September 1941.

LG No 35736 on 6 October 1942 - Promotion to Flight Lieutenant as of 8 September 1942.

Peter was recorded as "Was awaiting exit through tunnel which broke from Sagan 24 March 1944". This was part of "The Great Escape".

Due to a massive offensive from the Russians, on 28 January 1945 Stalag Luft 3 Sagan was evacuated by the Germans and 2,000 RAF officers (inclusing Flt/Lt Walker) were marched to Marlag-Milag Nord, a naval POW camp, arriving on 5 February 1945. Camp conditions were appaling

Source : Air Force POW's website and Andy Buckley and www.rafcommands.com

Date record last updated : 30 September 2020



Peter M Walker age 21 just before parting for the Suez Campaign, 1956.

SAC Peter MacDonald 'Mac' Walker, 4137453, Engine Mechanic, Royal Air Force, Nationality : British

Born in Brundall, Norfolk, England

Son of Donald K Walker and Sissie M Walker and husband of Sally Ann Walker

Peter was in the RAF from September 1953 to September 1958. He served on 35 Squadron Canberras from 1954 to 1955 and on 214 Squadron Valiants from 1956 to 1958 at RAF Marham.
Peter took part in the Suez Campaign from Malta from September 1956 to December 1956.

For many years he was the No. 214 Squadron Association Secretary until it disbanded.

He died on 28 October 2020 aged 85.

Source : Peter Walker

Date record last updated : 14 November 2020


Sgt Victor Norman Walker, 1380192, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 23 May 1943, Aged 23

Named on the following Memorial : RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL Panel 168

Son of Charles William and Clara Walker, of Feltham, Middlesex.

Source : CWGC and Nightjar Newsletter Summer/Autumn 2003

Date record last updated : 27 July 2010


William Walker

Source : William Walker

Date record last updated : 17 November 2017


WO William Wall, 565802, Pilot, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 4 June 1942, Aged 25

Buried in BECKLINGEN WAR CEMETERY. Reference : Coll. grave 14. B. 4-8.

Son of William and Elizabeth Wall. Husband of Doris Bertha Wall of Thornton Heath Surrey

Source : Chorley and CWGC and www.aircrewremembered.com

Date record last updated : 2 June 2017


Sgt Wallace

Source : 214 Squadron ORB

Date record last updated : 31 August 2020


Sgt Wallace

Was a regular crew member with Gp/Capt John Aidan Field

Source : Richard Field (son of Gp/Capt John Aidan Field)

Date record last updated : 24 May 2019


Flt/Lt Alexander Cameron Wallace DFC, Navigator, Royal Canadian Air Force, Nationality : Canadian

Served with 214 from 28 February 1943 to 29 July 1943. The crew were based at Chedburgh, Suffolk flying Stirlings, Flt/Lt Wallace having completed 17 Ops with them before posting out.

After 214 Squadron Flt/Lt Wallace did Oboe marking with 109 Squadron at Little Staughton Bedfordshire in the Pathfinder Force. His regular pilot here was W/C W.G. Foxall DSO,DFC. After completing 73 Operations (30 daylight) with 109 Squadron he was posted out tour expired having a total of 90 Operations completed with Bomber Command.

No.1 Initial Training School, Toronto - Graduated 6 December 1941
No. 4 Air Observers's School, London - Graduated 16 March 1942
No. 4 Bombing & Gunnery School, Fingal - Graduated 25 April 1942
No.2 Advanced Navigation School, Pennfield Ridge, N.B. - Graduated 25 May 1942
No.9 Advanced Flying Unit, Penros Wales 8 August 1942 to 7 September 1942
No. 14 Operational Training Unit, Cottesmore Rutlands 8 September 1942 to 30 December 1942
No.1657 Heavy Conversion Unit, Stradishall Suffolk 1 January 1943 to 27 February 1943
No.214 Squadron, Chedburgh Suffolk 1 March 1942 to 29 July 1943 (17 Ops completed)
No.28 Operational Training Unit, Wymeswold Leicestershire 30 July 1943 to 14 February 1944
No.1655 Mosquito Training Unit, Marham Norfolk - 15 February 1944 to 30 March 1944
No. 109 Squadron, Little Staughton Bedfordshire 2 April 1944 to 21 December 1944
Mosquitoes - Oboe marking, Pathfinder Force - 73 Operations completed (30 daylight)
Arrived back in Canada 1 February 1945
Struck off the roll 12 March 1945
Awarded DFC 15 March 1945

See Articles ("N" for nuts section) for a story written by Flt/Lt Wallace about one of his Ops over Germany when their Stirling was shot up by another Stirling injuring the pilot Geoff Shattock.

Distinguished Flying Cross - No. 109 Squadron

Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945 and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Home in Woodstock, Ontario enlisted London, 23 July 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 6 December 1941), No.4 BGS (graduated 25 April 1942) and No.2 ANS (graduated 25 May 1942). Award sent by registered mail 6 May 1949.

The citation reads: "This officer has completed many successful operations against the enemy in which he has displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty."

Public Records Office has recommendation dated 18 December 1944 when he had flown 89 sorties (275 operational hours).

4 Apr 43- Kiel 10 Apr 43 Frankfurt
14 Apr 43- Stuttgart 16 Apr 43 Mannheim
20 Apr 43- Rostock 4 May 43 Dortmund
12 May 43- Duisburg 13 May 43 Bochum
11 June 43- Dusseldorf 13 June 43 GARDENING - Grionde
19 June 43- Le Creusot 21 June 43 Krefeld
22 June 43- Mulheim 24 June 43 Wuppertal
25 June 43- Gelsenkirchen 28 June 43 Cologne
3 July 43- Cologne 11 Apr 44 St.Trond
13 Apr 44- Duren 24 Apr 44 Dusseldorf
30 Apr 44- Duren 1 May 44 Chambly #
2 May 44- Leverkusen 7 May 44 St.Valery #
9 May 44- Berneval # 10 May 44 Ghent #
14 May 44- Coutrai 26 May 44 Lison
27 May 44- Le Clipon # 29 May 44 Xanten
2 June 44- Laval 4 June 44 Sangatte #
6 June 44- St.Pierre du Mont # 6 June 44 Vire #
7 June 44- Versailles # 12 June 44 Arras #
14 June 44- Douai # 16 June 44 Renescure #
22 June 44- Siracourt *# 24 June 44 Flers #
27 June 44- Foret d'Eawy 6 July 44 Coquereaux *#
7 July 44- Vaires # 8 July 44 Scholven
14 July 44- Les Landes Vielle 16 July 44 St.Philibert Ferme *
19 July 44- Thiverny *# 20 July 44 Homberg #
25 July 44- St.Cyr *# 28 July 44 Foret de Nieppe *#
31 July 44- Foret de Nieppe # 1 Aug 44 Anderbelck *#
2 Aug 44- Foret de Nieppe *# 3 Aug 44 L'isle Adam *#
5 Aug 44- Noyelle en Chausse *# 8 Aug 44 Bellecroix *#
18 Aug 44- L'isle Adam *# 23 Aug 44 Castrop Rauxel
25 Aug 44- Brest # 27 Aug 44 Homberg *#
28 Aug 44- Leverkusen 30 Aug 44 Lumbres*#
5 Sept 44- Le Havre *# 9 Sept 44 Le Havre *#
10 Sept 44- Le Havre *# 11 Sept 44 Le Havre *#
14 Sept 44- Wassenaer *# 17 Sept 44 Boulogne *#
17 Sept 44- Westkapelle *# 18 Sept 44 Rheine
20 Sept 44 - Sangatte *# 25 Sept 44 Calais *#
26 Sept 44- Calais *# 5 Oct 44 Frankfurt
6 Oct 44- Dortmund # 11 Oct 44 Fort Fredrick*#
14 Oct 44- Duisburg *# 14 Oct 44 Duisburg #
23 Oct 44- Essen # 28 Oct 44 Westkapelle #
29 Oct 44- Walcheren*# 30 Oct 44 Cologne #
31 Oct 44- Cologne 2 Nov 44 Hallendorf
6 Nov 44- Gelsenkirchen*# 18 Nov 44 Munster *#
30 Nov 44- Duisburg*# 4 Dec 44 Karlsruhe #
6 Dec 44- Osnabruck # 18 Dec 44 Duisburg

(# - marking duties * - daytime operation)

"This navigator will shortly finish his tour with this squadron, having now done 90 trips with Bomber Command of which 72 were with us 53 of these have been marking trips. Flight Lieutenant Wallace has consistently shown a high degree of reliability, the result of keenness to operate and sound knowledge of our equipment. Apart from his keen desire to fly and fight he has unstintingly given of his time in planning operations. He is a willing worker and a splendid member of aircrew."

To this the Officer Commanding, RAF Station Little Staughton, adds on 22 December 1944: "This officer has shown outstanding skill in the manipulation of the special equipment with which his aircraft is fitted. He has at all times shown very much above average ability as a Navigator, and is strongly recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross".

Source : Dave Wallace (son of Flt/Lt A. Wallace)

Date record last updated : 30 April 2011


FS A E Wallace, Navigator

Date record last updated : 1 January 2010


Sqn/Ldr Bruce Gibb Wallace DFC and Bar, 403482, Pilot, Royal New Zealand Air Force, Nationality : New Zealand

London Gazette 35966 2 April 1943

Acting Flight Lieutenant Bruce Gibb WALLACE

This officer has completed 41 sorties, including a number of attacks against targets in the Ruhr.
He is a very determined captain, who has pressed home his attacks with vigour. One night in March, 1943, he captained a bomber detailed to attack Munich. Although the undercarriage and tailplane of the aircraft were damaged by striking a tree when taking-off, Flight Lieutenant Wallace flew on and eventually accomplished his mission successfully. Three nights later he took part in an attack on Essen. Whilst over the target area, his aircraft was held in the searchlights. Despite this, he pressed home his attack from 8,000 feet and dived to 1,000 feet to escape the defences.
On the return flight he engaged a light anti-aircraft gun position and silenced it. Although his aircraft was hit in many places during the operation he flew it safely to base. Flight Lieutenant Wallace has set a courageous and inspiring example.

London Gazette 361313 10 August 1943

Acting Squadron Leader Bruce Gibb Wallace
Bar to DFC awarded

Sgt Ralph Reginald Shipley was part of one of his crews and had completed his tour mid 1943.

Source : London Gazette and Jonathan Shipley (grandson of Sgt Ralph Shipley)

Date record last updated : 13 February 2009



Airman's Service Book cover


Airman's Service Book inside


Wedding of Charles and Edna


Charles (second from the right) with other aircrew. Can anyone name the other crew members?


Charles with crew. Can anyone name the other crew members?


Charles on top of a Flying Fortress. Can anyone name the other crew members?


Charles and Edna on a cruise ship

Charles Louis 'Charlie' Wallis, 1398949, Navigator, Royal Air Force, Nationality : United Kingdom

Buried in Merton & Sutton Joint Cemetery. Reference : D698

Son of Ada and Bill Wallis. Husband of Edna Dorothy Wallis

Brief Career History of Charlie Wallis after service in Royal Air Force :
Charlie Wallis became a teacher, and started work in Spencer Park School, Trinity Road, Wandsworth where he spent practically all his working life. He was a highly respected teacher by staff and pupils alike. He specialised in mathematics and in the earlier part of his career in Physical Education. He had one son, born on 22 May 1959, who he named after him and he was a dedicated family man. He was also dedicated to teaching and the school he taught in and retired when he was 62. He was married to Edna Dorothy Wallis (born on 12 October 1928.), who was dedicated to him all her life. She was a school assistant for most her working life in Clapham. In the earlier part of Charlie's career he lived in Clapham, South London and later 1976 in Morden, Surrey. He died in 1997 age 75.

Brief Career History of his son Charlie Wallis (junior) :
Charlie Wallis (junr) was born on 22 May 1959 in Clapham. He attended a Grammar School and joined the Civil Service in 1979 and finished his career (retired) in 2011. He currently lives in Morden, and has been custodian of his father's photographs and RAF history with 214 Squadron, and has only recently contacted the 214 Squadron website in 2011.

Robert Robson writes :
Charlie Wallis was my house master at Spencer Park School, Wandwsorth, London, between 1967 and 1971.
He quite often mentioned that he had been in the RAF during the war and would sometimes become very morose when talking about comrades that had died.
He always made a point of trying to explain that these men had died for us. I have to admit that as a youngster I never really quite understood.
It was only later in life that I really began to understand.
I developed a keen interest in World War 2 and have studied it quite intensely.
As I said, Charlie, we always referred to him as 'Charlie', as opposed to Mr. Wallis, was my house master. He actually caned me on a couple of occasions. But he said to me at the time, this is going to hurt me more than it's going to hurt you. An old cliche, but I knew that he meant it.
And as I recall, I fully deserved the punishment.
He was a terrific teacher and was really into sports. I was quite a useful footballer and a very good long distance runner, and I guess I became one of his favourites.
I remember after winning a cross country race once Charlie bought me a great big bar of chocolate.
That's the kind of bloke he was.
Fairly naturally, I lost contact with him when I left school.
But I had thought about him many times over the following years.
I was sad to see that he didn't live to a very great age. But he certainly left an impression upon me and I have no doubt many, many others.
Incidentally I remember his son Charlie Jnr. Charlie Snr. was one of the teachers that took us on a week long trip to Swanage and Charlie Jnr. came along as well.
I am so pleased that I came upon your site and found out so much more about Charlie and part of his life.

Source : Charlie Wallis (son) and Robert Robson (former pupil of Charles Louis Wallis)

Date record last updated : 14 March 2020


Sgt T J Walsh

Source : 214 Squadron ORB

Date record last updated : 29 December 2008


Sgt W Walsh, Air Gunner

Source : Ian Hunt


Plt/Off R Jake Walters, Pilot, Royal Canadian Air Force, Nationality : Canadian

He was the pilot for 6 Fortress flights between April 1944 to May 1945 (actual operational take-offs. Does not disregard aborted ops, early returns etc.) He also previously flew Stirlings with 214.

Murray Peden's book , A Thousand Shall Fall, provides an account of one of his fellow Canadians, Jake Walters, on a mission to drop mines. Mine laying was usually less risky than conventional bombing, with mines being dropped from low level. Unfortunately, on this occasion Walter's Stirling flew right over a flak ship which, hearing approaching engines, was ready for them. The impact of the flak blew the aircraft upside-down. Jake, through desperate fight with the controls and fortuitous use of throttles, applied power to only one side and enabled the aircraft to keep rolling and resume level flight.

In addition Paddy Gilpin, who was a member of Jake Walter's crew on that mission. Reports: "On one scary night, especially it being on our very first operational trip and our first Gardening trip, up by the Frisian Islands on July 28/29,1943, we were shot upside down by Flack, carrying a full load of mines at just over 600 feet . I still think it was a miracle to this day how we ever got out of it. May I add that, although we couldn't get the height of all the other big Bombers, the old Stirling could fly rings around them. Funny how we all loved the Old Stirling, although may I state, I have also flown many hours in Lancasters". Thanks to the skill of the pilot and his crew, the robustness of the Stirling and a healthy measure of luck Jake's crew returned safely.

Jake is mentioned 11 times in Murray Peden's book.

Source : Gerhard Heilig and Ian Hunt and Murray Peden

Date record last updated : 14 February 2020


Sgt C G Walton, Date taken POW 16 April 1943, POW number 1165

Imprisoned at POW camp Heydekrug (Silute), Lithuania
Imprisoned at POW camp Sagan (Zagan) & Belaria, Germany
Imprisoned at POW camp Thorn (Torun), Poland OR Oerbke (Fallingbostel), Germany - dates unknown

Sgt Walton was taken POW when Stirling BK653 BU-A, crashed in the village of Bonneuil les Eaux, Northern France on 16 April 1943.

Source : Julien Saguez, French Researcher and Chorley and "Footprints on the sands of time" by Oliver Clutton-Brock

Date record last updated : 30 July 2011


Sgt Robert Gordon Clifford Walton, 1177185, Wireless Operator / Air Gunner, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 29 November 1941, Aged 21

Buried in NOTTINGHAM NORTHERN CEMETERY. Reference : Sec. E/19. Grave 44.

Source : CWGC and Chorley

Date record last updated : 30 October 2020


Source : John Brown

Date record last updated : 4 August 2009


Sgt E K Ward

Source : 214 Squadron ORB

Date record last updated : 29 December 2008



FS Harold Ward (left) and his brother Gordon Ward.
Gordon had joined the Grenadier Guards when this photo was taken.
He was three years older than Harold.
Photo was taken in 1942 or 1943.

FS Harold Ward, 1060035, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 24 May 1943, Aged 20

Named on the following Memorial : RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL Panel 139

Son of Walter and Edith Lydia Ward, of Bircotes, Nottinghamshire.

Source : CWGC and Nightjar Newsletter Summer/Autumn 2003 and Angela Shannon (niece of FS Harold Ward)

Date record last updated : 21 May 2021


WO Harry Ashley Ward DFM

Enlisted at RAF Recruiting Centre, Oxford 25 April 1940.

Recalled to service for Ground defence duties at No 9 Recruits Centre, Blackpool 29 July 1940.

Posted to Hooton Park, Cheshire 9 August 1941.

Posted to ITW Babbacombe 20 September 1940. Completed training 27 December 1940.

Posted to Navigation School at No. 45 Air School, Oudtshoorn, South Africa wef from 9 February 1941 after convoy voyage on Empress of Australia.

Returned to England 17 July 1941-14 August 1941 on Franconia.

Posted to No 11 OTU Bassingbourn 15th September 1941 to 23 November 1941.

Posted to 214 Squadron at Stradishall 24 November 1941 to 30 April 1942.

Posted to 161 Squadron at Tempsford 30 April 1942 , Crashed 22 October 1942.

RAF Hospital Henlow 22nd to 24th November 1942.

RAF Hospital Halton 24th November 1942 to 27th June 1943.

Posted to NCO Aircrew Rehabilitation Centre Hoylake, 27th June 1943 to 27 September 1943.

Posted to RAF Hospital Halton 27 September 1943 to 10 December 1943.

Posted to NCO Aircrew Rehabilitation Centre Hoylake, 10 December 1943 to 6 June 1944.

Posted to RAF Hospital Halton 6th June 1944 to 6th September 1944.

Posted to RAF Tempsford 6th September 1944 to 8th September 1944.

Posted to RAF Hospital Halton 8th September 1944 to 10th November 1944.

Discharged, unfit for further service , 11th November 1944 from RAF Uxbridge.

Extracts from Warrant Officer Ward's log book :

214 Squadron RAF Stradishall

Date Aircraft Wellington Pilot Target
30/11/41 R1789 Q P O Wood Emden DNCO
07/12/41 R1789 Q P O Wood Boulogne DCO
17/12/41 R1789 Q P O Wood Brest DCO
27/12/41 R1789 Q P O Wood Brest DCO
02/01/42 R1789 Q P O Wood Brest DCO
08/01/42 Z3962 T Sgt Chadwick Brest DCO
15/01/42 R1789 Q P O Wood Hamburg DNCO
26/01/42 X9890 F P O Webster Brest DCO
28/01/42 Z1169 W F/S Klassen Munster DCO
12/02/42 X9758 H Sgt Chadwick Scharnhorst & Gneisnau DCO Operation Fuller
13/02/42 Z8951 Sgt Chadwick Search DCO
19/02/42 Z8979 T Sgt Chadwick Essen DCO
22/02/42 Z8962 T Sgt Chadwick Wilhelmshaven DCO
25/02/42 Z1158 S Sgt Chadwick Kiel DCO
27/02/42 Z8962 T Sgt Chadwick Wilhelmshaven DCO
25/03/42 X9979 O Sgt Smith Essen DCO
28/03/42 Z1068 T Sgt Smith Essen DCO
01/04/42z Z1068 T Sgt Smith Hanau DNCO
12/04/42 Z1169 W Sgt Smith Essen landed Manston DCO
14/04/42 DV696 V Sgt Smith Dortmund landed Manston DCO

161 Squadron RAF Tempsford

Date Aircraft Whitley Pilot Target
30/04/42 Z9670 P O Mott As ordered DCO
04/05/42 Z6653 O Flt/Lt Boxer As ordered DNCO
05/05/42 Z6653 O Flt/Lt Boxer As ordered DCO
30/05/42 Z6940 S Sgt Smith As ordered NICKELS DCO
31/05/42 Z. P F/Sgt Peterson As ordered NICKELS DCO
02/06/42 Z6653 O Sgt Smith Tours DCO
10/06/42 Z6653 O Sgt Smith As ordered NICKELS DCO
19/06/42 Z6814 L Sgt Smith As ordered NICKELS DCO
24/06/42 Z6629 N F/Sgt Land As ordered DNCO
07/09/42 Z6828 Sgt Gray BULLSEYE DNCO
23/09/42 Z6658 P O Smith As ordered DNCO
24/09/42 Z6653 O P O Smith As ordered DNCO
17/10/42 Z9160 P O Smith Gibraltar DCO
13/10/42 6629 S/Ldr Gunn Gibraltar - Base DCO
21/10/42 BD 228 S P O Smith As ordered DNCO compass faulty,, crashed on landing Cptn killed

Click on this link to see Harry Ward's memoirs for 26 January 1942

Source : Ian Hunt and Harvey Ward and Aileen Young (son and daughter of Harry Ward)

Date record last updated : 14 February 2020


Sgt Jack Ward, 1064100, Navigator / Observer, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 16 April 1942

Buried in EINDHOVEN (WOENSEL) GENERAL CEMETERY. Reference : Plot JJ. Coll. grave 54-56.

Source : Adrian van Zantvoort and Chorley and CWGC and Ryan Treadwell (great nephew of Sgt Vernon Ernest Egan)

Date record last updated : 10 August 2018


M 'Mick' Ward

There is more information on the crew record for Stirling ??Dixon.

Mick Ward then became their rear gunner and remained with the crew for the rest of their tour until he was shot in the shoulder on the 6th November 1943.

6th November 1943
Special Ops
Their mission was to a marshalling yard in France but at 2000 feet over the target, rear gunner Mick Ward collected a bullet in his shoulder. He left the crew for medical attention.

Source : John Jewsbury (son of R F Jewsbury) and Walter Rowley

Date record last updated : 7 July 2009



Photo taken in Spring 1970

Fg/Off Stewart L Waring, Co-pilot

Stewart Waring writes :
I was a co-pilot on 214 from July 1967- May 1970. I flew 786 hours on the Victor 1. Took part in the Transatlantic Air Race with Flt.Lt. Tony Wright (Captain), and most of the major detachments of that time.
Attached is a photo taken in Spring 1970 with XA932. Note Command Crew badge. Was the CO's co-pilot at that time, Wg.Cdr. Colin Preece.

Source : Stewart Waring

Date record last updated : 9 August 2019


Plt/Off Wilfred Lawrence Warner, Pilot, Royal Air Force, Nationality : Canadian, KIA 29 April 1937, Aged 22

Born in West Transcona, Manitoba, Canada

Wilfred Warner came from Yale Avenue, West Transcona, Manitoba, Canada

Source : Jock Whitehouse and Peter Garside (relative of AC1 Thomas Garside) and Simon

Date record last updated : 24 August 2018


Sgt Alan Leonard Warren, 1385391, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 4 July 1943, Aged 27

Named on the following Memorial : RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL Panel 168.

Son of Alan and Florence Maud Warren, of Ponders End, Middlesex.

Source : CWGC and Chorley

Date record last updated : 22 August 2019


Sgt W E Warren, Nationality : United Kingdom, Date taken POW 27 September 1943, POW number 584

Imprisoned at POW camp Heydekrug (Silute), Lithuania
Imprisoned at POW camp Thorn (Torun), Poland OR Oerbke (Fallingbostel), Germany - dates unknown

Source : "Footprints on the sands of time" by Oliver Clutton-Brock

Date record last updated : 8 August 2011


LAC John Thomas Warriner, 615941, Royal Air Force, KIA 13 December 1939, Aged 24

Son of James and Mary Hannah Warriner, of Bolton Percy.

Source : CWGC and John Jones (Researcher) and Jock Whitehouse

Date record last updated : 5 April 2019


Sgt Douglas Wilmott Waters, 910761, Nose Gunner, Nationality : British, Date taken POW 13 March 1941, POW number 736

Imprisoned at POW camp Barth, Germany
Imprisoned at POW camp Beninia?, Poland
Imprisoned at POW camp Heydekrug (Silute), Lithuania

Born in Dover, Kent, England

Son of Leonard David Waters and Nellie Waters (nee Amos).

Sgt Douglas Wilmott Waters was the only survivor from the crash of N2746 on 13 March 1941and became a POW.

While in captivity, Sgt Waters wrote to Cedric's family about the crash on 9 September 1941. The letter says:

"Dear Miss M. Daniels, I have just received your letter of the ?th July and I am very sorry to confirm that Cedric died with the rest of the crew. He was killed by machinegun fire and the rest of the crew were in the plane when she hit the ground and blew up. I managed to jump just in time and broke my fall in some trees. They are buried in Holland but at what place I do not know but I hope to find out after the war. I am afraid I cannot say more at present and excuse me if this is a gruesome letter over a very nasty business. Wishing you all the best. Yours Sincerely, Douglas W. Waters."

Douglas died on 23 September 2008 in Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England.

He was cremated and his remains were scattered on his father's grave in Whitstable, Kent.

His father died in 1944 and his mother in 1991.

Source : "Footprints on the sands of time" by Oliver Clutton-Brock and Stevin Oudshoorn and CWGC and Chorley and Ian Waters (son of Sgt Douglas Wilmott Waters)

Date record last updated : 8 March 2019


Fg/Off J B Waters, Air Bomber, Royal Canadian Air Force, Nationality : Canadian

Source : Michael Phillips (son of Jack Phillips) and Nightjar Newsletter Spring 2003 and Return of operational Aircrew at 16:00hrs on 31 August 1944 and Murray Peden

Date record last updated : 30 December 2011


Flt/Lt Thomas Cledwyn Watkins AFM, Pilot, 2567833, Royal Air Force, Nationality : United Kingdom. KIA 11 September 1959 Age 28

Date of Birth 13 December 1930 in Ystradgynlais, Swansea, Wales.

He is buried in Ystradgynlais Churchyard. Grave 9.

Named on the following Memorials :
Armed Forces Memorial
Rolls of Honour, Church of St Clement Danes, London

Norman Young writes :
I was Cleds roommate at RAF Thornhill and have a number of B&W photographs. The attachment is from his APO days. If any family member wants other photos they may contact us.

Source : Jock Whitehouse and Armed Forces Memorial and Norman Young

Date record last updated : 8 December 2017


Sgt Ronald Watson DFM, 1014907, Front Gunner

3196 SUPPLEMENT TO THE LONDON GAZETTE, 21 JULY 1942
Award of the Distinguished Flying Medal

"After crossing Holland, Sergeant O'Hara, the navigator, who had skilfully guided his captain thus far, observed 2 enemy fighters closing in. Sergeant Watson, who was tending the injured wireless operator, immediately attempted to man his turret but it was jammed. With the assistance of Sergeant O'Hara, who held his legs, he managed to reach his guns and he then delivered an effective burst at the leading fighter, which caused it to dive towards the sea completely out of-control.
Throughout the operation, these airmen displayed unflinching courage, great fortitude and splendid team work in foiling the attacks of 5 enemy fighters, 3 of which were shot down. Their conduct upheld the highest traditions of the Royal Air Force."

Source : 214 Squadron ORB and London Gazette and National Archives Air Records AIR/50/233/13

Date record last updated : 8 January 2021


Sgt Stanley Watson, 1133624, Air Gunner, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 14 September 1942, Aged 30

Buried in RHEINBERG WAR CEMETERY. Reference : Joint grave 17. G. 21-22.

Son of Robert and Florence Watson, of Middlesbrough, Yorkshire.

Source : CWGC and Nightjar Newsletter Winter / Spring 2004 and 214 Squadron ORB

Date record last updated : 8 February 2019


Sgt William Bassington Watt, 1110178, Front Gunner, Royal Air Force, Nationality : United Kingdom, Date taken POW 4 September 1942, POW number 27005

Imprisoned at POW camp Lamsdorf (Lambinowice), Germany - from 1943, was previously Stalag 8B
Imprisoned at POW camp Lamsdorf (Lambinowice), Germany - until 1943 when it became Stalag 344

Source : Chorley and "Footprints on the sands of time" by Oliver Clutton-Brock and Teunis Schuurman (researcher The Netherlands)

Date record last updated : 20 November 2020

Source : Malcolm Brown (son of John Merlin Brown)

Date record last updated : 23 November 2009


FS H 'Bert' Waugh, Rear Gunner, Royal Australian Air Force, Nationality : Australian

Replacement for FS Houghton (after his death in September 1943) of Bob Mackett's crew RAF Lakenheath early 1944.

Died in Armidale Australia about 2002 aged 92.

Paul Baker provided the above photograph which is signed on the back. Paul writes :
It was signed on rear by himself cross checked with visitors book when he was staying with my grandparents under Lady Ryder scheme. Also my father vouched that it is him. Bob Mackett and other members his crew were regular guests.

Source : Robert Mackett and Vic Pheasant 214 Squadron Association and Paul Baker

Date record last updated : 17 November 2017


Sgt Simon Hughes Weakner, 1032406, Wireless Operator / Air Gunner, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, KIA 22 September 1943

Buried in HANOVER WAR CEMETERY. Reference : Coll. grave 10. D. 5-8.

Date record last updated : 13 August 2017


Sgt Mervyn Alfred Weavers, 1283647, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 26 November 1941, Aged 25

Named on the following Memorial : RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL Panel 54

Son of William Walter and Mildred Weavers husband of Clara Ann Weavers, of Sydenham, London.

Source : Nightjar Newsletter Spring 2005 and CWGC

Date record last updated : 10 August 2009


Sgt George Webber, Wireless Operator, Nationality : Canadian

He was a regular crew member with Flight Lieutenant William Jack Humphries.

Source : Ross Humphries

Date record last updated : 25 January 2015


Sgt G E Webber, Royal Air Force, Nationality : United Kingdom

Managed to bail out of Stirling Mk1 W754 BU-D before it crashed.

Source : Nightjar Newsletter Spring 2004 and Chorley

Date record last updated : 15 December 2017


Plt/Off George Hamilton Webster, J/5471, Pilot, Royal Canadian Air Force, KIA 28 January 1942, Aged 22

Named on the following Memorial : RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL Panel 101.

Son of William and Ellen Webster, of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

The following was written by George's sister, Jessie Grieve, for inclusion in A Place of Honour, Manitoba's War Dead Commemorated in its Geography published by the Manitoba Government. (16 January 1995) George was born August 1, 1919 in Winnipeg. He attended Salisbury School, Morse Place, Lord Selkirk and St. John's Technical schools. He worked for the Department of Education before enlisting. He always had a great love for airplanes he used to drive me to the airport (then Stevenson's Field) and we would watch planes landing and taking off. George enlisted as a clerk in the airforce in 1939 and was stationed at Manning Depot in Toronto. George and I were always very close and I saved money to go visit him. Mother said: "His letters are different - keep your eyes open - perhaps he has a girlfriend!" The "girlfriend" turned out to be private flying lesons.
I went to Toronto Flying Club and watched innumerable take-offs and landings. At that time in history the airforce was only taking university graduates or those who were licensed pilots as air crew. With his commercial pilot license attained, George was able to remuster to air crew. George graduated from the flying training school at Dunnville, Ontario at age 21 and received the highest award at his class wings ceremony.
He was chosen for Bomber Command and trained at Lossiemouth, Scotland. He was then stationed at Stradishall. (Suffolk). He piloted a Wellington Bomber and he and the whole crew were reported missing in action during a raid on Muenster.
Webster Bay (64 G6) in Jefferson Lake was named after George in 1994.

November 2004, George's sister, Jessie Grieve currently lives in Winnipeg. Jessie has visited the Runnymede Memorial and had contacted the families of the other crew members.

Source : Stewart Murray, family connection to Squadron, Ref: Allison: "They Shall Grow Not Old" and WO Harry Ashley Ward and CWGC

Date record last updated : 14 February 2020


Sqn/Ldr Maurice Webster OBE, Navigator / Radar

Passed away on 26 April 2016 aged 88

He was a navigator on Valiants when Sir Michael Beetham was CO, about 1957- 61 period. He lived in Harrogate.

Source : Nightjar Summer 2016 and AVM Eric H Macey

Date record last updated : 8 December 2017


Fg/Off Denis Max Weddell, 137107, Navigator, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 26 July 1943, Aged 25

Son of William and Effie Weddell, of Sheffield husband of Kathleen Weddell, of Pitsmoor, Sheffield.

Source : CWGC and Ian Hunt

Date record last updated : 8 August 2009

Was part of the main crew of Flg/Off E Woodley

Source : Emily Ward (Great niece of Fg/Off Ernest Woodley)

Date record last updated : 28 August 2008

Source : Colin Burningham and W.R.Chorley

Date record last updated : 17 November 2008


Flt/Lt Wells

No further information available yet.

Date record last updated : 3 October 2010


Fg/Off William Wells DFC, 1333704, Rear Gunner

Is listed on Battle Orders for 22 August 1944.

Is also listed on returning operational aircrew on 31 August 1944

First flight was on 5 July 1944.
All of his operational flights were with Pilot George Mackie.
Last flight was on 11 September 1944.

Source : George Mackie and Colin Wells (son)

Date record last updated : 19 March 2010


Rick West, Air Electronics Officer

Source : John Brown

Date record last updated : 17 April 2010



OTU 19 graduation picture

FS William Robert West, R/76959, Pilot, Royal Canadian Air Force, Nationality : Canadian, KIA 2 April 1942

Buried in DURNBACH WAR CEMETERY. Reference : Coll. Grave 2. F. 10-18.

Source : CWGC and Chorley's "Bomber Command Losses" 1942 volume and Mike Smith (great nephew) and Ian Hunt

Date record last updated : 14 February 2020


Flt/Lt Jack Harold 'Shorty' Wetherly DFC MiD, 82716, Co-pilot, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 30 March 1943, Aged 28

Buried in KIEL WAR CEMETERY. Reference : 4. J. 15

Son of Harold William and Gertrude Alice Wetherly husband of Marjorie Alwyn Wetherly, of Carshalton, Surrey. Husband of Peggy Faux

Jack attended Whitgift School before joining his father's paper merchant business in London. Short, stocky, fair, intelligent but unintellectual, with a high-spirited sense of fun and a deep sense of duty, like many young men of his generation he yearned to fly. He enlisted in the RAF Class F Reserve in 1935 and learnt to fly at Hanworth and Redhill, progressing from Blackburn B2s and De Havilland Moths to Hawker Harts and Audaxes. The outbreak of war found him with his wings and 83 solo hours in his logbook but with no aircraft to fly. He therefore spent several frustrating months doing PT on the beach at Hastings before he was posted to No 10 FTS at Tern Hill to complete his flying training. In the midst of all this, on 30 September 1939 he married Peggy Faux in Southport, Lancashire.

From 15 OTU at Harwell he was posted as an Acting Pilot Officer to 214 Squadron at Stradishall in early September 1940. Here he acquired the nickname 'Shorty'. His first two operations, on 10 and 12 September, were as second-pilot to John Leighton Beck (later Wing Commander, DFC and Bar). John later remembered Jack's high-spirited impressions of Abbott and Costello he also did a good Fats Waller and a memorable Carmen Miranda.

On 12 September, forty Wellingtons were sent to attack dock and railway targets in Germany and Brussels. Again flying as second pilot with Beck, Jack went to bomb the marshaling yards at Osnabruck. They successfully found their target - perhaps by homing in on its transmitter. Staying well above the German barrage balloons at 3,500 feet, they were unable to avoid its accurate anti-aircraft defenses. 'G-George' was hit in three places. Fortunately no one was wounded and no serious damage done. . . . They landed safely back at Stradishall after a memorable five and a half hour second trip. Part of 'G-George's' fabric, holed by the ack-ack, was preserved as a memento of their brush with the German anti-aircraft battery which occurred in the early hours of Friday the 13th.!

His next ten ops were with Maurice Hartford (later Flight Lieutenant, DFC). Their aircraft was N2776 BU-G. Several of these early operations formed Bomber Command's contribution to the Battle of Britain: their attacks on the German invasion barges gathering in the Channel ports. His last operation as second pilot was with 20-year-old Sergeant Geoff Cole (later Squadron Leader, DFC) on 5 November, when they attacked Emden.

During his time at Stradishall, Jack and Peggy lived in a flat over the petrol pumps at Haverhill. Among their friends and contemporaries there were George Patrick, the landlord of the local pub, Keith Falconer (Flight Lieutenant, later DFC), 214 Squadron's Navigation Leader, and his actress wife, a lot of soldiers from the King's Own Scottish Borderers, who were stationed locally, and a number of Cockney women evacuated from blitzed London. Bombed from their homes, the latter used to cheer when they saw Jack in uniform.

In mid-November Jack took over as captain of a new crew from OTU. The aircraft was N2802 BU-A.

The last few operations in Jack's tour with 214 Squadron were with Sgt Ray Glass (later Squadron Leader, DFC) and Sgt George McKeand (later Flight Lieutenant, DSO, DFC). His final operation was to Bremen on 12 March 1941, after which the new CO, Richard Jordan (later Air Marshal, DFC), endorsed his logbook "Above the Average"and recommended him for a DFC. He was then posted to 21 OTU at Moreton in Marsh 'for a rest' after his 28 operations.

Jack remained with 21 OTU for ten months, flying in their Navigation Flight and once having to bale out of an Anson over South Wales. Although his DFC did not materialise, he was mentioned in Despatches on 1 January 1942. Later that month he was posted to Number 2 Flying Instructors' School at Montrose to become a qualified flying instructor. Here he met Flying Officer Ray Holmes (the Hurricane pilot who rammed the Dornier that bombed Buckingham Palace on 15 September 1940) and Flight Lieutenant George Unwin (another Battle of Britain pilot, DFM and Bar - later Group Captain, DSO). After a spell as a flying instructor at Cranwell, where his daughter was born, Jack was promoted Flight Lieutenant and, in August 1942, was posted back to Montrose as an instructor of flying instructors.

In January 1943 he was recalled to Bomber Command in time for the start of Air Chief Marshal Harris's main offensive. Converting to the Halifax at Riccall, he joined Leonard Cheshire's 76 Squadron at Linton-on-Ouse, near York, in early February 1943. Here, a year after Butch Harris's appointment as C-in-C, the pace and scale of Bomber Command's activities had been transformed from the tiny, though dangerous, operations of 1940. In the next six weeks, Jack flew 15 operations to Wilhelmshaven, Lorient, Nuremberg, Cologne, Stuttgart, Munich, Duisburg, Berlin and Essen. The Essen trip on 5 March was the first full-scale use of Oboe and marked the beginning of really effective strategic bombing. Three nights later Jack took the new CO, Wing Commander Don Smith (later DSO, DFC) second dickey on his first operation to Nuremberg. Jack himself was about to be promoted to squadron leader to take command of a flight. Meanwhile, March included three Berlin operations: on the 1st, 27th and 29th. On the last of these, Jack's Halifax, DT 744 'K-King', was intercepted by Leutnant August Geiger (later Hauptmann, Knight's Cross, killed 29 September 1943) and shot down over Schleswig-Holstein. He and his crew were all killed. Jack was twenty-eight.

In June 1945 Jack's DFC, which Leonard Cheshire had recommended in March 1943, was gazetted and Peggy went to Buckingham Palace to receive it from King George VI. In June 1947 Peggy married a soldier, Captain Sydney Jary MC of The Royal Hampshire Regiment she died in January 1995. In 1990 Peggy and Sydney's son, Christopher, wrote Portrait of a Bomber Pilot, a biography of Jack. Group Captain Leonard Cheshire VC DSO DFC wrote the Foreword while Ian Lawson, Geoff Cole, Ray Glass, George McKeand, Nigel Walker, Ray Holmes, Don Smith, John Leighton Beck, Mervyn Leyshon and many of Jack's friends and contemporaries breathed life into the book with their vivid memories of those brave, sad times.

Source : Christopher Jary, Author - Portrait Of A Bomber Pilot and CWGC and George Steven

Date record last updated : 27 June 2009


Sgt Whatmough

Source : 214 Squadron ORB

Date record last updated : 8 February 2019



Harry and Edith married on 26 December 1947.

FS J Harry Whatton, 1384559, Wireless Operator, Royal Air Force, Nationality : United Kingdom, Date taken POW 8 July 1944, POW number 423

Imprisoned at POW camp Bankau (Bakow), Poland
Imprisoned at POW camp Luckenwalde

Born in Holborn, Islington, London, UK

Son of Percival Whatton and Dora Elleen Whatton. Husband of Edith Edwards.

On 21 June 1944 he was one of several crew to bail out and evade capture for several weeks until his capture in Antwerp on 8 July 1944.

Harry was responsible for radio communications aboard Fortress SR382 BU-B. He was one of several crew to bail out and evade capture for several weeks until his capture in Antwerp on 8 July 1944.

Keith Stone (Harry's nephew) writes:
"I am in contact with a relative who took the trouble to make a copy of the diary written by Harry in PoW camp. This was done at the time of Harry's death in 1994, when he was 73 years old. In the diary he describes the shooting down in detail and mentions the names of all the crew members. The diary shows he and Tom Sparks were together throughtout their time in Holland and in Stalag Luft 7 and later at Stalag 3A."

This diary records Harry's time as a Prisoner of War from June 1944 until his liberation in May 1945. It also includes his time during the 'The March' of January to February 1945.
Harry clearly had a fixation for liberation and dwells much on the shortage of food. Perhaps an honest reflection of the monotony of PoW camp life.

Harry died in November 1994, aged 73.

Source : Keith Stone (nephew of Harry Whatton) and John Cripps (nephew of Sgt Sydney Bryant) and "Footprints on the sands of time" by Oliver Clutton-Brock and Susan Carr (Harry's daughter) and www. Ancestry.co.uk

Date record last updated : 30 October 2020


Sgt Vernon Philip Walrond Wheaton, 933154, Observer, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : British, KIA 2 April 1942, Aged 32

Buried in DURNBACH WAR CEMETERY. Reference : 2. F. 6.

Son of Francis Drake Wheaton and Eugenie Wheaton husband of Blanche Wheaton, of Wood Green, Middlesex.

Source : CWGC and Chorley's "Bomber Command Losses" 1942 volume

Date record last updated : 3 October 2008


Sgt Harold Frank Vernon Wheway, 925047, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 28 April 1942, Aged 22

Named on the following Memorial : Isle of Wight Memorial page
Named on the following Memorial : RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL. Panel 96.

Son of Harold and Amy Wheway, of New Malden, Surrey husband of T. K. Wheway, of Cardiff.

His body was never found after the aircarft crashed into the sea.

Source : Chorley and CWGC and Bev Nicholes (Isle of Wight Memorial page)

Date record last updated : 10 November 2017


Plt/Off White

Pilot Officer White was the only crew member to survive the crash of Wellington W5452 on 21 September 1941.

Date record last updated : 31 December 2014

Source : 214 Squadron ORB

Date record last updated : 19 February 2021


Sgt Ken W J 'Chalky' White, Air Gunner, Royal Air Force, Nationality : United Kingdom

Alan Mercer has contributed some reminiscences and a photo of Sgts White and Langhorn with 'their' B-17 in a book about 100 Group which came out about a year ago: "Even When The Sparrows Are Walking" by Laurie Brettingham.



"Chalky" White and Freddy Langhorn in front of their aircraft HB817 BU-G, Spring 1945

Source : Ian Hunt and Alan Mercer and Jennifer Baumfield

Date record last updated : 21 February 2009


WO Maurice Charles White, Wireless Operator / Air Gunner, 1166191, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom. KIA 15 March 1945 Age 25

Son of Charles and Lilian White husband of Doreen Hilda Helen White, of Croxley Green, Hertfordshire.

Source : CWGC and Nightjar Spring 2003 and Chorley

Date record last updated : 1 December 2017


Sgt Paget Derick White, 1405182, Air Gunner, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 4 July 1943, Aged 20

Son of William Francis John and Jessie White, of Broadway, Somerset.

Source : Chorley and CWGC

Date record last updated : 5 January 2014


Sgt Phillip James White, 956165, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom. KIA 07 December 1940

Named on the following Memorial : RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL. Panel 20.

Source : Ian Hunt & CWGC


Gordon Whitfiled, Engine Mechanic

Gordon was posted to 214 Squadron after basic training as an engine mechanic in June 1974 and stayed until the squadron was disbanded in January 1977.

Source : Gordon Whitfiled

Date record last updated : 25 January 2015


Flt/Lt Deryck Dibble Whitsun-Jones, Navigator

With 214 Squadron from October 1949 to December 1951, flying Lancasters and then Lincolns. He joined the RAF during the war, trained in Canada and saw active service in Bomber Command, completing a tour of operations with 640 Squadron (flying Halifaxes). He then stayed on in the RAF until 1963, flying a variety of aircraft types with different squadrons.

Source : Nicholas Whitsun-Jones (son)

Date record last updated : 27 June 2009


Fg/Off Clifford John Whittingham, 46402, Navigator, Royal Air Force, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 20 September 1942, Aged 26

Buried in DURNBACH WAR CEMETERY. Reference : 6. J. 3.

Son of John and Emily Mary Whittingham, of Chester.

Source : Chorley and CWGC

Date record last updated : 15 June 2018


Sgt William Wildey DFM, 1052356, Wireless Operator

3196 SUPPLEMENT TO THE LONDON GAZETTE, 21 JULY 1942
Award of the Distinguished Flying Medal

"The objective was successfully bombed, but over the target area the aircraft sustained much damage from anti-aircraft fire. One of the starboard engines was hit and put out of action. Shortly afterwards the bomber was subjected to an attack by an enemy fighter, fire from which caused further damage. Almost immediately a second fighter opened fire and Sergeant Wildey, the 1st wireless operator, was wounded in the arm. Sargeant Watson attended to his injuries. Throughout the operation, these airmen displayed unflinching courage, great fortitude and splendid team work in foiling the attacks of 5 enemy fighters, 3 of which were shot down. Their conduct upheld the highest traditions of the Royal Air Force."

Source : 214 Squadron ORB and London Gazette and National Archives Air Records AIR/50/233/13

Date record last updated : 8 January 2021



This shows Laurence during his pilots training and shows Laurie (right hand top) with three of his pilot training colleagues (unfortunately names unknown).

Sgt Laurence Henry Victor Wiles, 1334775, Air Gunner, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, KIA 22 September 1943

Buried in HANOVER WAR CEMETERY. Reference : 4. B. 1

Steven Amos writes "He served with 214 Squadron flying in Short Stirlings as an air gunner and then went to Canada to train as a pilot. He completed his pilot training in 1943 and then as far as I know re-joined his squadron (although I cannot confirm that) and on his return volunteered to fly with a crew who were missing their rear gunner and sadly lost his life when their aircraft was shot down near Hanover on 22nd September 1943."

Source : GWGC and Steven Amos (Nephew)

Date record last updated : 13 August 2017


Sgt F Alan Wilkes, Co-pilot / Flight Engineer, Royal Air Force

Stations served :
RAF Locking
RAF St Mawgan
RAF St Athan
RAF Bishopscourt
RAF Oulton
RAF Watchfield
Seighford
Wheaton Aston
Sutton Bridge
Volkenrode

Aircraft flown and serviced during 1940-1945 :
Piper Cub
Tiger Moth
Avro Anson
Airspeed Oxford
B/A Swallow
Curtiss Tomahawk
Boulton Paul Defiant
Boeing Fortress
Douglas Dakota
Fairey Battle

While with 214 Squadron Sgt Wilkes had completed 66 Flights by 30 July 1945.

We have been advised that Sgt F Alan Wilkes died on 15th November 2016 aged 92 years.

Source : F A Wilkes and Robert Wilkes (son)

Date record last updated : 13 December 2016


Sgt Jack Kenneth Wilkins, 416581, Pilot, Royal New Zealand Air Force, Nationality : New Zealand, KIA 24 May 1943, Aged 21

Buried in RHEINBERG WAR CEMETERY. Reference : 2. G. 20.

Son of Thomas Owen and Mary Aileen Wilkins, of Te Puke, Auckland, New Zealand.

Initially Buried in Stadtfriedhof.

Source : Dave Pointer (grandson of Sgt WS Clifton-Moggs) and CWGC

Date record last updated : 07 February 2008


Wg/Cdr William Wilkinson, Bomb Aimer, Royal Air Force, Nationality : United Kingdom

Born 16 November 1923
Born in Birkenhead, England

As soon as he was 17, in November 1940, Bill volunteered for the RAF but was deferred until April 1941 and then again until March 1942 when Bill was at last called forward for aircrew training.

At No 26 Operational Training Unit in 1943 Bill crewed up with FS Bob Mackett, FO Alan Deadman, W/Op Gordon Lowe, Mid Upper Gunner Bruce Taggart and Tail Gunner Doug Houghton. In July 1943 Flt Eng Stan Newton joined the crew and they all joined 214 Squadron at RAF Chedburgh the end of the month.

By the Autumn of 1943, Bill and his crew had completed six operations when the Stirling bomber aircraft were withdrawn from front line service the loss rate of these aircraft on the main bombing raids had become unsustainable. They were then one of six crews detached to augment No 161 Squadron at RAF Tempsford dropping supplies to resistance groups and underground agents in occupied Europe.


RAF LAKENHEATH early 1944 with 149 Squadron
Back row L-R
Gordon Lowe (W/op / AG) Bert Waugh (RG) Bruce Taggart (MUG)
Front Row L-R
Al Deadman (NAV) Bob Mackett (Pilot) Bill Wilkinson (BA)

By March 1944, Bill with his Bob Mackett crew had completed their required tour of 30 operations. As the crew split up to go on their various ways, Bill went RAF Wing as an instructor on 26 OTU Wellingtons, also being awarded a commission as a Pilot Officer.

It was on 1st January 1945 when Bill returned to operational flying, this time on the Halifax, joining No. 192 Squadron at RAF Foulsham. In addition to bombing operations, these aircraft carried electronic jamming equipment and German speaking special operators conducting radio spoofing. Bill's new crew were all second tourists and completed 14 ops by the time that Germany surrendered in May 1945. In all, Bill had flown 44 ops in his war service, from March 1942 to June 1945, achieving 629 flying hours.

Bill remained in the RAF in his Flying Officer rank, and undertook the duties of adjutant at a number of RAF bases before becoming the Station Adjutant in the rank of Flight Lieutenant at RAF Boscombe Down. But in September 1946 Bill decided to leave the RAF and returned to Birkenhead and qualified as a stevedore supervisor, only to rejoin the RAF in February 1950.

Promoted to Wing Commander in February 1975, Bill's last job in the RAF was Wing Commander Administration at RAF Uxbridge. On his retirement from the RAF in March 1978, Bill joined the company Sperrys, until April 1986 when he fully retired.

Bill was a founder member of the 214 (FMS) Squadron Association, and served on the Committee for several years as the Treasurer and Auditor.

Vic Pheasant has provided us with a a complete synopsis of Bills' wartime and peacetime RAF service. Click on this link to read the document.

Wing Commander William Wilkinson died on 14 September 2015, aged 91.

Source : Robert Mackett and Vic Pheasant (214 Squadron Association)

Date record last updated : 21 February 2016


Sgt Williams, Co-pilot

Date record last updated : 10 July 2011


Sgt Fernley Thomas Williams, 1201671, Air Gunner, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 28 April 1942, Aged 30

Buried in KIEL WAR CEMETERY. Reference : 5.B.4.

Husband of Winifred Florence Williams, of Bexleyheath, Kent.

Source : Chorley and CWGC

Date record last updated : 27 November 2020


FS J E Williams, R/67724, Pilot

Was part of an aircrew to be seconded to 15 OTU for 215 Squadron on 11 March 1942.

Source : Colin Burningham and W.R.Chorley

Date record last updated : 29 May 2010


Sgt John Philpin Williams, 983072, Wireless Operator / Air Gunner, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 6 January 1942, Aged 26

Son of Ambrose John and Elizebeth Lettice Williams, of Haverfordwest.

Was part of the first aircrew to be seconded to 215 Squadron on 22 December 1941.
On 6 January 1942, he was killed in an accident to Wellington L7863 of 3 Group Training Flight at Newmarket while seconded to 215 Squadron aged 26.
See Photo album 4 "The exodus of 214 Squadron to 215 Squadron".

Source : Colin Burningham and CWGC

Date record last updated : 16 June 2010


Sgt John William Williams, 1094029, Air Gunner, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, KIA 15 April 1943, Aged 31

Buried in SEPT-SAULX CHURCHYARD. Reference : Grave 6.

Son of Louis Henry and Arabella Williams husband of Gertrude Jane Williams, of Marchamley, Shropshire.

Date record last updated : 17 December 2010


Sgt N W Williams, 2226960, Air Gunner, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

Sgt N W Williams trained as an Air Gunner and qualified on 30 June 1944 at No 12 Air Gunner's School, Bishop's Court.

He then went to 1699 CU as part of Flg Off Mark Stainier's crew where they both did numerous training ops. Murray Peden was involved with some of these training operations.

He joined 214 Squadron and flew combat sorties from October 1944 to April 1945, mainly as part of the crew that flew with Fg/Off Marc Stainier (also known as Fg/Off Mark).

His first tour of 36 operational sorties was completed on 13 April 1945.

Sgt Williams is recorded as serving in India in February 1946

Source : Ian Hunt and Vic Tyler-Jones (President, Llai Local History Society) and 214 Squadron ORB

Date record last updated : 17 April 2020


WO Roland 'Ron' Williams '39/45 Aircrew Europe, Clasp, Defence, 1834473, Flight Engineer, Royal Air Force, Nationality : United Kingdom

Born in Thurnscoe, Yorkshire

Buried in SANDWELL CREMATORIUM WEST BROMWICH

Son of William and Ethel Williams nee Probert. Husband of Elsie Williams

"My first attempt to join the RAF was in January 1932, when I was 18 years old, and I was rejected because I was four teeth short of a full set. Then in 1938, I applied to join the RAFVR but the particular squadron was being disbanded. So it wasn't until 1942 that I was able to achieve my ambition by enlisting for aircrew directly from a reserved occupation.

Jimmy Nuttall and I arrived at St Athan from our initial training at Blackpool on 7th December 1942 and began our flight engineer's course twelve days later, staying together throughout until the end of our tour of operations with 214 Squadron in November 1944. At St Athan on Saturday afternoons we used to go to Cardiff on the bus to visit the Prince of Wales Theatre, where we saw some very good shows, having paid sixpence for a seat in the gods. One particular Saturday we decided to hitch-hike along with a few other airmen. Being quite a good sprinter, I was first to a pick-up truck that pulled up and got into the cab with the driver. After moving off, I looked back to see Jimmy and three or four others walking back towards the main gate. the driver was having a chuckle. I asked, "What happened?" and he said, "See those fifty-gallon drums in the back? Well, my job is emptying cesspits and you can guess what's in them!" The lads had grabbed the tail- and side-boards. They immediately let go, but had to return to the station to wash their hands - and a couple of them their tunics.

Sgt. George Wright's crew had just finished their training on Wellingtons when they were blessed with two members of the Williams clan at 1657 Conversion unit Stradishall - Bob (Taffy) and Ron (myself). Two incidents during our training at Stradishall that were involved in come to mind. The first was when we had taken off for our first cross-country flight and had been airborne for only a few minutes, and the port inner engine caught fire. The fire was successfully put out and the prop feathered. Arriving back over base we were instructed to jettison fuel from the main tanks (nos. 2 & 4 on each mainplane) which in total capacity would be around eleven hundred gallons of 100-octane petrol. This we did with the whole station watching and we landed safely.
The second incident occurred when we were performing circuits and landings at night from an American base. After three and a half hours of ups and downs in Q Queenie, we were standing at the edge of the runway prepared to take off when I checked the accumulators and realised there would be insufficient power to raise the undercarriage, so we taxied to dispersal with the intention of recharging. Unfortunately, however (or rather, fortunately as it turned out) the American trolley-acc. Connections didn't fit, so we informed base who told us to leave the aircraft there and they would send a crew-bus for us. The next morning, another crew were sent out with the appropriate trolley-acc. To bring Q Queenie back to base, but arriving over Stradishall the undercarriage became stuck in the half-way down position. When all efforts to move it either way had failed, and after over an hour's orbiting, instructions were given to belly land her at Newmarket. Lucky us! I was told that Queenie had previously been ditched in Bradwell Bay and then salvaged after floating for sixteen hours. I wonder if she ever got airborne again?
We were posted to Downham Market as an operational crew, and once again, on our first assignment to drop 5,000 lbs of mines near the Friesian Islands, we had trouble with the undercart which refused all attempts to raise it by conventional methods except hand winding (376 turns of each wheel by crank-handle!). In desperation I gave the control rods which ran alongside of the fuselage a hefty kick with my flying boot, then called the skipper to try again - and this time the down lock was freed and the undercart retracted. We completed our op, dropping the mines from 3,000 feet.
Our second minelaying trip was a visit to the Ile de Ré, lasting just under six hours and non-eventful: 5,000 lbs of mines from 5,000 feet. But on our return from a bombing trip to Hazebrouk in France, we feathered the port inner engine and lost all electric power. Even the R.T. Died on us after George had received permission to make a right-hand circuit for landing. Freddie Mullenger, the navigator, was standing between the skipper and me to pass messages, and I informed George through him that I was going aft to wind the tail wheel down and then the main wheels. The tail wheel was no trouble (100-odd turns of the crank) but when I turned to get back to the centre section I was thrown off-balance and started to spew. I still had my mae-west on and was sweating profusely, while I was heaving and crawling through the spew on my hands and knees. Johnny Bates, our wireless op, and myself each cranked down a wheel and I made sure they were locked in the down position, then I went forward to pass a message to Freddie and advise George that I was going to wind the flaps down when our heads collided and George landed with another Stirling ahead of him on the runway, which somehow he overtook, and managed to stop just short of the end. As we were putting our gear away in the locker room, Jimmy Southgate, the rear gunner, put his arm around my shoulders and said, "Bloody good show, Ron!" - and that's when I broke down and swore I wouldn't fly again, But we were there again the next night on a "bullseye" exercise!
Between arriving at 214 F.M.S. Squadron, Downham Market, on December 26th 1943 and January 14th 1944 we had completed four operations. Then we moved with the squadron to train on B17 Flying Fortresses at Sculthorpe. At one instruction class, Warrant Officer Mackie (as he was then) asked the American instructor if it was possible to loop a Fortress. "Hell, no!" came the reply, but as soon as Mackie was let loose to fly the machine, that's just what he did. And as we watched, I remember a Yankee sergeant's stomach also doing a loop and he was as sick as a dog. Mackie got a severe reprimand, but I suspect the Winco had his tongue in his cheek as he handed out the same. Mackie had a reputation of being a bit of a daredevil, and one day asked me to accompany him as his flight engineer to Newmarket, as Pedro, his engineer, was sick. I agreed and on the way over we came upon a formation of American fortresses, so Mackie decided to have a little fun by first of all putting his mainplane between that of another Fortress and its tail, then dropping back and putting his nose within a couple of car-lengths of the tail of another - with the tail gunner mouthing epithets and threatening us with his twin point five Brownings, or trying to thumb us away. Well, we got to Newmarket and back!
On airsickness: I used to get airsick very often but I learned the trick of sticking two fingers down my throat to make myself sick when I began to feel rough, open the side window, and with my head turned aft, rid myself of stomach contents. I could then carry on with my job. But I was caught out one day when I didn't turn my head quickly enough, and spewed into my oxygen mask. Scrub as I would afterwards, I could not rid the mask of the smell, so after a week I had to exchange it for a new one. Johnny Bates used to tease me at the after-flight meal, saying "How about a bit of greasy pork, Ron, going up and down your throat on a piece of string?" He'd never been airsick and didn't realise how it felt until one night when we had been in ten tenths cloud and great turbulence, having climbed up to 26 thousand feet and descended to 12 thousand without getting out of it, the whole crew except George and Freddie succumbed. Ricky Sherburne, our bomb aimer, had been eating chocolate and was flying in the top turret - George's peaked cap was just below the turret and received what Ricky rejected. I was sick into the tail wheel hand-cup into which I would later have to plunge my hand to lock and unlock the tail wheel to taxi to dispersal. At the after-flight meal, it was my turn to ask Johnny "How would you like a piece of greasy . " I got no further: he was up from the table like a shot and off into the ablutions with his hand over his mouth. But I felt sorry for him losing his meal, although I enjoyed mine. And he never ribbed me again.
The Squadron had moved to Oulton approximately 12 miles from Norwich on May 16th, 1944, the officers being billeted in Blickling Hall, residence of Lord Lithgow, and the NCO's in nissen huts, which reminds me that sometimes in cold weather we could wake up with sufficient globules of condensation on the blanket to scoop up and wash our hands. Yet we didn't catch cold. In one hut dwelt an Australian Warrant Officer bomb- aimer of whom the powers that be had lost track. He unofficially took charge of the ablutions and would press a uniform for half-a-crown or launder a whole bunch of washing for the same amount. Where he obtained his soaps and powder was a mystery, but I'll bet he went back to Aussie-land with a small fortune.
July 4th, Independence Day 1944. Midnight, and the Yanks were celebrating in their camp area a short distance from our billets, yelling, whooping and firing revolvers, while we were trying to get some sleep. I went out through the hedge in my pyjamas just in time to see their C/O's car approaching. He stopped. The car was a right-hand drive, so all he had to do was hear my complaint, stick a bloody great hand out and shove me backwards into the hedge and nettles - and drive off without a word.
Mentioning pyjamas brings back a memory of one chap in our billet who took a fancy to a pair of blue and white ones I had. I told him that if we got the chop he could have them. We had taken part in the Koenigsberg attack and been diverted to Honiley near Coventry, landing there at 06-55 after a ten hours and ten minutes Squadron airborne record flight. Of course, because we hadn't returned the previous night, he had come to the conclusion that he would exercise his right! But he gave them back with no hard feelings. I wasn't a regular drinker but did get drunk at a mess party. Dickie Gunton, the engineers' leader, and a WAAF officer put me to bed in those same pyjamas and I still turned up on time at the flights next morning.
On the night of June 2nd 1944, three of our B17's - those of Sqd/Ldr Bill Day, Johnny Cassan and George Wright - took part in the attack on the marshalling yards of Trappes, about forty miles south-west of Paris. I read in the Daily Express some years later that this was the raid that opened the second front. We were flying in F Freddie and as we approached the target, a huge orange flare was dropped on our tail, so George decided to move off track and fly a parallel course. Immediately alongside us appeared a Halifax in the full glare of the flare, exchanging fire with a Messerschmidt 210. The Halifax went down with engines on fire and the Me. Following with the rear gunner firing back, but we saw no chutes from the Halifax. From then on we saw many aircraft shot down, with Fred, our navigator, logging their positions until he had no space to log more. The official report the next morning quoted sixteen of our aircraft were lost. We had been attacked by a Me. 110 and of course, George had taken evasive action by the usual corkscrewing, but we sustained a few holes from bullets which miraculously passed diagonally between the two waist gunners Bob Williams and Don Robson.
Warrant Officer Archibald was another of the Mackie ilk who liked to have a bit of fun in the air. I was to go with him on another sortie to Nevers, another town south of Paris, on 15th July 1944. On the afternoon air test we came upon a cricket match taking place at Pakenham. Some joker in the crew suggested to Archie that he beat it up. Down went Archie with quite a clip on, along the full length of the pitch, and the cricketers throwing themselves flat on their faces. As we climbed away, the same joker said, "Round again, Archie!" and the voice of the wireless operator came over the intercom: "Wait a second, Archie, till I wind the trailing aerial in." That aerial was seventy feet long with ¾" lead balls interspaced along its length. He didn't make the second run! We were over the target that night and the rear gunner reported a fighter on each of the quarters (port and starboard). But we had to be prodded by Archie as to their position because the gunner was slow with his commentary. Suddenly it was "Corkscrew starboard go!" and Archie threw the aircraft over into that manoeuvre and we escaped. But as we came out of the corkscrew a Focker Wolf came round our bows almost within touching distance, and I remember saying to Archie, "Bloody hell! Here's another one! Such a near miss!" The next day my skipper told me not to take part in any more spare operations or I might finish my tour before the rest of the crew, and he would hate to have to get another engineer. Nice to be appreciated!
It is now 1995 and I am in my 82nd year. Every anecdote I have outlined here is as clear in my mind as though it happened yesterday. I was fortunate to fly with the following members of a crew that knew their jobs and carried them out so well: George Wright, pilot, Freddie Mullenger, navigator, Johnny Bates, wireless operator, Stan Bayliss, special duties wireless operator, Bob (Taffy) Williams, waist gunner, Don Robson, waist gunner, Ricky Sherburne, upper turret gunner cum bomb-aimer, with a very special mention for Jimmy Southgate, rear gunner, who cold bring tears to my eyes by hugging me round my shoulders."
His last day of service with the RAF was 6 August 1946.

From his service and release book, we know that as a W/O he was paid 20 shillings a month, so on 22 July 1946 after 42 months service he received a war gratuity of £42 plus post-war credits of sixpence a day for 1295 days, making a total of £76 7s 6d.

Is listed on Battle Orders for 22 August 1944.

Is also listed on returning operational aircrew on 31 August 1944

He died on 6 August 1999 aged 85.

Catherine writes (July 2009):
"He and my mother regularly attended the Squadron reunions, and greatly enjoyed meeting their old friends there. My mother, Elsie Williams, now aged 93, continued to attend until a couple of years ago, together with Stan and Rona Bayliss, but has been unable to do so any more since Stan's death three years ago." He was a founder member of the 214 Squadron Annual Reunion, which he attended faithfully until his death.

Sadly Roland's wife Elsie passed away on 16 February 2017 aged 100. Please see Nightjar Summer 2017.

Source : David Wright (son of Flt/Lt George Wright) and George Mackie and Roland Williams memories and Catherine Sommer (daughter of Roland Williams)


Personnel of No.7 Squadron RAF, 1945 - History

Royal Air Force (RAF) Officers
1939-1945

Looking for details on a RAF officer not listed here yet?
Just e-mail me, and I might be able to help out.
Of course, any additions, corrections etc. can also be e-mailed.

For detailed biographies of key RAF personnel (Air Commodore and higher) there is already an excellent website: www.rafweb.org
Only RAF officers of ranks below Air Commodore will be shown here in detail. Abbreviations and explanations can be found at the help page.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

D.R.S. Bader to V.G.L.D. Byrne
B ader ,
[Sir] Douglas Robert Steuart

Second son of Frederick Roberts Bader (1869?-1922), Maj. IARO, VD, IES, and Jessie Scott-Mackenzie (1876-) [she remarried (1922) Ernest W. Hobbs].
Married 1st (05.10.1933, Hampstead register office formal marriage 05.10.1937, St Mary Abbots church, Kensington) Olive Thelma Exley
Edwards (18.12.1907 - 24.01.1971), daughter of Lt.Col. Ivo Arthyr Exley Edwards (1881-1947), RAF (retired), and Olive Maude Amy Donaldson (1885?-1957) [she remarried (1919) Arthur M. Addison] no children.
Married 2nd (03.01.1973) Mrs Joan Eileen Murray, daughter of Horace Hipkiss.

B arnett ,
Reginald James William

Only son of Mr and Mrs W. Barnett, formerly from Dover and Capel.
Married (19.05.1936, Southsea) Diana Mary Allan (born 27.07.1913, Reigate, Surrey) [her elder sister married F/Lt. J.F.L. Zorn, RAFO] three children.


Traces of World War 2 Royal Air Force - No. 7 Squadron 01/01/1940 - 30/06/1940

In the spring of 1938 No.7 received its first modern monoplanes, the Whitley I. These were replaced by Whitley IIIs in late 1938, but during April/May, 1939, the squadron was re-armed yet again - this time with Handley Page Hampdens.

When the Second World War broke out the squadron was at Doncaster and engaged in training crews to operational standard for No.5 Group. It moved back to Finningley and then to Upper Heyford (No.6 Training Group) during the third and fourth weeks of September 1939, and in April, 1940, lost its identity when it was absorbed into No.16 OTU. It re-formed at Finningley at the end of April - again as a Hampden bomber squadron - but was disbanded three weeks later.

Re-formed again in August 1940, at Leeming, No.7 became the first squadron in Bomber Command to have four-engined bombers, and by early 1941 had moved to Oakington and was ready to begin operations with its new Short Stirlings. On the night of 10/11th February 1941, No.7 made its first bombing attack with the Stirlings - on oil storage tanks at Rotterdam - and just over two months later paid its first visit to Berlin. Among other early targets were Brest, Rotterdam, Emden (this was the target when the squadron made its first daylight raid, on 28th April), Hamburg and Mannheim. In 1942 minelaying was added to the squadron's duties and in May and June its Stirlings took part in the 1,000-bomber raids on Cologne, Essen and Bremen. Later that year it was one of the five squadrons selected to form the nucleus of the Pathfinder Force.

Losses 01/01/1940 - 30/06/1940

01/01/1940: Training, UK. 1 a/c lost, 3 KIA, 1 WIA

01/01/1940: Training, UK

Type:
Hampden I
Serial number: P1260, MG-?
Operation: daytime cross country navigation exercise
Lost: 01/01/1940
Pilot Officer (Pilot) Horace M. MacGregor, RAF 41855, 7 Sqdn., age 19, 01/01/1940, Harrow (Pinner) New Cemetery, UK
Sergeant [Navigator] Robert J. Bailey, RAF 581258, 7 Sqdn., age 19, 01/01/1940, Boldon (Whitburn) Cemetery, UK
Sergeant (W.Op.) Thomas O. Dennis, RAF 518112, 7 Sqdn., age 28, 01/01/1940, Birkenhead (Flaybrick Hill) Cemetery, UK
Corporal (W.Op./Air Gunner) Ted Brightmore - injured.
From: Peak District Air Crashes and BBC's WW2 Peoples War: 'The crew of P1260 were on a daytime cross country navigation exercise from RAF Upper Heyford, they flew to Blackpool and then out over the Irish Sea. The weather over the sea was poor and the crew became lost in low cloud and snow. Corporal Brightmore was in the process of winding out the trailing aerial so the crew could make contact with an RAF station to get a fix on their location when the aircraft ploughed into Snaefell and burst into flames.'

"I remember a terrific thump and tearing sound, being drenched in petrol, a big explosion, rolling into some snow which must have put on my personal fire and saved my life."
- Cpl. Ted Brightmore (in a 1990 letter to Harry Jacobson)

'Corporal Brightmore was flung from the wreck as it broke up but received fairly serious burns, he staggered do the hill eventually reaching a cottage in Sulby Glen. He was treated in Ramsey for three months before being transferred back to Upper Heyford where he was placed on non-flying duties.'

See Hampden Mk.I P1260 for pictures of the crash site circa anno 2000

Sources: CWGC and Peak District Air Accident Research

back up

David Clark 'A-Apple'
Peter D. Cornwell, The Battle of France, Then and Now, 2008
Docherty 'No. 7 Bomber Squadron RAF in World War 2' (2007)
R Edwards DSO 'In the thick of it- autobiography of a bomber pilot' (Images Publishing 1994)
T G Mahaddie 'Hamish' (Autobiographical Stirlings 1942) (Ian Allen 1989)
Chris Ward '7 Squadron' (Bomber Command Profile no. 1)
West 'Nothing heard after take off: a short history of 7 squadron 1914-74' (West 1974)


Personnel of No.7 Squadron RAF, 1945 - History

No 6 - 10 Squadron Histories

Formed on 31 January 1914, again at Farnborough, it transferred most of its aircraft to the other squadrons in August 1914 and did not arrive on the Continent (Belgium), itself until October. However, it was soon on the move as the British Army retreated back into France. It immediately adopted the role of a corps squadron, which it maintained throughout the war.

Following the Armistice it was transferred to Iraq, arriving in July 1919. Operating in the Army Co-operation role in Northern Iraq, equipped with Bristol Fighters, the squadron remained there for ten years before moving to Egypt in 1929.

At the same time it re-equipped with Gordons and assumed the bomber role, Harts replacing these in 1935. Following problems in Palestine, the squadron relocated there in 1938 reverting to the Army Co-operation role with Hardy's, adding Gauntlets and Lysanders later.

It eventually left Palestine and started operations in the Western Desert, with Lysanders, in September 1940, although the squadron HQ remained in Palestine. Gradually Hurricanes replaced Lysanders in the tactical reconnaissance role, being fully equipped by June 1941. However, in August, these were replaced by Lysanders and Gladiators with some Blenheims and Hurricanes being added later, but all were removed again in January 1942 when the squadron assumed maintenance duties.

Receiving Hurricane IIDs in April 1942, the squadron now took on the role for which it would excel - 'tank busting', its Hurricanes being fitted with two 40mm under the wings. This role is commemorated in the nickname and its unofficial badge - 'The Flying Can-openers'. Converting to rocket firing Hurricanes, it fought through Italy and over the Adriatic and Balkans, returning to Palestine in July 1945.

It eventually replaced its last Hurricanes in late 1946, although it had operated some Spitfires since late 1945, becoming the last squadron to operate the type as first line equipment. Following Israeli independence in 1946, the squadron moved to Cyprus where it re-equipped with Tempests. In November 1947 it went to the Sudan, returned to Egypt in May 1948 and then continued to move around the Middle East until 1956 when it moved back to Cyprus. During these moves it had re-equipped with Vampires in 1949, Venoms in 1954 and the Canberra in 1957.

On 13 January 1969, it was reduced to cadre and returned to the UK, the first time it had operated from there since 1914 where on 7 May 1969 its badge and standard were handed over to a new No 6 Squadron which had been in formation as a Phantom unit at Coningsby in the tactical reconnaissance and ground attack role. However, on 1 July 1974, No 6 (Designate) Squadron began forming at Lossiemouth as a Jaguar unit and on 30 September 1974 the Phantom unit was disbanded with the squadron number-plate being transferred to the Jaguar unit. In November 1974 the new No 6 Squadron moved south to RAF Coltishall, where it remained until April 2006, when it moved to Coningsby. However, plans for the withdrawal of the Jaguar were accelerated and the squadron was disbanded for the first time in its history on 31 May 2007. The unit reformed as a Typhoon unit on 6 September 2010 at RAF Leuchars, with their Standard being presented on 8 September where it took over the Northern QRA from the Tornadoes of No 111 Sqn in early 2011.

Standards Battle Honours*
Award of Standard originally announced on 7 Sep 1943, effective from 1 Apr 1943 but presented:-
ZD Nov 1938 - May 1939
XE allocated May 1939, but probably not carried
JV Sep 1939 - Jul 1943, Jan 1946 - Oct 1949
EA - EZ Aug 1986 - Current

Photos of No 6 Squadron 1952

No 6 Squadron Association: -

Webmaster : - George Robertson

The last squadron to be formed before the start of world war one, an event which took place on 1 May 1914 at Farnborough. Remaining in Britain until April 1915, it undertook experimental duties. When it eventually arrived in France it was as a corps squadron, initially using BE2's and later RE8's. Returning to Britain in September 1919 it disbanded on the last day of the year.

Its next reincarnation was in the role for which it would spent the bulk of its existence, a bomber unit, which took place on 1 June 1923 at Bircham Newton equipped with Vickers Vimys. Virginias arrived in 1927, Heyfords in 1935 and eventually Whitleys in 1938, although some Wellesleys had been allocated to 'B' Flight, but this was hived off to form No 76 Squadron on 12 April 1937.

Hampdens replaced Whitleys in April 1939 but the squadrons was allocated to advanced training on 1 June 1939, eventually merging with its offspring, No 76, to form No 16 OTU on 4 April 1940. The squadron briefly reformed on 30 April 1940, with Hampdens, but disbanded once again on 20 May 1940.

However, on 1 August 1940, the squadron was reformed at Leeming and it was now allocated the major task of introducing the Stirling bomber into RAF service, taking them into action for the first time on 10 February 1941. It continued to operate Stirlings, initially as part of No 3 Group and as part of the Pathfinder Force/No 8 Group until 28 June 1943, when it converted to Lancasters.

It flew Lancasters for the rest of the war and in the immediate post war era, before re-equipping with Lincolns in August 1949. From 1 February 1949 until 8 December 1953, No 7 was linked with No 76 squadron in an attempt to maintain squadron identities. Whilst equipped with Lincolns, it sent detachments to Malaya to take part in Operation Firedog until 1 January 1956, the squadron disbanded at Upwood. A new era arrived on 1 November 1956, when No 7 joined the V-Bomber force equipped with Valiants at RAF Honington, but it was not destined to be re-equipped with the newer V-Bombers and on 1 September 1962, the squadron disbanded again, having moved to Wittering on 26 July 1960.

It was nearly eight years, May 1970, before No 7 returned and this time it was as a Target Facilities unit at St Mawgan in Cornwall, equipped with Canberras. Carrying out these duties until 1981, the squadron disbanded again to be reformed in yet another role, support helicopter, on 1 September 1982 at Odiham. Now equipped with Chinooks, it provides the UK based medium lift capacity to the Army.

HRH Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester

LT Nov 1938 - Sep 1939
MG Aug 1940 - Apr 1951
XU Jun 1943 - 1945
EA - EZ Used on Chinooks

No 7 Squadron Association: - Chairman: Malcolm Reeves, 5 Farfield Avenue, Knaresborough, North Yorkshire, HG5 8HB Tel: 01423 860999, email malreevesATyahoo.com

With the growing need for air support on the Western Front new squadrons began to be formed with No 8 being formed on the New Year's Day 1915 at Brooklands. Operating throughout world war 1 in the corps reconnaissance role, first with BE2's and later FK8's, it received Bristol Fighters just after the Armistice remaining on the continent until July 1919 when it returned to Britain, disbanding at Duxford on 20 January 1920. Reforming in Egypt on 18 October 1920 with DH9As, it moved to Iraq in February 1921, the RAF having been given responsibility for policing the area. In 1927 the squadron moved again, this time to Aden, where it would remain except for a short period until 1967.

January 1928 saw the DH9As replaced by Fairey IIIF, with Vincents coming in April 1935. Some Blenheims were taken on strength in 1939 but Vincents remained the main equipment until 1942. During this period No 8 carried out attacks against Italian East Africa and after the collapse of the Italian forces in the area, they undertook anti-submarine patrols and internal security operations. Hudsons joined the squadron in March 1943 and Wellingtons in December and by the end of the following month, the squadron was wholly equipped with the type. The squadron continued in this vain until 1 May 1945, when it was disbanded.

Two weeks later the squadron was reformed by re-numbering No 200 operating in India before moving to Ceylon, where they were now flying Liberators on special duty missions and supply dropping to irregular forces in Malaya. Following the Japanese surrender operations continued but in November 1945, the squadron once again disbanded.

In its absence No 114 Squadron had been 'holding the fort' in Aden and on 1 September 1946 No 8 returned to its 'ancestral home' when No 114 was re-numbered. It now reverted to the internal security role it had fulfilled up to 1943 but now equipped with Mosquitos and later Tempests, Brigands, Vampires and Venoms until January 1960 when it received Hunter FGA 9s, although it had used Meteors fighter recce aircraft at times. Hunter FR 10s also joined the squadron in April 1961 and it continued to operate both these models up until its disbandment on 15 December 1971 at Sharjah, the squadron having left Aden in 1967, when British forces withdrew from the Protectorate.

The squadron came into existence again on 8 January 1972, this time in the UK - the first time the squadron had serve here since 1920 - but in a totally different role. Equipped with modified Shackleton Mk 2s it took on the role of Britain's airborne early warning shield. It continued to fly these antiquated aircraft in an extremely 'high-tech' role until 30 June 1991, but instead of re-equipping with the Nimrod AEW aircraft, which was cancelled due to technical shortcomings, it reformed the following day at Waddington to introduce the Boeing Sentry AEW Mk 1 into service.

HRH The Duke of Gloucester.

Vickers Vincent of No 8 Sqn, probably taken in Ethiopia in 1936

Christmas Dinner Menu, December 1918

No 8 Squadron Association: - The Secretary, VIII Squadron Association, c/o No.8 Squadron, RAF Waddington, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, LN5 9NB

No 9 was the first squadron to be formed outside the UK when the HQ Wireless Unit at St Omer was raised to squadron status on 8 December 1914. However, its existence was short-lived as the decision was taken to distribute wireless facilities in all squadrons, therefore the resources of No 9 were broken up and allocated to the other corps squadrons, the unit being formally disbanded on 22 March 1915.

It was reformed a few days later, on 1 April 1915, at Brooklands in the radio training role. A move to Dover also brought coastal patrols into its remit. It moved back to France in November 1915, carrying out bombing and recce missions, until late 1916 when it became a corps squadron, its BE's being replaced by RE8's in May 1917.

Having received a few Bristol Fighters, these began to replace the RE's in February 1919, the squadron remaining on the continent until the following June, when it returned to the UK as a cadre and disbanded on 31 December 1919.

Re-formation in what would become its main role until the present day, a bomber (strike) unit, took place on 1 April 1924, equipped with Vimys. Specialising in night bombing, as commemorated by the squadron badge and motto, the squadron was successively equipped with Virginias of various makes from 1925, Heyfords from 1936 and Wellingtons from 1939.

On 18 December 1939, the squadron took part in the disastrous daylight raid on Wilhelmshaven losing five aircraft and bringing about an end to RAF attempts to carry out daylight raids with 'heavy' bombers. Following a detachment to Lossiemouth during the Norwegian campaign the squadron settled down into the routine of a main force bomber squadron within No 3 Group.

July 1942 brought the last Wellington operations and conversion to Lancasters as well as a move to No 5 Group. On 12 November 144, together with No 617 Squadron, they dropped 12.000lb 'Tallboys' on the Tirpitz in Thomso fiord, causing her to capsize. As the end of the war in Europe loomed, No 9 was earmarked for operations in the Far East as part of 'Tiger Force', which was commanded by AM Sir Hugh Lloyd who had commanded No 9 at the beginning of the war. However, the Japanese surrender after the dropping of two A-bombs brought these plans to a close, although the squadron did move to India to undertake aerial survey work until April 1946.

Lancasters were replaced by Lincolns in July 1946 and in May 1952 the first Canberras arrived bringing the squadron into the jet age. In 1956, the squadron used its Canberras in action in both Malaya (March-May) and Egypt (October). The squadron disbanded for the first time since 1919 on 13 July 1961. A new No 9 Squadron appeared at Coningsby on 1 March 1962, equipped with Vulcans, it was part of Britain's nuclear deterrent. However, in 1969 the squadron was moved to Cyprus to form part of the Akrotiri Strike Wing, together with No 35 Squadron. The rundown of Britain's overseas bases brought the squadron back to Waddington in 1975 where it remained until disbanding on 1 May 1982.

On 1 June 1982, it became the first squadron to be equipped with the Tornado GR1 at Honington, moving to Bruggen in RAF Germany in 1986. With the rundown of RAF Germany, the squadron relocated back to the UK at Marham, from where it operated against Daesh in Syria and Iraq as part of Operation SHADER. On 1 April 2019 it moved to Lossiemouth where it converted to the Typhoon FGR Mk 4.

From 1 January 1915 until 25 July, No 10 acted as a training squadron at Farnborough. Arriving in France equipped with the standard BE's, it carries out corps reconnaissance tasks, re-equipping with FK8's in September1917 which it retained until February 1919 when, as a cadre, it returned to the UK to disband on 31 December 1919.

It did not reform until 1 January 1928 when it rejoined the order of battle as a night bombing squadron at Upper Heyford equipped with Hydrabads. These were replaced by Hinaidi's in April 1931 at the same time as the squadron moved to Boscombe Down. Virginias arrived in September 1932 but two years later these were replaced by Heyfords. Two other squadrons were formed from a nucleus provide by No 10, No 97 on 16 September 1935 and No 78 on 1 November 1936.

A move up north to Dishforth in 1937, also brought further re-equipment, this time in the form of the monoplane Whitley. No 10 took the Whitley to war in 1939 as part of No 4 Group and continued to fly the type until December 1941 when the Halifax arrived, operating as part of the main force for the remainder of the war.

As part of No 4 Group, the squadron was transferred to Transport Command on 1 May 1945, initially using its Halifaxes, but from August Dakotas replaced these and the squadron move to India in October remaining on transport duties until disbanding on 20 December 1947.

Oakington was No 10's next home when No 238 Squadron was renumbered there on 'Bonfire Night' 1948, still flying Dakotas, which it used during the 'Berlin Airlift' before being disbanded again 20 February 1950. The squadron reverted to the bomber role on 15 January 1953 when it became a Canberra unit at Scampton. It took part in the Suez operations in 1956 before disbanding again on 15 January 1957.

Another period as a bomber squadron began on 15 April 1958 at Cottesmore, this time as part of the V-Force equipped with Victors, but again this was relatively short-lived as the squadron disbanded on 1 March 1964. Its next re-birth, however, would become its longest period of existence, when it became the first squadron to operate the VC10 at Brize Norton on 1 July 1966. It still operates the type today, although following conversion of its aircraft to C(K) Mk 1 standard it now includes air-to-air refuelling in its tasking. However on 14 October 2005 it was disbanded, its aircraft and personnel being absorbed into No 101 Squadron. The squadron reformed on 1 August 2011 to operate the Voyager at RAF Brize Norton in the Air Transport and Air-to-Air Refuelling role but it's aircraft did not begin arriving until 2012.


Shot down in raid on Berlin 1 March 1943 and abandoned the aircraft. He was taken prisoner.

Source : "Footprints on the sands of time" by Oliver Clutton-Brock and Chorley

Date record last updated : 10 January 2016


Sgt A T B Jackson, Royal New Zealand Air Force, Nationality : New Zealand, Date taken POW 26 July 1942, POW number 25092

Imprisoned at POW camp Beninia?, Poland
Imprisoned at POW camp Lamsdorf (Lambinowice), Germany - from 1943, was previously Stalag 8B
Imprisoned at POW camp Lamsdorf (Lambinowice), Germany - until 1943 when it became Stalag 344
SEE PRISONERS OF WAR

Source : "Footprints on the sands of time" by Oliver Clutton-Brock

Date record last updated : 30 October 2020


Sgt George William Jackson, 930818, Observer, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 2 April 1942, Aged 20

Buried in REICHSWALD FOREST WAR CEMETERY. Reference : Coll. grave 9. A. 3-6.

Son of Stanley Jackson, and of Daisy Elizabeth Jackson, of Willesden, Middlesex.

Source : Ian Hunt and CWGC

Date record last updated : 23 August 2009


Fg/Off John Malcolm Shand Jackson, 171668, Pilot, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 6 November 1944, Aged 21

Buried in REICHSWALD FOREST WAR CEMETERY. Reference : Coll. Grave 22. A. 8-12.

Son of Albert Peter and Muriel Emily Jackson, of Newbury, Berkshire.

During the period from April 1944 to May 1945 John flew 29 Fortress missions. (Actually "operational take-offs". Does not disregard aborted ops, early returns etc.)

Previously he flew Stirlings with 214 Squadron.

Source : CWGC and Ian Hunt

Date record last updated : 30 November 2018


Sgt Richard John 'Jake' Jacob, Rear Gunner, Royal Air Force

Jake volunteered for the RAF aged 18 and was accepted for air crew. He first flew in 1944 on Ansons while training. He passed out as a Sergeant and was posted to 214 Squadron flying as a gunner on Fortress aircraft, on decoy raids over the continent. Half of the crew were from Canada. He started as a waist gunner then flew as a rear gunner.
When asked what it was like to fly over enemy territory in wartime Jake said " We were scared but we did it". While at RAF Foulsham in Norfolk Jake met and fell in love with a motor transport driver named Gwe. They were married in St mary's Rickmansworth just after the end of the war. In those days clothes were rationed and a wedding dress was hard to come by, but as Gwen worked at MGM she was able to get married in a dress worn by Margaret Lockwood in "The Wicked Lady".After being demobbed he got a job as a clerk with Penman Jones solicitors and was offered articles. He qualified six years later and after a while he was offered a partnership. Eventually he became one of the four senior partners. He retired in 1988. He was appointed Chairman of the South Eastern Legal Aid area and sat as Deputy Registrar at the local County Court.

Source : F A Wilkes

Date record last updated : 16 January 2014


FS Douglas Harold Morton Jacques, R/76606, Wireless Operator / Air Gunner, Royal Canadian Air Force, Nationality : Canadian, KIA 15 April 1942, Aged 20

Buried in HEVERLEE WAR CEMETERY. Reference : Joint grave 3. E. 17-18.

Source : Chorley and CWGC and Alain Rosseels (Researcher from Belgium)

Date record last updated : 14 September 2018


Hyman Louis Jaffe

Debbie Midda writes :
I have just confirmed story from my grandmother about one of her brothers who died over France in 1919. His name was Hyman Louis Jaffe and was killed with three others flying over France in 1919.

Source : Deborah Midda relation

Date record last updated : 7 June 2018


Fg/Off D E James

Fg/Off James evaded capture when Stirling BK653 BU-A, crashed in the village of Bonneuil les Eaux, Northern France on 16 April 1943

Source : Julien Saguez, French Researcher and Chorley

Date record last updated : 30 July 2011


Sgt R A James

Was an occasional replacement for crew members of HB774 BU-G

Source : David Wright (son of Flt/Lt George Wright)

Date record last updated : 4 August 2009


Sgt Ronald Arthur 'Jimmy' James, 195159, Mid Upper Gunner, Royal Air Force, Nationality : British

Born in Northampton, England

Son of Arthur and Alice James of Northampton. Husband of Winifred.

Ronald joined the RAF in 1942 and completed two tours of operations, firstly with No.90 Squadron as a mid upper gunner on Stirling Bombers in the crew of Bill Day, DFC. He then moved to No. 214 Squadron in 1944 where he flew on B-17 Flying Fortresses as part of 100 Group special countermeasures operations.

At the end of the war he was posted to the Dutch East Indies where he helped with the release of prisoners of war and internees held by the Japanese in the prison camps of Java. After this he left the RAF and returned to Northampton, working in the commercial side of engineering and owning a transport motel. He then fulfilled his lifelong ambition of owning a bookshop which he ran with his son Steve.

He was a keen amateur historian and much of his retirement was spent writing.

He collected a great deal of information about the squadron with the help of Flt/Lt David Rurherford-Dickson, whose wife, Rosaleen organised the material including many photographs into a book that was named 'Avenging in the Shadows',published in 1989, with Ron 'Jimmy' James listed as the author.

Ronald also wrote several other books which he was not able to publish before his death. Fortunately his daughter, Elizabeth, published these for him in 2013 and they are now available from Amazon. One book entitled 'I Was One of the Brylcreem Boys' (isbn 9781481089593) is an autobiography of his experiences in the RAF and it refers to the time he spent in No. 214 Squadron. The other titles are 'Mercy Mission to Java' (isbn 9781481895477) and 'Winged Words' (isbn 9781482579796).

Source : Elizabeth James Ingham (daughter of Ronald), Rosaleen Dickson wife of Flt/Lt David Rutherford-Dickson and Mike Day (son of Sqn/Ldr Day)

Date record last updated : 22 June 2014


Sgt Raymond Godfrey James, 1652915, Flight Engineer, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 22 September 1943

Buried in HANOVER WAR CEMETERY. Reference : Coll. grave 10. D. 5-8.

Date record last updated : 15 May 2020


Sgt Thomas Webley James, 541997, Air Gunner, Royal Air Force, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 12 May 1941, Aged 24

Buried in HAMBURG CEMETERY. Reference : Joint grave 5A. F. 4-5.

Son of Evan Rhys James and Lily Maud James, of Gabalfa, Cardiff.

Source : Andrew Lindsay (nephew) and Christopher Jary - Author and Ian Hunt and CWGC

Date record last updated : 27 February 2010


Sgt William Henry James, 972478, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 7 December 1940

Named on the following Memorial : RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL Panel 15

Source : Nightjar Newsletter Winter / Spring 2006 and CWGC

Date record last updated : 11 April 2009

Flew with WO Edwin Barnett.

Alan Barnett writes :
I believe Bob Jarvis & his family (wife & 3 or 4 daughters) later emigrated to Australia upon retiring from the RAF.

Source : Alan Barnett (son of WO Edwin Barnett)

Date record last updated : 30 October 2018


F/WO Reginald Jeffcock DFM, Nationality : United Kingdom

Born in Sheffield England


Reginald inspecting a Lancaster at RAF Coningsby 1985Reginald Jeffcock served with distinction during the Second World War in the RAF. He completed 48 operations over enemy territory, including 21 missions to heavily defended Berlin, flying as a bomb-aimer in Lancaster bombers in 49 Squadron, 15 Group and, following a period as a bombing instructor, as a radar counter measures operator in B17 Flying Fortresses on special operations with 214 Squadron, 100 Group.
For his dedicated service he was presented with the Distinguished Flying Medal, on the morning of VE Day, by King George VI at Buckingham Palace.

After the war he married and made a successful career as a sales engineer working for several Sheffield and national-based companies.

Jeff was a keen and gifted artist, capable of fine works in water-colour, oils and pastels and was a founder-member of the Buxton Arts Society.

A tireless worker for local causes he was, for several years a Parish councillor for Chapel-en-le-Frith, was a founder-member of the Chapel-en-le-Frith Amenity Society and served on the Carnival Committee for many years

He died on 14 January 1995, aged 71, at Chapel-en-Frith, Derbyshire. He was a resident in Chapel since 1981 and was survived by his wife Jessie, sons Timothy, Andrew and Steven and granddaughter Emma.

His brother, Donald, sadly died in 2004.

Date record last updated : 22 June 2014



Sqn/Ldr Jeffery is on the left


Sqn/Ldr Jeffery's medals


Sqn/Ldr Jeffery and crew

Sqn/Ldr S R 'Roly' Jeffery

Sqn/Ldr S R Jeffery of 214 lost his parents at a young age and attended boarding school as a result of this.

He was recognised to have good academic skills and was selected for a boy apprenticeship at RAF Halton.

Once again his academic ability was recognised, and he was selected for Officer training and Pilot training. Whilst training he had elocution lessons. Once an officer he was assigned a batman.

Among the early aircraft he flew were biplanes Sopwith Camel and The Tiger Moth.

In 1935 he flew biplanes patrolling the river Nile during the Abyssinian conflict with mounted guns.

By the late 1930's he had qualified as a Pilot, qualified navigator, and trainer pilot.

Throughout his flying career he flew many different aircraft including many Bomber aircraft including Wellington, Lancaster, Blenheim, Stirling and the B29 Flying Fortress loaned by the USAF.

As a Pilot on 2nd Op of Plt/Off Bill Foskett per his log of 25 November 1943, Bill amusingly remembers Sqn/Ldr Jeffery as being a chain smoker who smoked steadily for 6hrs of an 8hr Op.

Having completed 30 Bombing raids to Germany he was then grounded and spent the remainder of the war training pilots in flight and navigation.

After WW2 "Roly" as he was affectionately known by his colleagues worked in air freight for Skyways and for Flight Refuelling LTD where he was a true pioneer of flight refuelling, in a converted Lancaster.

He is also noted in the book, A Thousand Shall Fall by Murray Peden

Source : Peter Jeffery (son) and Bill Foskett

Date record last updated : 10 January 2016


Fg/Off Jenkins, Co-pilot

Occasional Co-Pilot with Crew ??Leyshon

He was killed when he was the pilot of his own crew.

(This could possibly be the same person as Fg/Off RMP Jenkyns)

Source : Aled Leyshon (grandson of Mervyn Leyshon)

Date record last updated : 2 October 2009


Sgt Jenkins

Source : 214 Squadron ORB

Date record last updated : 8 February 2019


Sgt A N Jenkins, R/70070, Observer

He was again part of an aircrew to be seconded to 15 OTU for 215 Squadron on 11 March 1942.

Source : Colin Burningham

Date record last updated : 29 May 2010


Plt/Off Edward Bertram Douglas Jenkins, 748696, Pilot, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 28 December 1940

Buried in LUTON CHURCH BURIAL GROUND. Reference : Sec. 3. Row O. Grave 29.

William Frank Newbury writes :
Ted Jenkins' mother and my grandmother were neighbours and very good friends, the loss of Ted was hard for all family and friends. I was eight years old then and can remember seeing the Union flag draped coffin being brought into All Saints Church in Luton for the funeral. I also think that Ted, at the time, was engaged to Mary. This picture of Ted comes from a family collection, I hope this picture will add to the 214 Squadron archive and be seen by many on the website.

Source : CWGC and Nightjar Newsletter Winter / Spring 2006 and William Frank Newbury

Date record last updated : 10 November 2017


Plt/Off John Charles Jenkins, 64315, Pilot, Royal Air Force, Nationality : British, KIA 15 July 1941, Aged 20

Son of David John & Gwendoline Jekins of Llanwenog, Carmarthenshire, Wales

Pilot Office Jenkins was originally buried in Evangelical Cemetery near where the aircraft crashed. His remains were removed to Rheinberg War Cemetery in 1945.

Source : Chorley and CWGC

Date record last updated : 9 January 2017


Fg/Off Reginald Maurice Peter Jenkyns, 76584, Pilot, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 7 July 1941, Aged 25

Buried in AS COMMUNAL CEMETERY. Reference : Grave 5

Son of Reginald Richard and Julia Gladys Jenkyns, of Swaythling, Southampton.

Source : CWGC and grave photograph by Ivo Swinnen of As, Belgium

Date record last updated : 2 October 2009


FS Jennings, Port Waist Gunner

Source : John Ritchie, son of Sgt J Ritchie

Date record last updated : 9 June 2009


Sgt Brian Roland Jennings, 1215579, Air Gunner, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 12 March 1943, Aged 19

Son of Roland Bingham Jennings and Florence Amelia Jennings, of Hall Green, Birmingham.

Source : CWGC and Nightjar Newsletter Spring 2004 and Chorley

Date record last updated : 20 November 2020



Photograph taken approximately 1989

WO/II Douglas Reid Jennings DFC, R153179, Air Gunner, Royal Canadian Air Force, Nationality : Canadian, Date taken POW 21 June 1944, POW number Unknown

Named on the following Memorial : RAF Evaders Society (Canadian branch) Nominal Roll

Born in Middle Musquodoboit, Canada

Buried in RIVERSIDE CEMETERY, ELMSVALE, CANADA

Son of Austin Erle Jennings and Isabelle Marion (Reid) Jennings, Husband of Betty June Blakeny and Enid Wood

WO/II Jennings was the only crew member from Fortress BU.B to bail out and evade capture. Taken originally to a German run hospital with shrapnel in his leg he managed to escape later disguised as a policeman with the help of the Dutch Resistance and return to the UK. He was later awarded the DFC which was Gazetted November 1944. In later years he became a Minister in the Canadian Church.

Home in Elmsdale, Nova Scotia home there. Enlisted in Halifax, 31 March 1942. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 10 October 1942), No.1 BGS (graduated 23 December 1942) and No.1 AOS (graduated 5 February 1943).

In air operations Warrant Officer Jennings has displayed courage, endurance and devotion to duty of the highest order.


Picture of Doug in his later years, reunited with Mientje Manders, one of the Dutch resistance fighters that had helped him escape the Germans. Photo is from a book titled "The Evaders" true stories of downed airmen and their helpers in world war 2. Published by McGraw-Hill Ryerson of Montreal Canada. Authors Emmerson Lavender and Norman Sheffe.

Obituary : JENNINGS, Reverend Douglas R. DFC - 80, passed away suddenly at home in Melville Gardens, Halifax, the evening of November 24, 2002. . Following a challenging childhood helping take care of his mother and younger sister during the Great Depression in Cleveland, Ohio, Doug enlisted with the RCAF and served overseas during the Second World War as a warrant officer with RAF's Bomber Command covert operations. He was before being shot down and wounded over occupied Holland, escaping custody and returning to Allied lines with the help of the Dutch and Belgian undergrounds, thus earning his Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC), which he modestly referred to as the EGO (Everybody Got One). After the war, he studied at Dalhousie University and Pine Hill Divinity Hall before being ordained at St. Matthew's United Church, Halifax and moving to Maitland, to serve for a couple of years as Minister at the United Church there. Doug moved his ministry to India for 17 years with his late wife, Betty and their four children as an evangelist, director of a vocational/residential school, then an agricultural advisor. He returned to Canada in the early 1970s to serve United Church of Canada congregations in Bayfield, N.B., Amherst, N.S. and Peticodiac, N.B. before retiring to live in Truro with his second wife, Enid (Wood) Jennings, where they operated the Lonely Planet Guide internationally-rated Blue House Inn for a number of years before retiring once more to Halifax. Doug loved theology, motorcycles, cars, keeping up with current events, tennis, photography and his extended family of kin and old and new friends. Doug will always be remembered by those who knew him as striving against the traces of conformity, standing up for his beliefs, loving a good conversation and having the soft touch for the underdog that enabled him to befriend the downtrodden and kings with the same frank interest. He was predeceased by his mother and father sister, Mary (Kaulback) wife, Betty June (Blakney). He is mourned by his wife, Enid sons, David, Halifax Andrew, Shediac, N.B. Christopher, Vancouver, B.C. daughter, Rebecca, Perth, Australia, as well as by grandchildren, Aine, Ariadne, Eli, Austin and Walker. Also surviving are stepsons, Leslie Wood, Charlottetown David Wood, Amherst stepdaughters, Margaret Wood, Halifax June Julian, Porters Lake. Memorial donations may be made to the United Church World Missions and Service Fund or to The Salvation Army. Visiting 7-9 p.m. today, funeral 2 p.m. Thursday, November 28, both in Riverside United Church, Elmsvale, Rev. Marjory Cornelius officiating. Interment in Riverside Cemetery. Arrangements entrusted to Arimathea Funeral Co-op, Upper Musquodoboit. Condolences : [email protected]

Source : Andrew Jennings (son) and John Cripps (nephew of Sgt Sydney Bryant) and Obituary and Nightjar Newsletter Spring 2003

Date record last updated : 30 October 2020


FS Geoffrey James Edward Jennings DFM, 1394514, Rear Gunner, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, Date taken POW 24 February 1945, POW number Unknown

Born in Hatfield, Herts, England

Flt/Lt Leslie Fowler and FS Jennings were the only ones to survive the crash. Fowler was wounded and taken to a hospital by the Germans. He died on 15 March 1945 and was buried in Zuidlaren General Cemetery. Jennings spent the rest of the war in POW camps. No POW number listed. No POW camps listed.

Also served with 76 Squadron, where he was awarded DFM, reported in London Gazette 30 June 1944.

Geoffrey died in 1987 in Hatfield, Herts, England

Source : Jackie Jennings (daughter) and Ian Hunt and "Footprints on the sands of time" by Oliver Clutton Brock and London Gazette and Ernst-Jan Jonkers (researcher)

Date record last updated : 6 October 2019


Sgt John Edward Jerrard, 961532, Observer, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 29 August 1941, Aged 23

Son of Gordon Charles and Ida Louisa Terrard, of Walthamstow, Essex.

Source : Chorley and CWGC

Date record last updated : 5 January 2014


Fg/Off R F 'Bob' Jewsbury, Bomb Aimer

Served with 214 Squadron from March 1943 as a bomb aimer on Stirlings, completing a full tour of ops.

There is more information on the crew record for Stirling ??Dixon.

John Jewsbury (son of R F Jewsbury) has written a history of his father and the ??Dixon crew. Click here to read the document :R F (Bob) Jewsbury his RAF time

Source : John Jewsbury (son of R F Jewsbury) and Walter Rowley

Date record last updated : 10 July 2009


Sgt W John-Biggs, Air Gunner

Source : Arthur Skone

Date record last updated : 22 June 2014


Sqn/Ldr Fielding Johnson

Johnson who was with "A Fight" 214 was the oldest rear gunner in the service 40/41. He was a London MP. and also served as a Navigator gunner in the 14/18 RFC.

Source : William Walker, UK


Sgt George Eric Johnson, 1124496, Navigator, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 3 February 1943, Aged 21

Named on the following Memorial :Darlington War Memorial Hospital BOR
Named on the following Memorial : No. 3 Group Bomber Command Roll of Honour in the RAF Window in Ely Cathedral.
Named on the following Memorial : RAF Chedburgh Book of Remembrance in All Saints Church, Chedburgh
Named on the following Memorial : RAF Chedburgh Memorial

Buried in BENSCHOP GENERAL CEMETERY. Reference : Collective Grave

Son of Lawrence George and Hilda Mary Johnson, of Darlington, Co. Durham.

Source : CWGC and Nightjar Newsletters Spring 2004 and Spring 2008 and Simon Glancey

Date record last updated : 1 December 2017


WO Leonard Alfred Johnson DFC, R78489, Royal Canadian Air Force, Nationality : American

Born in St Paul, Minnesota, USA

Born in 1914. He was a newsman in Minnesota.
Enlisted in Toronto, 24 October 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS, No.7 EFTS, and No.2 SFTS.

One night in July 1942, Warrant Officer Johnson and Sergeants Agg and McGowen were captain and air gunners respectively of an aircraft detailed to attack Saarbrucken. Before the target was reached the aircraft was engaged by a Messerschmitt 110. Sergeants Agg and McGowen met several attacks with resolute fire and succeeded in destroying the attacker. The skillful airmanship of Warrant Officer Johnson contributed materially to this success.

On another occasion in August 1942, this aircrew were detailed to attack Nuremberg. On the outward flight, whilst still a considerable distance from the target, their aircraft was intercepted by an enemy fighter. Skilful maneuvering by Warrant Officer Johnson enabled his gunners to deliver their fire from a favourable position and destroy the attacker. Despite damage sustained to his aircraft,
Warrant Officer Johnson continued his mission, located his target and bombed it. These airmen have displayed praiseworthy determination to achieve their purposes.

DFC Award effective 8 September 1942 as per London Gazette dated 29 September 1942 and AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942.

Date record last updated : 29 December 2008



Excerpt from Operations Record Book

Flt/Lt Marshall Angus Johnson, R68074 and J96444, Rear Gunner, Royal Canadian Air Force, Nationality : Canadian, Date taken POW 14 July 1941, POW number 39260

Imprisoned at POW camp Bad Sulza / Muhlhausen, Germany
Imprisoned at POW camp Heydekrug (Silute), Lithuania
Imprisoned at POW camp Thorn (Torun), Poland OR Oerbke (Fallingbostel), Germany - dates unknown

Born in St Thomas, Ontario, Canada

Only son of Mr & Mrs Angus Johnson

Member of the Elgin Regiment prior to enlisting in the RAF. Graduated from the Fingal Bombing and Gunnery school on Mar 15 1941. Promoted P/O 9th May 1944 authority AFHQ-M7258, Promoted F/O 1st November 1944 authority AFHQ- . Received his commission from the RCAF 1st of May, 1944., promoted Temporary Flying Officer effective 1st November, 1944

Marsh left for home via the L L Louis Pasteur June 1 - 7, 1945

Friends : Martin Marty Platz, Bill Haslam (pow), Bill Donnely

Marsh arrived at 214 Squadron, threw his kit on his bunk, climbed into a Wellington for his first Op and never came back, he spent the entire rest of the war in a German prison camp. As a result, having few friends or shared experiences (other than his pilot) he went the entire rest of his life feeling like an outsider to the Squadron. Hardly surprising considering he was four years imprisoned and mere days on the squadron. He of course was not alone and this is why so many turned to the POW Associations, it was with other POW's they felt a bond and it was all they had. How fitting it is then that after so many decades has passed that Marsh would come to be founder of the 214 Squadron web site.

14 July 1941. While at 10,000 feet over the city of Bremen in Germany, BU-G was attacked by a german fighter aircraft who came from above and to the side. According to pilot Crampton, Marsh who was rear gunner at the time, calmly announced over the intercom, as if he were talking about the weather, "down the phones, we are under attack" and promptly sent up a hail of gun fire to meet his attacker. The German fighter raked the forward section of BU-G killing their second pilot Jenkins and the aircraft immediately exploded in flames. The rest of the crew managed to bale out safely with only minor injuries but Sgt Kent's chute caught and tangled on the tail of the flaming aircraft and he was pulled down with it to his death. All of the surviving members were captured by the germans, two of whom were sent to a german hospital and the rest off to prison camp where they spent the rest of the war.

He died on 23 September 2003

"It is with heavy heart I regret to inform everyone that Flt/Lt Marshall Johnson (Marsh) passed away this morning September 23, 2003

Marsh has been very ill for some time but you never let go of hope even down to the final hour. In the worst, I naively consoled myself thinking that 'knowing this day was coming' would ease the hurt and that horrible emptiness when the day finally came. It does not in the slightest. To Marsh's wife Shirley, one of the most wonderful ladies I know, and to their children Anne & Howard, and to Leonard and the grandchildren I would like to extend my deepest sympathy. I feel helpless knowing there is nothing I can do or say.

Marsh's loss hits hard personally, but there is always a feeling of great sadness when I learn of the loss of any of our veterans. Not only for them and their family, but also for the memories that are lost for eternity. Those that made it home are the trustees of the memories of friends and comrades who 'did not' and it is often a great subconscious burden they carry. Only now, are many of us awakening to the fact that these memories are the last hope and a priceless gift to someone, somewhere, searching for information on their lost loved one. Marsh saw this clearly, and helped me to understand that this gift is exchanged both ways, and that "both" part company with forever lighter hearts.

In talking with Marsh over drinks one day, the conversation turned to these difficulties facing the many thousands of people who are desperately searching for information on a family member lost during the war. Marsh wryly appreciated the fact that those who made it home were getting fewer every day and that the few memories and information left to capture would soon be gone forever. We both wondered, and confessed our own guilt, at the human nature that causes us to leave these things until it is to late. (A sentiment I know, which has been echoed by many of you.) He thought there should be some means for veterans like himself to record and pool their memories, for the benefit of those families who lost a family member. It was this comment which inspired and sparked the idea for a web site and many long months later the FMS 214 Squadron site was born.

Sadly, Marsh was never to see his idea and dream become reality as his health and vision deteriorated rapidly while I was immersed in building it. In fact, he has never so much as seen the site, let alone to share in the great joy I have had in meeting the many families who have written in. It saddens me beyond words he was cheated out of sharing in this. Marsh never finished his own profile despite my constant nagging, "why would anyone want to read about me he'd ask?" Like many other veterans, he never felt his contribution was important, it was always the other guy who should get the spotlight and the credit. However, he continued to help as best he could and he would but shake his head in disbelief when I told him of all the letters and help with the project that was pouring in from all over the world. Like any other veteran he was deeply moved and grateful to know, there really are so many people who "still remember" and "still care".

On behalf of Marsh, my sincerest thanks to all of you for getting involved with the project and making it a success. We can all take tremendous pride in the fact the site has already brought together scores of the 214 Squadron families from around the world, most for the first time, and has reunited veterans who have not spoke in over half a century. Numerous children and grandchildren desperately searching for any information on the father or grandfather they never knew have found help or in the least, hope. I owe Marsh profoundly for my being able to play a small part in this. This site is his legacy, It is a great gift to us all but no less do we owe 'all' the veterans found here within it's pages.


SITE FOUNDER
Flt/Lt MARSHALL A JOHNSON

Marsh hated this picture and wished I would put up a special favorite of his, wearing his Officers cap. However, I steadfastly refused to take this one down until he finished his profile in the personnel section. Of course he never did finish it, but It was great fun antagonizing him at every opportunity by drawing his attention to the fact that people from all over the world were seeing his dreaded picture. Not one to be a sore loser, his daughter Anne brought over the other picture, which you see on the opening page to this site.

You win Marsh, I tip my hat (pun intended) to the more stubborn of the two of us. I knew I would lose anyway, Age and Treachery always overcomes Youth and Skill. I miss you.

Source : "Footprints on the sands of time" by Oliver Clutton-Brock and Chorley and Marshall Johnson and Kevin Crawford

Date record last updated : 9 January 2017


Flt/Lt W A 'Johnny' Johnson-Biggs DFC, Rear Gunner

Johnny, with his wife, was a regular attender at Reunions until 2004 when age and ill health prevented him from coming.
His story, "How I became an air gunner" was published in the Winter/Spring 2006 edition of the Nightjar.
He joined the RAF in 1935 and trained as a medical orderly in the rank of ACl and ended the war as a Flt/Lt. with a DFC . He flew a total of 67 ops as a rear gunner (a few as mid-upper) with 214 on Stirlings and 15, 97 and 619 Squadrons on Lancasters. He was also credited with shooting down two night fighters. He was awarded the DFC on June 30th. 1944.

Johnny died on February 14th. 2007 aged 96

At his funeral service on March 1st 2007 Norman Storey, a 214 Squadron Association member and a fellow air gunner read out a tribute to Johnny and said he was a very courageous man in both war and peace and always cheerful whatever adversity befell him.
At the beginning and end of the funeral service an organist played "Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines" and during part of the service the "Dambusters March" was played.

Source : Nightjar Newsletter Summer/Autumn 2007

Date record last updated : 7 November 2009


FS C K Johnston DFM, Rear Gunner

Not listed on Squadron ORB for BK600 but listed on log book?

Source : George Johnston (son)

Date record last updated : 3 October 2010


Sgt Jones, Co-pilot

Source : Ian Hunt


Sgt A E Jones, 949607, Waist Gunner, Date taken POW 29 September 1941, POW number 18329

Imprisoned at POW camp Heydekrug (Silute), Lithuania
Imprisoned at POW camp Lamsdorf (Lambinowice), Germany - until 1943 when it became Stalag 344
Imprisoned at POW camp Sagan (Zagan) & Belaria, Germany
Imprisoned at POW camp Thorn (Torun), Poland OR Oerbke (Fallingbostel), Germany - dates unknown

Date record last updated : 1 January 2010


Fg/Off Allan Milton Jones DFM, 1256275, Mid Upper Gunner, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 24 February 1945

Buried in RHEINBERG WAR CEMETERY. Reference : 6.E.21

Was also with 115 Squadron where he received the DFM recorded in the London Gazette on 15 June 1943.

Source : CWGC and Ian Hunt

Date record last updated : 7 December 2008


Sgt A N Jones, 949607, Date taken POW 29 September 1941, POW number 18329

Imprisoned at POW camp Heydekrug (Silute), Lithuania
Imprisoned at POW camp Lamsdorf (Lambinowice), Germany - until 1943 when it became Stalag 344
Imprisoned at POW camp Sagan (Zagan) & Belaria, Germany
Imprisoned at POW camp Thorn (Torun), Poland OR Oerbke (Fallingbostel), Germany - dates unknown

Source : Nicola Jones (daughter of Sgt Leslie Hancock) and "Footprints on the sands of time" by Oliver Clutton-Brock and Chorley

Date record last updated : 1 January 2010


AC2 David Stephen Jones, 1071392, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, KIA 15 March 1941, Aged 29

Buried in LAMPETER (ST. PETER) CHURCHYARD. Reference : North of church.

Son of Stephen and Elizabeth Jones, of Lampeter husband of Marjorie Gwendoline Jones, of Corwen, Merionethshire.

Date record last updated : 30 September 2020


Flt/Lt Eric H 'Taffy' Jones

He was the pilot for one Fortress flight between April 1944 to May 1945 (actual operational take-offs. Does not disregard aborted ops, early returns etc.)

Date record last updated : 7 December 2018


Sgt Godfrey Tegid Jones, 947989, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 25 June 1941, Aged 23

Named on the following Memorial : RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL Panel 46.

Son of Godfrey Jones, and of Jane Ellen Jones, of Llysfaen, Caernarvonshire.

Date record last updated : 12 October 2011


FS H E Jones, Waist Gunner, Nationality : British, Date taken POW 14 July 1941, POW number 39271

Imprisoned at POW camp Bad Sulza / Muhlhausen, Germany
Imprisoned at POW camp Thorn (Torun), Poland OR Oerbke (Fallingbostel), Germany - dates unknown

Source : "Footprints on the sands of time" by Oliver Clutton-Brock and Chorley

Date record last updated : 9 January 2017


Sgt J H Jones

Source : Bob Brown (nephew of Sgt Richard Kerry)

Date record last updated : 1 December 2017


Sgt Robert Alan Derek Jones, 1811322, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 22 March 1945, Aged 20

Named on the following Memorial : RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL Panel 275

Son of Eric George and Matilda Emily Jones, of East Dulwich, London.

Source : Chorley and CWGC and Nightjar Newsletter Spring 2003 and Catherine Stewart (relative of WO James McFarlane)

Date record last updated : 27 July 2010


FS Stanley Llewellyn Jones, 1256275, Waist Gunner, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 24 February 1945

Buried in RHEINBERG WAR CEMETERY. Reference : 6.E.21

Source : CWGC and Ian Hunt and KJ Jones (relative)

Date record last updated : 7 December 2008


Sgt T Jones, Co-pilot

Occasional Co-Pilot with Crew ??Leyshon

He was killed when he was the pilot of his own crew.

Source : Aled Leyshon (grandson of Mervyn Leyshon)

Date record last updated : 2 October 2009


Sgt Thomas Jones, 1622196, Air Gunner, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 24 June 1943, Aged 33

Buried atNOORDWIJK GENERAL CEMETERY. Plot 6. Joint grave 2.

Son of Robert and Elizabeth Jones, of Penrhos, Caernarvonshire.

Source : Ian Hunt and CWGC


Sgt William Henry Jones, 571733, Flight Engineer, Royal Air Force, KIA 17 August 1942, Aged 21

Named on the following Memorial :Durham Johnstone School

Buried in MANBY (ST. MARY) CHURCHYARD. Reference : Grave 9.

Son of Alfred Benjamin and Jane Ann Jones, of Langley Moor, Co. Durham.

Source : CWGC and Simon Glancey

Date record last updated : 1 December 2017


Wg/Cdr Jordan, Co-pilot

Occasional Co-Pilot with Crew ??Leyshon

Commanding Officer of 214 Squadron. He retired as Air Chiel Marshall

Source : Aled Leyshon (grandson of Mervyn Leyshon)

Date record last updated : 2 October 2009


Sgt James Jordan, Observer

Source : Lynn Mortimer (daughter of Flt/Lt John Valentine Swan) and 214 Squadron ORB

Date record last updated : 28 February 2020


Sgt Brian McMahon Jubb, 1315154, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Nationality : United Kingdom, KIA 26 May 1943, Aged 21

Named on the following Memorial : RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL Panel 155

Son of Edwin Charles Jubb, C.B., O.B.E., and Emily Herbert Jubb, of Farnham Common, Buckinghamshire.

After his aircraft crashed into the North Sea his body was never recovered.

Source : CWGC and Geoff Swallow (Australian researcher) and Chorley

Date record last updated : 31 January 2010


Sgt S Judge

Source : 214 Squadron ORB

Date record last updated : 17 April 2020


Flt/Lt 'Bert' Jukes, Navigator / Plotter

Bertie's wife, Mary, died in May 2012.

Source : Tom Robson and Squadron Association and Nightjar Newlsletter May 2013 and Flt/Lt David Card

Date record last updated : 14 September 2018


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